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micky

BRICKWORK PRICE ,DAYWORK ????????

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I

have been asked to build the foundations for two posh houses  in Leicestershire the Builder  cannot get a Bricklayer for Love nor Money , its not very straight forward and I think a lot of young Fellahs would struggle with it !  I owe this man nothing though he pays up on the Nail , what should I ask for ?  Cash Per Day ?

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Hod carriers are on close to £200 around Oxfordshire, on site work. 

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4 minutes ago, liP said:

Hod carriers are on close to £200 around Oxfordshire, on site work. 

Jeezz wish I were younger I carried the hod for a well known house builder in the 90s and it was all ladder no loading bays.lol

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3 minutes ago, tatsblisters said:

Jeezz wish I were younger I carried the hod for a well known house builder in the 90s and it was all ladder no loading bays.lol

All forklift and silos nowadays, just hod from bay to spot boards apparently. 

Best mate a bricky , reckons you can't find decent hoddies for love or money. A lot of the ones they come across like to dabble in the powder too "keeps em going". 

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15 minutes ago, liP said:

All forklift and silos nowadays, just hod from bay to spot boards apparently. 

Best mate a bricky , reckons you can't find decent hoddies for love or money. A lot of the ones they come across like to dabble in the powder too "keeps em going". 

I used to have two hods one for bricks and blocks and one for gobo and a mixing point with a diesel mixer with sand a pallet of big bags of cement two 45 gallon drums full of water and a bottle of fairy liquid lol sounds like hod carrying's not a bad number these days.lol

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30 minutes ago, tatsblisters said:

I used to have two hods one for bricks and blocks and one for gobo and a mixing point with a diesel mixer with sand a pallet of big bags of cement two 45 gallon drums full of water and a bottle of fairy liquid lol sounds like hod carrying's not a bad number these days.lol

That's how I remember it when I used to work on site. 👍

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1 hour ago, tatsblisters said:

I used to have two hods one for bricks and blocks and one for gobo and a mixing point with a diesel mixer with sand a pallet of big bags of cement two 45 gallon drums full of water and a bottle of fairy liquid lol sounds like hod carrying's not a bad number these days.lol

Same as that mate, used to look after 3 brickies back in the early 90s for £30 a day......I was happy of it too, work was hard to find.

My pals used to say “I wouldn’t do all that work for that” and guess what?....they were skint all the time ! Lol 

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Just now, WILF said:

Same as that mate, used to look after 3 brickies back in the early 90s for £30 a day......I was happy of it too, work was hard to find.

My pals used to say “I wouldn’t do all that work for that” and guess what?....they were skint all the time ! Lol 

Same here most of my hod carrying was cash in hand till I went with a gang on 30pct split on sc 60.A mate from London when I saw his hod in his van it only had a short shaft on it and was told it was the norm with southern hod carriers.

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10 minutes ago, tatsblisters said:

Same here most of my hod carrying was cash in hand till I went with a gang on 30pct split on sc 60.A mate from London when I saw his hod in his van it only had a short shaft on it and was told it was the norm with southern hod carriers.

Yep, always cut down.

My career ended rather acrimoniously as two of the Brickies were chopsy fuckers trying to be smart all the time.

Lost my rag one day and tried to chop one of thems head off with a shovel, I was chasing them all round the scaffold of a block of flats.....must have looked comical to any spectators lol 

That’s may have been the time I got the idea that a real job may not be for me! Lol 

 

Edited by WILF
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North Yorkshire prices average at mo are..

£25ph daywork but I go price all the time,

trench blocks 1.70

4” 1.50

commons 450 per thou 

face 580 per thou 

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3 hours ago, WILF said:

Same as that mate, used to look after 3 brickies back in the early 90s for £30 a day......I was happy of it too, work was hard to find.

My pals used to say “I wouldn’t do all that work for that” and guess what?....they were skint all the time ! Lol 

Used to Hod myself for a year early around 94'

No lifts ect all up a ladder Hod of bricks and buckets of muck.

You were fit as fire without realising it.

 

£30 per day down the smoke seems a bit thin.

I was getting more up here Wilf.

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I hodded in the 70s. I honestly thought it was easy. Youngsters have a natural fitness and resilience . I used to play football, train and run after work and thought nothing of it. Got arthritis in my neck now though. Possibly due to compression of the discs carrying the hod??

If you abuse your body when you are young, it will bite you in the arse when you get older. One thing I've noticed is guys who put a lot of weight have sore knees and end up sat in a chair putting more weight on.Vicious circle.

Micky you never owe whoever  you pays anything. Get as much as you possibly can. Same as the employer is doing.

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