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1 hour ago, Gypsydog94 said:

A lot depends on its style I think. If it’s a do or die animal it will be lucky to reach retirement. 

you mean  a thick animal lol 

do or die that one a them just runs in to things lol

Edited by mC HULL
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How long is a piece of string ? When a working dog is at its peak surely depends on its type, breed, when it was started, what work it's does, what quarry it runs and on what type of land. M

EXCELLENT WRITE UP BOSUN 11 SPOT ON WHAT YOU SAY, IN MY BOOK, IF YOUR DOGS HAVE GIVEN YOU THEIR ALL OVER LONG YEARS THEY STILL DESERVE GOOD FOOD, A WARM BED, AND DEVOTION FROM YOU,IF YOUR A TRUE DOGMA

Cant beat do or die f..k they thinkers running about with there heads in the air 

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4 minutes ago, nothernlite said:

Cant beat do or die f..k they thinkers running about with there heads in the air 

do or die lol has me laughing everytime lol 

what does it mean ? lol

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Nothing kills older dogs better than retirement...

As Charts and others have said, there are so many variables in this subject BUT keep them at it for as long as you can and you will have a fit and healthy dog, sure it may not have the speed it did in its youth, but expierience and cunning it will have-a-plenty and you can't buy that..!!

I had my first dog still catching at 14 years old and fool that i was, i stopped taking her because i was getting ripped by my 'mates'. I broke her heart, leaving without her and taking other dogs out and within a few months her health faded and she died...

Another tale about age, was my mates old deerhoundy lurcher Jet. At 12 my mate had retired Jet to a house dog but he was out all day with his kids. He got some sort of kidney problem and my mate thought it was time to call it a day. He hadn't the heart to go to the vet but rather give him a last slip on the Lydiate fields of Altcar estate, where Jet had killed many a hare in his prime and that would finish him off.

Well, i went with him to do the deed and 'ol Jet looked very worse for wear loaded into the motor but on arrival his demina changed, his stride opened up and he somehow looked 'a bit better' walking over to that field... So that hare got up and Jet was slipped and the old bugger caught that hare after two turns and went on to live his fireside life for a few years more...

Them old 'uns can surprise you sometimes... 😉

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18 minutes ago, Bosun11 said:

Nothing kills older dogs faster than retirement...

As Charts and others have said, there are so many variables in this subject BUT keep them at it for as long as you can and you will have a fit and healthy dog, sure it may not have the speed it did in its youth, but expierience and cunning it will have-a-plenty and you can't buy that..!!

I had my first dog still catching at 14 years old and fool that i was, i stopped taking it because i was getting ripped by my 'mates'. Sad as it was i broke her heart, leaving without her and within a few months her health faded and she died...

Another tale about age, was my mates old deerhoundy lurcher Jet. At 12 my mate had retired him to a house dog but he was out all day with his kids. He got some sort of kidney problem and my mate thought it was time to call it a day. He hadn't the heart to go to the vet but rather give him a last slip on the Lydiate fields of Altcar estate, where Jet had killed many a hare in his prime and that would finish him off.

Well, i went with him to do the deed and 'ol Jet looked very worse for wear loaded into the motor but on arrival his demina changed, his stride opened up and he somehow looked 'a bit better' walking over to that field... So that hare got up and Jet was slipped and the old bugger caught that hare after two turns and went on to live his fireside life for a few years more...

Them old 'uns can surprise you sometimes... 😉

Nice write up mate, enjoyed that one👍

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Dogs are like people, each has its own biological clock but keeping them going rather than leaving on the coach as they age will keep them healthier, the aim is to add healthy years rather than total years be that 10 or 20 for a dog or 60 to a 100 for us and hope that you stay healthy until the day you wake up dead in the morning.👍

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35 minutes ago, mC HULL said:

what is it then lol 

do or die lol

cant even explain what your saying lol

 

for me it means a dog that tries at everything every time. rabbits sat at side of hedge, it doesn't think about it, still tries for them. it also doesn't start applying brakes yards from cover either. often hits cover to catch it's quarry. far better than a clever thinking dog that picks its runs. 

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I’ve not really read all the previous replies so it might have been said....... but there are a large variety of factors. In ‘theory’ a good running dog is in its prime at the age of 4-5. Someone once said to me it takes two years to get a dog to be the complete article, it then takes two more years to get that dog to fully practice and hone its craft, and then two years where it’s the complete and practiced article and still running like a good un, then you get two years before the dog is old. Don’t know if that’s true really but it makes sense. 
 

Having said that, I’ve never really managed to get a dog as far as it’s middle years without a variety of injuries that slow it down, and I’ve only managed to get one dog as far as retirement yet, all the rest haven’t made old bones, sadly. 

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Does anyone rub down their dogs after exercise, will this help reduce stiffness and soreness? Do you put coats on your dogs after a nights lamping or just put them in the kennel. Is there any more preventative measures that can be used to help. 

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8 minutes ago, Allan P said:

Does anyone rub down their dogs after exercise, will this help reduce stiffness and soreness? Do you put coats on your dogs after a nights lamping or just put them in the kennel. Is there any more preventative measures that can be used to help. 

If I’ve had a decent nights lamping with the dog and it’s had a good bit of rough and tumble, when I get home I take him into the kitchen, give him a rub down, bathe his feet in warm salty water and sort out any other bits that might need attention. Then give him a good feed, if it’s a cold winter, often it’s a bit of a warm stew type thing. Then he usually lounges on the mat in the kitchen while I have a beer and a smoke, then it’s back in the kennel. Kennel boxes are insulated with kingspan and usually full of decent barley straw so plenty warm. Dog usually sleeps during the day and is usually bouncing and ready to go the next night. 

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3 minutes ago, SheepChaser said:

If I’ve had a decent nights lamping with the dog and it’s had a good bit of rough and tumble, when I get home I take him into the kitchen, give him a rub down, bathe his feet in warm salty water and sort out any other bits that might need attention. Then give him a good feed, if it’s a cold winter, often it’s a bit of a warm stew type thing. Then he usually lounges on the mat in the kitchen while I have a beer and a smoke, then it’s back in the kennel. Kennel boxes are insulated with kingspan and usually full of decent barley straw so plenty warm. Dog usually sleeps during the day and is usually bouncing and ready to go the next night. 

You not get trouble with mites in the barley straw? 

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