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22 minutes ago, two crows said:

I appreciate what your saying mate and  variety is the spice of the lurcher world , during the 90's when coursing clubs were common there was still lads running collie crosses, greyhounds allsorts of things, but but by the end they all saw the light, you need to have some chance of success to enjoy any sport, and not all saluki lurchers are champions, far from it and brown hares don't role over easy.  with regard to galgos what is there ancestry, and is the Spanish hare same as ours.

Yes it's the same hare and their ancestry is chasing hares since pre biblical times. 😉

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the hare while quick off the mark, has fantastic stamina and can not be classed as a sprinter, and a coursing lurcher must poses this to stand any chance of being a consistent hare catcher, the saluki

No excuse for baiting

The rag heads have hunted the deserts to emptyness and 99.9% of those runs are with dropped game,load of old shite all of it if you ask me and i'd rather watch paint dry..

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The History of the Galgo

Many theories exist as to the lineage of the Spanish galgo — it is a sighthound mix, possibly Irish greyhound and sloughi or deerhound. The galgo is an ancient breed, named for the Gauls, a Celtic tribe that lived in the Iberian Peninsula the sixth century BC. It is thought that the Celts, who appreciated fine hunting dogs, acquired sighthounds from the Phoenician merchants who plied the Spanish coasts. The Moors, who conquered Spain in the eighth century, may have bred African sighthounds with Spanish galgos. Most of the galgos used for hunting today are mixed with Irish racing greyhounds or other breeds to produce a fast coursing dog.

Originally brought to Spain by noblepersons, the galgo was held in high esteem. After decades of theft and indiscriminate breeding by the lower classes, the galgo lost its favor and was — and still is — viewed as a "trash dog," owned only by the lower classes. The galgo was bred for hunting and coursing and is an elegant sighthound. The unscrupulous breeding brought with it beautiful variations in color, coat and size. The coats range from short hair (like that of a greyhound), to varying degrees of long and wirehair coats, as seen in the Scottish deerhound and other sighthounds. The galgo is a sighthound similar to the racing greyhound, although they are generally smaller. The purebred Galgo Español is 44-70 pounds and stands 23-29 inches at the shoulder.

Like all sighthounds, the galgo is fast and agile. They tend to be very playful and have more energy than their racing counterparts. Although some have a high prey drive, many live peacefully with cats. Galgos generally do best living with others dogs as they are used to living in close quarters with others of their breed. They are capable of jumping fences and must always be leashed when outside an enclosed area. Due to lack of socializing and positive experiences with people when young, galgos can be leery of people at first. However, they bond strongly with their adoptive families and the emergence of their comical personalities is a wonderful experience!

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13 minutes ago, two crows said:

The History of the Galgo

Many theories exist as to the lineage of the Spanish galgo — it is a sighthound mix, possibly Irish greyhound and sloughi or deerhound. The galgo is an ancient breed, named for the Gauls, a Celtic tribe that lived in the Iberian Peninsula the sixth century BC. It is thought that the Celts, who appreciated fine hunting dogs, acquired sighthounds from the Phoenician merchants who plied the Spanish coasts. The Moors, who conquered Spain in the eighth century, may have bred African sighthounds with Spanish galgos. Most of the galgos used for hunting today are mixed with Irish racing greyhounds or other breeds to produce a fast coursing dog.

Originally brought to Spain by noblepersons, the galgo was held in high esteem. After decades of theft and indiscriminate breeding by the lower classes, the galgo lost its favor and was — and still is — viewed as a "trash dog," owned only by the lower classes. The galgo was bred for hunting and coursing and is an elegant sighthound. The unscrupulous breeding brought with it beautiful variations in color, coat and size. The coats range from short hair (like that of a greyhound), to varying degrees of long and wirehair coats, as seen in the Scottish deerhound and other sighthounds. The galgo is a sighthound similar to the racing greyhound, although they are generally smaller. The purebred Galgo Español is 44-70 pounds and stands 23-29 inches at the shoulder.

Like all sighthounds, the galgo is fast and agile. They tend to be very playful and have more energy than their racing counterparts. Although some have a high prey drive, many live peacefully with cats. Galgos generally do best living with others dogs as they are used to living in close quarters with others of their breed. They are capable of jumping fences and must always be leashed when outside an enclosed area. Due to lack of socializing and positive experiences with people when young, galgos can be leery of people at first. However, they bond strongly with their adoptive families and the emergence of their comical personalities is a wonderful experience!

The coursing galgos tend to be pure as they tried crossing with racers but found they lost stamina and ability to run the hard ground. They are very proud of their ancestry as coursing rather than racing dogs. Tracks use both sorts and hybrids are advertised but only pures can be entered into coursing competitions.:thumbs:

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5 hours ago, low plains drifter said:

Some of the saluki lurchers have got back legs like tops of beef and can run til the cows come home and then some  :laugh:

Maybe the coursing dogs that are x with greyhound do, but pure saluki do not have sprinters muscles because they aint

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26 minutes ago, Busher100 said:

Maybe the coursing dogs that are x with greyhound do, but pure saluki do not have sprinters muscles because they aint

the line bred coursing dogs that are common today are almost a separate dog to a straight hybrid, so do show more muscle than pure saluki, and to be honest if  you could work out the percentages because of out crossing to pure sal from time to time, they must be nearly all saluki just better for here.

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3 hours ago, fireman said:

I was saying it's just what i think,if i was a pure chaser of the hare i'd have a native bred dog for doing so with,not knocking those that do with what ever dog they want to it just ain't for me....

Just to add for my own lurcher has saluki,bull and belgium mally blood in her:laugh: so it isn't i have issues with foreign blooded dogs,i'd just use a native bred dog if i was a coursing man...

fair enough but the brown hare isn't native, the two we can still work aren't either

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46 minutes ago, Gilbey said:

fair enough but the brown hare isn't native, the two we can still work aren't either

The brown hare is native all over europe with some species variances (e.g. pyranean hare, mountain). So yes it is native and has been since Blighty was attached to europe, during the last ice age 👍

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8 hours ago, mushroom said:

The brown hare is native all over europe with some species variances (e.g. pyranean hare, mountain). So yes it is native and has been since Blighty was attached to europe, during the last ice age 👍

whites are native browns aren't lol

edited "species variances" two different hares

Edited by Gilbey
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51 minutes ago, mushroom said:

The brown hare is native all over europe with some species variances (e.g. pyranean hare, mountain). So yes it is native and has been since Blighty was attached to europe, during the last ice age 👍

Correct sir. Not everything was introduced to britain by the romans :thumbs:

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2 minutes ago, edrd said:

Ugly things sandy very thin on the coat to but impressive stanima how game are they 

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder 😉.Bitch has had a good season taking various stuff, plenty of drive.

You can get rough as well as smooth although the smooth are more common due to climate.

Probably odd one here.

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.milanuncios.com/anuncios/galgo-capote.htm&ved=2ahUKEwib7-OplOLZAhVEIJoKHRWCAO0QFjAMegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw1kzMcIuT28Q6jxKvS0bLeV

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