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Slip Lead Or Not


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I'm a midget and own a deerhound so I'm at a disadvantage

Lads it's not rocket science,,,just let the dog off the slip,,,,and try it,,,it's not majic.......

Much easier and more of a pleasure if you can work the dog off the lead ........

i've always used a slip lead in the past, but planning to get my youngster going without.

 

To those that don't use one - d'you give the dog the command to run? Or does the dog decide for itself?

I start pups off on the slip,,,,and as there experience grows,,they kind of learn them selfs,,,,I do tend to give a comand,,I can't help myself,,,,but it's a kind of muffled hissed whisper if you know what I mean,,,and it's always the same two words day or night,,"git on"

 

When I'm lamping and I'm sure most lads are the same,,I quickly cast the lamp over the area and make a mental note of where the bunnys are,,,usually with an experienced dog,,,they know too,,,then pick out your target...

 

I think the important part of the dog training ,,,is the recal and walking at heel,,,I don't mean like one of these circus trained collies or poodles,,,but just walking near you,,,like they would on a walk where there's no game,,,just close by

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I find it very a interesting topic. My pup is as keen as mustard with a lot of drive so the thought of getting him to put the brakes on when he knows there's some thing in front of him should be good.

But he is on sick at the mo so during his rehab will be an ideal time to get a handle on him. I am aiming for next winter hopefully :)

I notice the folks who do train off the lead do it across the board with all the dogs so I guess its doable with any hound with time

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Depends on what sort of area your in and what other animals are about. Not so bad on the dales where it's just rabbits but round my way your more likely to bump into Badgers than a rabbit. Hence the dog stays on a slip. Tess will happily work without a slip when it's just rabbits about and I'll hiss to send her down the beam.

 

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i've always used a slip lead in the past, but planning to get my youngster going without.

 

To those that don't use one - d'you give the dog the command to run? Or does the dog decide for itself?

I start pups off on the slip,,,,and as there experience grows,,they kind of learn them selfs,,,,I do tend to give a comand,,I can't help myself,,,,but it's a kind of muffled hissed whisper if you know what I mean,,,and it's always the same two words day or night,,"git on"

When I'm lamping and I'm sure most lads are the same,,I quickly cast the lamp over the area and make a mental note of where the bunnys are,,,usually with an experienced dog,,,they know too,,,then pick out your target...

I think the important part of the dog training ,,,is the recal and walking at heel,,,I don't mean like one of these circus trained collies or poodles,,,but just walking near you,,,like they would on a walk where there's no game,,,just close by

Think everyone's command is the same!!! Imagine shouting...... "Abracadabra?!?"

 

As long as the dog is no more than 5-10 yards in front I'm happy with that, dog is always interested in the beam but unless I hiss them on or give lamp a wee shake then she's not expecting anything to be running. If that makes sense?

Edited by RossM
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Guy down the pub told me if you need a lead your no good at training dogs

you're never out off that boozer
Only pop in at happy hour mate, the 2 for 1 meals are good quality

 

Kin el, are you related to jerry *******attrick?!

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So the lads that lamp there dogs of the slip can walk up to a squatter with there dog at heel then give the command and away it goes Or are there dogs away out in front?

To be fair mate, a dog with experience on the lamp shouldn't need walked right up on a squatter, it should be trusting you that there's something at the end of the beam and picking it out its clamp.

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As Others have said, when on your own off lead. When in company on a full lead till it's their turn to run, no slip leads just a full lead or off lead. Slip leads lead to accidents. (pun intended)

 

TC

Genuine question, why do slip leads lead to accidents ?

 

By the very nature of the lead, it is meant to let a dog loose with minimum fuss. One dog is coursing a rabbit and the rabbit runs back towards you, the one on the slip naturally wants to get in on the action and starts bouncing around it is then that slip leads can fail and lets the dog loose. If you have a full lead on the dog it is less likely to happen.

 

TC

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Depends on what sort of area your in and what other animals are about. Not so bad on the dales where it's just rabbits but round my way your more likely to bump into Badgers than a rabbit. Hence the dog stays on a slip. Tess will happily work without a slip when it's just rabbits about and I'll hiss to send her down the beam.

I bump in to Billy's up on the dales from time to time,,,,but where I live here in Nottinghamshire is full of Billy's ,,,in fact there are active sets not 300 yard from my back door,,,

 

I regular bump in to them on dusk walks,,,but after bumping in to them on regular basis,,the dogs soon learn not to feck around with them....but then my dogs are just rabbit dogs

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