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Training a Saluki x Greyhound pup


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27 minutes ago, oblivious said:

At the moment he's with me all the time which i'm hoping will help in the long run. 

 

Have you got any advice on stock training? I'm planning to take him somewhere where there are sheep and give a tug on the lead and a 'No' if he shows interest. And just keep doing that until he shows no interest in them. I know I need to get this cracked early to prevent problems in the future.

That's what I do with stock. Yeah bond, bond, bond imo.

Rather than tell him off for chewing, give him something he can chew. I've used that stuff for stopping humans chewing their nails in the past

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This lad is saluki saturated,and the most biddable dog ever,until he's on the chase then it's futile calling him lol...I've had a few saluki X ,and the only one that busted my balls is the pure bred I

youll be lucky to get good recall when its 12 years old , never mind 12 weeks  , its got sal in it  , selective hearing is in there dna ....

Patchy recall from a saluki type is normal you have a pup with all sight hound breeds he will be hard work especially when 12 to 16 month when he has more bravery to wander further away I say let a pu

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2 hours ago, oblivious said:

Thanks bud, really appreciate the advice.

With the tug training - is there a risk that could make him a bit hard mouthed and less likely to let me have rabbits off him that he's caught in the future? 

No, just watch a few YouTube videos. Train to release on command. 

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This lad is saluki saturated,and the most biddable dog ever,until he's on the chase then it's futile calling him lol...I've had a few saluki X ,and the only one that busted my balls is the pure bred I have now,but I'm hoping all that's in the past too now

IMG_20211121_101655.jpg

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2 hours ago, sandymere said:

No, just watch a few YouTube videos. Train to release on command. 

Best not train the release too soon as it puts some pups off tugging altogether. You can let the dog pullit out of your hands regularly to build it's drive for the game and if you play with the pup on a long lead it can't feck off with the tug. Use the lead to gently encourage the pup to bring the tug to you and the game resumes. If/when the pup starts to get keen, watch out for your fingers.

Think of it as a game between you and the pup rather than between the pup and the tug.

When you want the tug back you have to hold it solid lifeless and immovable. The pup will then let go. I crouch down and brace my forearms on my knees.

You'll probably need to start with something soft like an old child's sock stuffed with other socks.

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36 minutes ago, Maximus Ferret said:

Best not train the release too soon as it puts some pups off tugging altogether. You can let the dog pullit out of your hands regularly to build it's drive for the game and if you play with the pup on a long lead it can't feck off with the tug. Use the lead to gently encourage the pup to bring the tug to you and the game resumes. If/when the pup starts to get keen, watch out for your fingers.

Think of it as a game between you and the pup rather than between the pup and the tug.

When you want the tug back you have to hold it solid lifeless and immovable. The pup will then let go. I crouch down and brace my forearms on my knees.

You'll probably need to start with something soft like an old child's sock stuffed with other socks.

Thanks mate, I've been doing a bit of research into the tug thing today and found this article. The principles of it all make sense i.e working with the dog's drive and increasing the dog's desire to be around you etc

 

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A lot of good replies so far.

One thing: You said he chews the sofa arms and you reward him when he stops.

Alternatively you can give him something else to chew on e.g. a kong/toy/chicken feet/rabbit sinews. 
It is not all about positive enforcement, it is also about providing alternatives and setting up the environment so that your pup has it easy to be successful.

Don’t stress yourself too much, you will have plenty of good and bad days with your dog. Sometimes you will think that it goes backwards, thats totally normal.

In the end, positivity and consistency will prevail.

Cheers MagyarAgar

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1 hour ago, MagyarAgar said:

A lot of good replies so far.

One thing: You said he chews the sofa arms and you reward him when he stops.

Alternatively you can give him something else to chew on e.g. a kong/toy/chicken feet/rabbit sinews. 
It is not all about positive enforcement, it is also about providing alternatives and setting up the environment so that your pup has it easy to be successful.

Don’t stress yourself too much, you will have plenty of good and bad days with your dog. Sometimes you will think that it goes backwards, thats totally normal.

In the end, positivity and consistency will prevail.

Cheers MagyarAgar

Cheers bud, i've had a lot of good replies on here now which are really helpful. 

I'll try and get him redirected onto things he is allowed to chew, especially now that he'll start teething soon.

Thanks for the reassurance too mate, I'm sure me and him will get there 👍

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4 hours ago, Aussie Whip said:

What's wrong with giving the pup a clip if it's chewing your $4000 dollar lounge? Mother dogs discipline their pups pretty hard according to breed. As long as you don't do it in anger it's not going to make the pup hate or fear you, same with kids. 

In my opinion there is nothing inherently wrong with it.
But it is just way to easy to do it wrong, from a timing and intensity perspective. So for me it is just not worth it. Verbal and physical presence is enough for me.

Besides most mother dogs stop their puppies by growling (verbal, "stop it you little wanker") or physical presence (pushing between two puppies that go at each other to fiercely). Clipping them is reserved for later times when they are older, and even then only seldom. Not at 10 weeks.

To each their own.

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13 minutes ago, MagyarAgar said:

In my opinion there is nothing inherently wrong with it.
But it is just way to easy to do it wrong, from a timing and intensity perspective. So for me it is just not worth it. Verbal and physical presence is enough for me.

Besides most mother dogs stop their puppies by growling (verbal, "stop it you little wanker") or physical presence (pushing between two puppies that go at each other to fiercely). Clipping them is reserved for later times when they are older, and even then only seldom. Not at 10 weeks.

To each their own.

I agree, with the whippets a harsh word is enough. My old pit bitch would throw her pups across the yard at 5weeks, she didn't hurt them and was a good mother but they were hard dogs and a growl didn't cut it, lol. I'd rather give them a reminder when young and you never have to when they grow.

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17 hours ago, Aussie Whip said:

What's wrong with giving the pup a clip if it's chewing your $4000 dollar lounge? Mother dogs discipline their pups pretty hard according to breed. As long as you don't do it in anger it's not going to make the pup hate or fear you, same with kids. 

i just scruff em mate back of the neck 

 

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