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hideandshoot

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About hideandshoot

  • Rank
    Born Hunter

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Foulridge, Lancashire
  • Interests
    Shooting (shotguns)
    Rabbiting with Ferrets & Lurchurs
    Trapping

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  1. hideandshoot

    Vasectomised Hob Required

    Hi All, Does anyone have a vasectomised hob they no longer require. Happy to pay a fair price (depending on age). I'm near Colne in Lancashire, but willing to travel up to an hour or so by car. Alternatively, does anyone have one I could borrow to knock my two jills out of season. Again, happy to pay for the service. I would also give you a deposit as security. I've also got a spare polecat jill (born last year) if anyone wants it.
  2. Vasectomised Hob Wanted (near Colne, Lancashire) View Advert Hi All, Does anyone have a vasectomised hob they no longer require. Happy to pay a fair price (depending on age). I'm near Colne in Lancashire, but willing to travel up to an hour by car. Alternatively, does anyone have one I could use to knock my jills out of season when the time arises. Again, happy to pay for the service. Advertiser hideandshoot Date 17/03/19 Price Category Ferreting Equipment  
  3. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • WANTED
    • USED

    Hi All, Does anyone have a vasectomised hob they no longer require. Happy to pay a fair price (depending on age). I'm near Colne in Lancashire, but willing to travel up to an hour by car. Alternatively, does anyone have one I could use to knock my jills out of season when the time arises. Again, happy to pay for the service.

    Free

  4. Hi All, Does anyone have a vasectomised hob they no longer require. Happy to pay a fair price (depending on age). I'm near Colne in Lancashire, but willing to travel up to an hour by car. Alternatively, does anyone have one I could use to knock my jills out of season when the time arises. Again, happy to pay for the service.
  5. hideandshoot

    Water bottles LOL

    Put a small handfull of sand in your water bottles and shake them for a few seconds - hey presto, algae gone.
  6. hideandshoot

    Hob ferret back legs not working

    I had five kits from one of my jills this summer. I had to knock one on the head because its back legs had gone. They all looked OK when they first started venturing from the nest box, but I soon realised one of them had a dickie back end. A mate of mine had a whole litter like this 15 years ago. I thought it may have been some kind of deficiency.
  7. hideandshoot

    greyhound ferrets

    I always understood a greyhound ferret to be a small, sleek, type - usually albinos. I once had a ferret, back in the early 1980's, which I understood to be a greyhound type, it was very small and thin, but a great little worker. It was so small I called it Mouse. It rarely killed below ground as it always seemed to push the bunnies out, probably too small to hold them down (although stoats seem to manage). Ideal for the small burrows (1-8 holes) typical of east Lancashire in the days when ferret finders were an unaffordable school boy's dream. I always though the term 'greyhound' was misleading as greyhounds are large dogs, but I guess it referred to the slenderness and underground speed. I still prefer the smaller, sleek types to this day.
  8. hideandshoot

    Pipe/Ducting for Ferret Run

    You can buy un-perforated land drainage pipe which is better as you don't get daylight entering through the drainage slits. Black is also best colour as the white and yellow pipes let some daylight through - I guess you want it as realistic (in a light sense) as a rabbit burrow. 100mm (4") diameter is fine, but don't go any smaller. You can buy it online at https://www.draindepot.co.uk/100mm-x-25m-unperforated-land-drain-coil.html You'll also pick the perforated variety up at most agricultural stores and builder's merchants. Most farms and building sites also have part rolls kicking about.
  9. hideandshoot

    2 Jills & 1 Litter in the Same Cage?

    Great advice guys. I feel more confident now keeping them all together, which is what I preferred to do anyway. I've already got two nest boxes in the cage so that may reduce any potential stress between the jills. Tsteve999 - I assume the 20 kits you mentioned was the result of multiple litters and not just from a single jill? The most I've witnessed was 14 kits in one litter, but my personal best is only 9. I guess I'd prefer half a dozen strong kits than a large litter which the jill may struggle to adequately nourish. I'll offer any surplus kits on here FOC, so long as any takers don't live within 5 miles Thanks again
  10. I have two jills (sisters) which are housed together in a large cage, and they have not been separated since they were born 3 years ago. I would like to breed from one of them, but not both as I only have homes for 3-4 kits. I only have the one cage which is a large two-storey affair, so I guess I could simply block-off the chute which connects the two levels and add a sleeping box to the lower level, effectively making it in to 2 cages. Is this really necessary though? I'm wondering if the jill which isn't mated will become a kind of foster mother if they are put back together after mating and kept in the same cage during and after the birth. I've kept ferrets for a number of years, and always understood that any interference (of any sort) with a new litter could result in the litter being abandoned or eaten, however the 2 jills are sisters so may be happy to share. In fact they might only be half sisters as they are themselves the result of two simultaneous litters in the same nest, so I guess communal parenting is not normally an issue. So the question is, should I separate them or keep them together? And if I separate them, when is the best time to do this? Any advice or similar experiences would be appreciated.
  11. hideandshoot

    paper or wood shavings

    I've harvested barley also, and shovelled tonnes of the stuff by hand, and you're right, barley grain does make you itch. I guess it has something to do with the summer heat and perspiration as well. However, barley straw doesn't make me itch, and it's relatively dust free. I've even slept in straw-filled barns - when I was younger - without itching, and most people have sat on barley straw bales at some time or other without itching (country shows, pigeon hides etc.). I've shaken-out 1000's of bales of barley straw when bedding down livestock pens and never had a problem with itching. It's because it's such a good bedding material that livestock farmers use it. If it was full of ticks or flies as someone suggested, or if it created an environment where they could thrive, then farmers, pet shops, horse owners etc. wouldn't entertain it for a moment. I don't use it in the sleeping compartment to be absorbent either, as it's dry in there. I used course softwood sawdust for absorbency - at the toilet end of the cage. Anyway, enough of my rambling on. Each to their own. So long as the little stinkers are dry, clean and comfortable that's all the really matters. I was just sharing what has worked well for my ferrets over 35 years. Anyone want to buy some barley straw?
  12. hideandshoot

    paper or wood shavings

    I've always used straw (on its own) as bedding, and never had a problem. Straw is fairly inert, therefore shouldn't harbour any pests/mites. I use barley straw as it's softer and more comfortable than wheat straw. Don't buy it from a pet shop, get it from an agricultural store or from a livestock feed supplier. A full bale is less than a fiver. Hay is too dusty and does harbour mites. Shredded paper is also quite dusty and it makes your cage look like a rubbish tip. Course sawdust (NOT the fine dusty stuff) is best for the toilet end of the cage as it's very absorbent. Sorry for harping on about bedding etc, I guess I've got a hygene fetish!
  13. hideandshoot

    Labour Issue

    Not really relevant, but one of my ewes had dead triplet lambs this spring. The first one was massive, which the vet managed to eventually pull out backwards, the other two were normal size. Unfortunately all dead. It appears the ewe couldn't part with the larger first lamb and they subsequently all died due to being blocked in for too long. Maybe the same thing happened with your litter. I suppose it could be due to being overfed as the extra size of the first one had to ultimately come from the mothers diet.
  14. hideandshoot

    Working Jill Wanted

    Hi Liam6, Hope I didn't get your hopes up. I spoke with a bloke I know to see if he had any spare jills, but unfortunately he's had three ferrets die over the last 6 months. This has left him rather short of ferrets for himself. Good luck in finding something decent.
  15. hideandshoot

    Kits In A Not

    Sorry to hear your unfortunate news. I've worked in agriculture for a number of years, mainly livestock farming, and it's usually young, inexperienced mothers that lose their offspring or have problems giving birth. I doubt very much if the bedding was a major factor, although giving birth in a pile of dusty wood shavings doesn't sound like much fun. Just as an extra point, hay is also very dusty, so I always use straw. It's clean, relatively dust free, and doesn't attract mites etc. That's why all livestock farmers use it for bedding. It's also cheap if you buy a bale at a time, or free if you know a farmer.
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