Jump to content

English Bull Terriers


Recommended Posts


  • Replies 445
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

heres a couple of pics, too many, sorry. i owned the brindle bitch. The white dog is my brothers, thunder rock bred and everything a bullie shod be. Both were 100% driven and capable. I know the breed

Posted this before in another section i know, but here's an e.b.t. x i owned close to thirty years ago now...an absolute b*****d of a dog. I've been around all of the bull and terrier types over the y

Without wishing to offend..........why would somebody called " working bull and terrier " be so bothered about " a straighter profile " and importing one " that looks like those " and be calling dogs

Posted Images

3 hours ago, forest of dean redneck said:

Plenty of old toyotas an landrovers out there 👍

I've always had Toyota Hilux utes,I bought an old one for $4000 and sold it for $4000 8 years later,still running perfectly.I only sold it to get a later model Hilux 4wd to get to spots easier.

  • Like 1
Link to post
30 minutes ago, gnasher16 said:

Without wishing to sound impolite i will never know why people allow little dogs like that to get so heavy its a massive strain on their joints.

I toatly agree with you gnasher.

I can't understand it. 

The usual reasons, over feeding the wrong type of food, to many "treats, and lazy owners.

Shame really, he would be a lot happier with half the weight, and a longer life span.

Atb j 

  • Like 1
Link to post
On 12/08/2020 at 22:59, Bosun11 said:

I'd recon that would be about right mate.

Mine was good as gold but then he was always working.

Back when i owned mine and had a massive interest in the breed, i knew of almost every BT in about half of the city. Most of them, including my dogs half brother, had bitten someone in the household.

There was a lady that lived down our street who had one, they had it for most of my life but i never seen it. The street i grew up in, was a typical terraced street of small two up two down houses.

This lady, Mrs Crutson, always looked out of place living there. A slim, sexless shrew  always smartly dressed, with a head scarf and horn rimmed glasses. I only seen her on occasion, walking hurredly down the street to shop, she never seemed to speak to anyone and though she was married, i never ever seen her husband in 16 years!

When i got my BT pup, neighbours who came to see it started to tell me that Mrs Crutson has one of them dogs, its huge and everytime they told me, they all rolled their eyes?

I remember stopping outside her front door and hearing that snuffling sound of a dog sniffing under the door, which i'd never noticed before in the thousands of times i'd walked past. I was determined to see this dog but it took me weeks to pluck up 'courage' to knock, she was such an odd lady.

So i did and after what seemed like an age, the door opened a crack and one horned rimmed eye peered out at me. I blurted out that i had a dog the same as hers and could i possibly see it, because i loved the breed? She looked terrified, telling me no and shutting the door on me.

It was a strange encounter and i went home and asked my mum about it. She told me i should never have knocked there and a tale was told as to the reason i was told a firm 'no' at the door.

Mrs Crutson's husband brought the dog home as a puppy but, he was strange, a loner and only left and entered the house during darkness and then from the back entry (which is why i never seen him!) He doted on the dog but never took it out the door. The beast would attack both of them regular but more so her. Her direct neighbours would hear her screaming in both pain and terror when the dog attacked and it was often but her husband would never get rid of it. Her legs and hands were full of scars from the dog, which made sense as she always wore gloves.

She hated the dog and lived in constant fear of it and i can only look back and think how bad that must have been for her but times were different then and many secrets were kept behind closed doors. I always looked upon her with different eyes when she shuffled past after that.

I've no idea as to why i've took the time to write this post, other than i've never forgot that. I could have climbed up and peered at that dog over the back yard wall at any time after but once i was told the tale, i never wanted to see that dog...

next door but one to me had one monty --- jumped out the bedroom window to get at the postman and tried to chase him with 4 broken legs 

Link to post
3 hours ago, gnasher16 said:

Without wishing to sound impolite i will never know why people allow little dogs like that to get so heavy its a massive strain on their joints.

bit over weight for a plummer terrier gnash ..

 

Link to post
10 hours ago, gnasher16 said:

Without wishing to sound impolite i will never know why people allow little dogs like that to get so heavy its a massive strain on their joints.

To be fair some dogs are born fat.I have a chihuahua who was born fat and still is at 13,dieting makes little difference and to get her to a normal weight would mean starving her to death.Always been healthy though.

Link to post
14 hours ago, Aussie Whip said:

To be fair some dogs are born fat.I have a chihuahua who was born fat and still is at 13,dieting makes little difference and to get her to a normal weight would mean starving her to death.Always been healthy though.

Got a Russell bitch the same... She was also a fat pup come to think of it 🤔

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post

Origins of the Staffordshire bull terrier
By Fred Phillips
 
The origins of the Staffordshire bull Terrier have never been told. Although books were written in the 1930’s none have ever given any description of the dog’s and bitche’s our present day dog have originated from. I know that a great deal of controvesy will start when I say; that in my opinion there was very little of the Bull Dog in the make-up of the Stafford. The only thing I think compares the Bull Dog to the Stafford is it’s courage. The old Bulldog’s were more like a Stafford than the present day Bull Dog, but it would be a NIGHTMARE to to-days Stafford breeder if his stock looked anything like a Bull Dog.

The Staffords head should be tight without wrinkle over both skull and foreface and without any sign of lippiness. A lippy dog, if fought,would be in risk of loosing half of his face in the first few seconds of any serious encounter.The essential thing is that a dogs appearance should convey his ability to do his rightful work.,even if he is never fought and only for the show.

The Bull dog’s mouth is undesirable for the Stafford and the prized flews of the Bull Dog are well and truly out when it comes to the Stafford. The dish face and down face, and the head without a stop, should also be avoided.

The White English Terrier, now extinct, had all the similarities of the Stafford, other than showing great strength and power for his size. The head was as clean-cut as the Staffords but not stronge enough or as deep through enough to fit a well balanced Stafford.The head resembled a wedge, were a Stafford should resemble a half brick.The skull and foreface of the English White Terrier were parallel, to each other, thus avoiding either dish or down face, and the stop of a Stafford should be deep as it determines the size and shape of the eye, which should be round and shallow. The foreign eye shapes appear to destroy the typical expression. Ears were small and rose shape, if they were large they were cropped.

The neck of the English was longer than the Stafford without the power needed. The old-timmers wanted a neck of reasonable length and great strength and demanded a crest of the neck. This permitted a wide range of vision without presenting a vulnerable target, and gave the Stafford a regal stance.

The front of a Stafford is of great importance. The legs must be set in line and squarley underneath the shoulders, with the rounded briscket lying snugly between them. The legs should be straight to the pasterns, with the feet turning out a little, this is to allow the dog to brace himself on being attacked and better able to resist being thrown, or bowled over, similar to a wrestler taking a stance. 

The structural efficiency was of great importance to two evenly matched Staffords.Many judges admire the great bredth of chest and shoulders and large head, without determing wether the exhibit is in balance and many broad fronted dogs have what is known as a Buul dog front with no breadth of rib- cage,and no indentation behind the shoulders into the ribs. The Stafford should be nothing like the Buuldog whose shoulders appear to be just tacked with the body slung between them.

Breeders to-day are trying to breed dogs like there terrier ancestors, not like the bulldog which they are supposed to have come from.The faults which are know so noticeable came from the bulldog,not the White English terrier,and I state that the top line should be level,another attribute that is totaly unlike the bulldog,who has a pronounced dip behind the shoulders with a roached back and stern higher than the shoulder.We do not want the straight stifle and hock of the bulldog. When the Stafford is veiwed from behind, the hind legs should be straight in line from hip to foot, again the shape of the terrier with the bone of the bulldog, and without the cowhocks, which were such a feature of the bulldog.

Nice bit of a read. 

Atb j 

  • Like 1
Link to post
On 12/08/2020 at 14:30, The drover said:

Always good to read people's views that hav actually owned one . Going by the replies , I think it's fair to say there are more poor EBTs now than good ones . Isn't it interesting how the Pakistanis have taken the breed forward.  However there doesn't seem to be a particular standard to the gull terriers 

Have they really taken them forward?They rate them bully kuttas that they breed but all the ones Ive personally seen have been complete bags of shit

  • Like 2
Link to post
5 hours ago, Daniel cain said:

Got a Russell bitch the same... She was also a fat pup come to think of it 🤔

The blue and tan female lying down is the one born fat 13,the white is the mother 15,the brown and white the father 15.The bitch had to have a c section because the fat fck was stuck.They are all really healthy still,you wonder how long they can live.The vet commented that the blue pup will always be fat as soon as it was born.The Mrs calls them the three Amigo's.As said you can't get the weight off it,just the way it is.

IMG_E0209 (1).JPG

Link to post
On 15/08/2020 at 18:54, jetro said:

Origins of the Staffordshire bull terrier
By Fred Phillips
 
The origins of the Staffordshire bull Terrier have never been told. Although books were written in the 1930’s none have ever given any description of the dog’s and bitche’s our present day dog have originated from. I know that a great deal of controvesy will start when I say; that in my opinion there was very little of the Bull Dog in the make-up of the Stafford. The only thing I think compares the Bull Dog to the Stafford is it’s courage. The old Bulldog’s were more like a Stafford than the present day Bull Dog, but it would be a NIGHTMARE to to-days Stafford breeder if his stock looked anything like a Bull Dog.

The Staffords head should be tight without wrinkle over both skull and foreface and without any sign of lippiness. A lippy dog, if fought,would be in risk of loosing half of his face in the first few seconds of any serious encounter.The essential thing is that a dogs appearance should convey his ability to do his rightful work.,even if he is never fought and only for the show.

The Bull dog’s mouth is undesirable for the Stafford and the prized flews of the Bull Dog are well and truly out when it comes to the Stafford. The dish face and down face, and the head without a stop, should also be avoided.

The White English Terrier, now extinct, had all the similarities of the Stafford, other than showing great strength and power for his size. The head was as clean-cut as the Staffords but not stronge enough or as deep through enough to fit a well balanced Stafford.The head resembled a wedge, were a Stafford should resemble a half brick.The skull and foreface of the English White Terrier were parallel, to each other, thus avoiding either dish or down face, and the stop of a Stafford should be deep as it determines the size and shape of the eye, which should be round and shallow. The foreign eye shapes appear to destroy the typical expression. Ears were small and rose shape, if they were large they were cropped.

The neck of the English was longer than the Stafford without the power needed. The old-timmers wanted a neck of reasonable length and great strength and demanded a crest of the neck. This permitted a wide range of vision without presenting a vulnerable target, and gave the Stafford a regal stance.

The front of a Stafford is of great importance. The legs must be set in line and squarley underneath the shoulders, with the rounded briscket lying snugly between them. The legs should be straight to the pasterns, with the feet turning out a little, this is to allow the dog to brace himself on being attacked and better able to resist being thrown, or bowled over, similar to a wrestler taking a stance. 

The structural efficiency was of great importance to two evenly matched Staffords.Many judges admire the great bredth of chest and shoulders and large head, without determing wether the exhibit is in balance and many broad fronted dogs have what is known as a Buul dog front with no breadth of rib- cage,and no indentation behind the shoulders into the ribs. The Stafford should be nothing like the Buuldog whose shoulders appear to be just tacked with the body slung between them.

Breeders to-day are trying to breed dogs like there terrier ancestors, not like the bulldog which they are supposed to have come from.The faults which are know so noticeable came from the bulldog,not the White English terrier,and I state that the top line should be level,another attribute that is totaly unlike the bulldog,who has a pronounced dip behind the shoulders with a roached back and stern higher than the shoulder.We do not want the straight stifle and hock of the bulldog. When the Stafford is veiwed from behind, the hind legs should be straight in line from hip to foot, again the shape of the terrier with the bone of the bulldog, and without the cowhocks, which were such a feature of the bulldog.

Nice bit of a read. 

Atb j 

A nice read but smacks of a showman justifying a breed standard. His points make sense but are relating to show points? The original work of the Stafford has long since been illegal of course so function over form has no relevance now regarding breeding but the physical faults listed by Mr. Philips would not necessarily prevent a dog from being a winner, outside of the show ring? The Fox Terrier has a head like an anteater due to the distance from occiput to stop needing to be less than the distance between stop and nose in order to protect the eyes when facing a fox. It probably made sense when they wrote the breed standard.

  • Like 2
Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...