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Using A Sire Twice In A Row


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I've got pups here off a repeat mating and the pups off the second litter are twice the animals.

 

The first litter must have been good Dillydog if it was repeated.

If the second litter was much better then that shows that repeat matings can be different. Whether for good or bad.

 

I think you'll find all litters are different it has nothing to do with how many consecutive breeding's a pair makes

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Honestly ,how many of you have ever done the repeat mating because appears to be a lot of 'my mate did' or 'i once knew ' . Pity topics like this wernt confined to fact not hearsay or classroom theor

There lies the answer.     Statistically with the same Sire & Dam with an even number of offspring the results should be the same and quality of pups the same. Varying Environmental condition

I've heard this a lot mostly from old timers and I've come to the conclusion that's it's an old wives tale imho . I've seen breeding done in fowl where the turnover and results can be seen a lot quick

Sorry Corkman, but I don't buy theories figured out in a laboratory.

If dog breeding could be worked out on a piece of paper then we'd all have great dogs and there wouldn't be a wild mammal left in our countryside.

I'd rather listen to the men who's lab is their yard and the testing ground.

 

Like I say, most of us will repeat a mating or two in their yards but in the past there's been lads who done it many times and stopped doing so.

Personally I wouldn't do it but would look to breed the same bitch back to a closely related dog.

It also helps your breeding in the future to do so IMO. It widens your terriers gene pool to do so.

JMHO and that's all it is, an opinion.

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I've got pups here off a repeat mating and the pups off the second litter are twice the animals.

The first litter must have been good Dillydog if it was repeated.

If the second litter was much better then that shows that repeat matings can be different. Whether for good or bad.

 

I think you'll find all litters are different it has nothing to do with how many consecutive breeding's a pair makes

 

Absolutely, that's why it's not a sure fire recipe for success if the first litter was great.

 

BUT, on the flip side of my argument, how many times if the first litter were curs would a second litter have worked out ????????

That is one gamble I would not make.

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The pups from my first litter were poor, three dogs worked and one bitch but they were all VERY slow to mature. The pups from the second litter are stronger, bigger and were cocking their legs at six months, the dog I have from the first litter is three and has just started to cock his leg.

No one has got all the answers, I totally agree with Neil on his views.

I've had thirty plus years on the bank and all I can say is every dog is an individual so no amount of theorising would make you any the wiser.

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The pups from my first litter were poor, three dogs worked and one bitch but they were all VERY slow to mature. The pups from the second litter are stronger, bigger and were cocking their legs at six months, the dog I have from the first litter is three and has just started to cock his leg.

No one has got all the answers, I totally agree with Neil on his views.

I've had thirty plus years on the bank and all I can say is every dog is an individual so no amount of theorising would make you any the wiser.

four workers in the first litter mate I'd a good consistent number of worker to throw ! How many workers where in the second litter ? I would say good blood throws good pups regardless of how forward the pups are, and they sounds like it worked both times around to me !
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The pups are still pups mate, seven or eight months old. They're marking places now and ragging fresh kills. I took them to try for a few rats the other day, one was busy digging, the other was rolling in shit.

I'll let you know towards the end of this season if I get round to starting them in a pisser somewhere.

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The pups are still pups mate, seven or eight months old. They're marking places now and ragging fresh kills. I took them to try for a few rats the other day, one was busy digging, the other was rolling in shit.

I'll let you know towards the end of this season if I get round to starting them in a pisser somewhere.

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The pups from my first litter were poor, three dogs worked and one bitch but they were all VERY slow to mature. The pups from the second litter are stronger, bigger and were cocking their legs at six months, the dog I have from the first litter is three and has just started to cock his leg.

No one has got all the answers, I totally agree with Neil on his views.

I've had thirty plus years on the bank and all I can say is every dog is an individual so no amount of theorising would make you any the wiser.

Dili,

 

The Cork sense of humour is an acquired taste and lost on some. All theories are just that - theories and need to be proven in reality. Since I was younger I have questioned many a dog man of various types of working dogs of which I could see with my own eyes were producing the goods. The answers I got varied from brilliant to disappointing and I always took something away in the memory bank. In saying all that many of these theories have borne fruit from everything from garden peas to horses, cows, chickens and dogs. The lads that are producing results for the most part are not guessing or why else would many of us breed related animals? Maybe the cull down the road would provide hybrid vigor ;-)

I work my dogs weekly during the season so any theory I may have gets well tested in the field where it counts.

Going back to my original post environment, condition and genetic inheritance obviously varys from litter to litter even the exact same way bred as you and many others have experienced..... You can try to reduce the odds in our favour but the odds are always out there to ruin our best made plans.

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The pups from my first litter were poor, three dogs worked and one bitch but they were all VERY slow to mature. The pups from the second litter are stronger, bigger and were cocking their legs at six months, the dog I have from the first litter is three and has just started to cock his leg.

No one has got all the answers, I totally agree with Neil on his views.

I've had thirty plus years on the bank and all I can say is every dog is an individual so no amount of theorising would make you any the wiser.

Dili,

 

The Cork sense of humour is an acquired taste and lost on some. All theories are just that - theories and need to be proven in reality. Since I was younger I have questioned many a dog man of various types of working dogs of which I could see with my own eyes were producing the goods. The answers I got varied from brilliant to disappointing and I always took something away in the memory bank. In saying all that many of these theories have borne fruit from everything from garden peas to horses, cows, chickens and dogs. The lads that are producing results for the most part are not guessing or why else would many of us breed related animals? Maybe the cull down the road would provide hybrid vigor ;-)

I work my dogs weekly during the season so any theory I may have gets well tested in the field where it counts.

Going back to my original post environment, condition and genetic inheritance obviously varys from litter to litter even the exact same way bred as you and many others have experienced..... You can try to reduce the odds in our favour but the odds are always out there to ruin our best made plans.

agreed, breeding is a lottery, all you can do is increase your chances.
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If everyone is talking about the same breeding here then it is very cut and dried although I suspect some arnt .The second or third litter to unrelated stock is IMO a lottery but within tight breeding ,I've seen nothing to suggest its not good but then again I've done nothing else so don't really have a benchmark to suggest otherwise .The only average I've seen is smaller litters but no bad thing really .

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Sorry Corkman, but I don't buy theories figured out in a laboratory.

If dog breeding could be worked out on a piece of paper then we'd all have great dogs and there wouldn't be a wild mammal left in our countryside.

I'd rather listen to the men who's lab is their yard and the testing ground.

 

Like I say, most of us will repeat a mating or two in their yards but in the past there's been lads who done it many times and stopped doing so.

Personally I wouldn't do it but would look to breed the same bitch back to a closely related dog.

It also helps your breeding in the future to do so IMO. It widens your terriers gene pool to do so.

JMHO and that's all it is, an opinion.

 

They're doing interesting things with horses at the minute based on labwork

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