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Neal

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About Neal

  • Rank
    Extreme Hunter
  • Birthday 15/03/1969

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  • Gender
    Male
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    Hampshire

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  1. All the ones I've met have been very vocal...which is their job...but maybe not so helpful in a rabbit catching dog (unless you're using them for bushing?).
  2. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    Well, I'm glad that's over!
  3. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    For two days in a row, I've trawled through another several pages in the hope that this (originally promising) thread might return to what it was...but I think I'm going to give up.
  4. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    That's good to know as, at some point in the future, I'm hoping to retire to Dartmoor and raise some rare breed sheep so it's good to know I could add a smidgen of greyhound and still expect them to herd well enough to do their job.
  5. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    Love the video, great idea; you get a brief hint at some differences in temperament already...still don't know how you'd pick between them though.
  6. Neal

    pup not taking to diet

    Thanks Arry! Still fine since keeping off the rawhide chews but I've decided to not even try the chicken just in case. Touch wood.
  7. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    There's also the unspoken added benefit of the fact that if I get one which is crap and "couldn't catch a cat in a kitchen" I can claim the lurcher card and say, "Well he's only a sheepdog."
  8. Neal

    pup not taking to diet

    Yeah, that's the thing I've found so odd; I've never had any digestion problems with previous dogs (the opposite if anything!) and, as you say, the inconsistency. He'll be fine for several days or weeks and then suddenly I come downstairs in the morning to a Shakatak (as we used to call it when we were little). However, because I'd not previously factored the rawhide chews into the equation, as I wasn't thinking of it as part of his diet, I'm hoping that could be it. I did suggest trying chicken again to my lovely lady wife but she wisely advised me to stick with what he's on now. Thanks again everybody, I'll update again in a few weeks one way or the other.
  9. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    Why do some people simply refuse to accept the fact that you don't have to have more sighthound blood if you want to catch something. Is it simply because, historically, some people produced rabbit catching dogs by mating greyhounds etc to collies etc and other people subsequently wrote books reiterating this fact so we now assume that, if we want to catch a rabbit, squirrel, rat, wood pigeon etc then we must have a dog which is half greyhound if we also want to go ferreting but three quarters greyhound if we don't? It's a good job God doesn't read lurcher books. He'd be saying to St Peter, "I'll have to scrap this experiment with grey wolves, painted wolves, foxes and all that jazz and go back to the drawing boards Pete 'cus I need more greyhound in 'em" I freely admit that most people with lurchers probably caught more rabbits than my kelpies did (when I had rabbits in my neck of the woods) but I work herding dogs probably for the same reason as Colliejohn and others: a) they catch more in the environment where I work them (thick woodland, hedgebottoms, bramble strewn ditches and small fields covered in thick tussocky grass) and b) I get on better with them and, as a wise man on here once said "temperament is king."
  10. Neal

    pup not taking to diet

    Thanks Gilbey. In that case (fingers crossed) I may have cracked it. I may try him on some dog grade chicken wings (with feathers still on etc) from the pet shop just to see.
  11. Neal

    pup not taking to diet

    An update: I had intended to write an update about a fortnight ago to basically say something on the lines of "Thanks for all your advice, everything's fine now since I cut out the chicken,"...but then it happened again. I did the usual thing of going over everything that had happened the previous day but the only thing I could think of was that my kids said he's chewed on a stick for a bit in the garden. Then it happened last week...and then again last night. My immediate assumption was that yesterday he'd also been given some leftovers in the form of two tiny new potatoes and some cooked lamb stake along with his usual minced beef etc so maybe he's just extremely sensitive to ANYTHING new. But I then remembered one other thing he had yesterday: a rawhide chew. I gave one to Noggin to keep him occupied while I took Ned to the wood with the kids and, because there was a bit left over when we got back, Ned finished it off. I used to give him a lot of rawhide chews as a pup and he's had a couple again recently so maybe it's those either instead of or as well as the chicken? I'd not previously considered the chews but when I stopped the chicken I stopped those too almost by accident as I was so focused on his meals. I'm almost tempted to give him chicken again just to see what happens. This last incident happened at half one in the night and I slept soundly all through it while, unbeknown to me, my lovely wife cleared it all up for me. What a star! However, she has basically said (understandably) that this can't go on indefinitely so I'm back to clutching at straws again and pulling my hair out wondering what the hell to do. I can't even leave him outside in the run as he's a barker and I have some passive aggressive neighbours who kindly inform me, "Did you know your dog was barking? I'm not complaining but I just thought you'd like to know."
  12. I was reading in a book recently that the breed most likely to attack both strangers and its owner is...…..drum roll please...….the dachshund! I was quite surprised. I thought it'd be one of those silly little handbag dogs whose ruined bodies means no other dogs can read their body language properly so they end up thinking everybody hates them.
  13. Neal

    New Arrivals.

    With regards to collie build, when I bought my first lurcher (just shy of thirty years ago) I was forever looking out for racy, leggy collies. However, since I stopped buying dogs with any sighthound blood I rarely think about their physical appearance. Well, that's not strictly true, but it's definitely my second or third consideration behind a) the pups character and b) the parents' character. I personally think my current pup's an ugly sod but he's got a great character. I once compared him and his older cousin Noggin by saying that if they were Hollywood actors then Noggin would be Brad Pitt or George Clooney whereas Ned would be Robin Williams or Harvey Keitel. I'm well aware that his character won't necessarily help him to catch anything ...but it will effect his temperament (which might effect it) and it'll make it a lot more likely that I'll want to spend quality time with him.
  14. Neal

    Dog being aggressive

    Not wrong at all Black neck. To be honest, I've usually found the situation alters as a dog matures as you said. In an ideal world sensible males have one little scuffle when they first meet to see who's in charge and then remember it next time. Unfortunately, so many owners aren't as sensible as their dogs and either encourage their aggression or their defensive attitude (and subsequently their aggression again) thereby engendering a loose/loose situation. That's why I now try to keep my friendly and unfriendly dogs under closer control, simply because most other owners make the situation worse. I quite often meet people with excited friendly dogs like Ned who are so pleased that I let my dogs socialize with them as they're usually subject to the same discrimination as mine i.e. "Heck, there's a dog coming towards us, quickly pick up Fifi and get ready to run!" I firmly believe that's why most of the unfriendly dogs we meet are lap dogs.
  15. Neal

    Dog being aggressive

    Completely agree with Skycat's comments above. As an example, my current pup is ten months old and is extremely "happy" he'd readily go up to every human or dog at full speed to bounce all over them and invite them to play. Unfortunately, because he's black and tan with pricked ears, many owners fear the worst and assume he's going to rip their poor little darling apart. While it's tempting for me to think that's their fault, my dog's fine, they'll have to put up with it etc I don't want to be that kind of owner. I simply lay him down if he looks like he's going to get overly excited and gauge what kind of dog owner they are and then act accordingly e.g. let him up to play or keep him at down. I know some people are "dog lovers" who'd like my dog to jump all over them but most people don't. Yesterday somebody asked if they could say hello to him and when he approached them a little too excitedly I told him to "down" and she said, "that's ok, he can jump up," to which I added, "no he can't!" Fortunately, she realized what I meant and greeted him calmly and at his level. While my current problem may seem like the opposite, in that he wants to excitedly greet every dog rather than attack them, I think the same approach would probably work in your case. Incidentally, I also know the flip side of the coin as my older male was equally friendly as a pup but after being repeatedly attacked by dogs which had been encouraged to defend their owners, one such attack resulted in him running off and being knocked over by a car. He's since become aggressive towards the majority of dark coloured males which are acting either aggressively or defensively. Sometimes he does but sometimes he doesn't, so I simply always call him over and put him on the lead if I'm in any doubt. You could say it's not his fault or mine that he's aggressive but I'm not prepared to accept it whoever started it.
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