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neil cooney

Round Bales ?

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After seeing a video on face book where lads were bolting foxes from round straw bales using Jagd Terriers it dawned on me I haven't done that in years.

Does anyone do it now ?

We never took it seriously and often ended a days digging by having a bit of craic by bolting one or two for a lurcher / gun or just to watch him run into the distance and thank God we never had a problem.

I remember climbing upon to a stack six bales high one time and there was scat on top of it and after that I regularly used them to account for a few.

The last few years round bales are rare but would love to hear of stories about them.

One ol' hunting man I knew used to call them fox hotels.

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I can't walk past them without checking with the lurcher...Good fun.lads I know lost a good terrier last season in a 500 + pile thats been done loads of times,alot of heat and not alot of oxygen in the middle of them,atb dc

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If i see a stack of Bales on my forays its often a reliable spot for the mutts to earn their corn.

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We don't really have them in my area. But read about them in a few books. They do look like a good place for old red to hold up be nice and warm for them

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They are almost a guaranteed place to hold foxes come Winter, personally I'm not a fan of them as I like a dig, but there's no denying they can bump your tally up for the season.

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Not all terriers take to bales,the terrier needs the ability to navigate the bales and work the different levels,most terriers will work ground level and fail to ascend and jump gaps.Then you need a decent sentry to witness the bolt.

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They are almost a guaranteed place to hold foxes come Winter, personally I'm not a fan of them as I like a dig, but there's no denying they can bump your tally up for the season.

Thankfully there are still folk about that know you don,t always have to dig to get a result,ill even give you a little heads up here mucker and state with a little certainty that the majority of fox are accounted for without the assistance of a garden implement,doh.

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You don't need to give me a 'heads up, mucker'.

You're just blowing hot air up bale dog's arses.

I've seen first class bale and rock dogs that are absolutely useless cowards in earths. But I'm yet to see a good earth dog that fails in bale, rocks or drains.

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have been successful working bales in the past, plenty of foxes, feral cats rats etc, once had the sight of madness when another fella was using the bales as a home,

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After seeing a video on face book where lads were bolting foxes from round straw bales using Jagd Terriers it dawned on me I haven't done that in years.

Does anyone do it now ?

We never took it seriously and often ended a days digging by having a bit of craic by bolting one or two for a lurcher / gun or just to watch him run into the distance and thank God we never had a problem.

I remember climbing upon to a stack six bales high one time and there was scat on top of it and after that I regularly used them to account for a few.

The last few years round bales are rare but would love to hear of stories about them.

One ol' hunting man I knew used to call them fox hotels.

We put a fox into a farm shed stacked full of bales with harriers around 10 years ago,ran my terrier bitch who was hard and heard no more for a while.the grey box we had then didn't seem to work in the bales so we listened and one of the lads thought he heard something so we went down from the top,these were small square bales.the bitch had him caught at floor level and when we got down he was dead but she was fuked,which wasn't her normal form.

The heat inside was savage and it was hard for us to draw breath never mind the terrier.the outcome that day was good but it could of easily been bad,the bales inside I think Wer mouldy and there was no air,I would prefer a dig through the ground any day.

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Not many places about me that you could work bales compared to other folk, but we've put them out of roofs of old houses on a regular basis over the years. They hold at certain times depending on weather conditions and temperature. I mind standing with my back to the wall of an old stone cottage, I was in my late teens with my 7/8s grey 1/8th bedlington I had at the time, wondering what I was to expect. Window to the right of me another to the left. Waiting on a fox jump out of the window, usually they don't but it's not uncommon, I wasn't to know. A terrier was put into the roof from the rear, nothing for a while but you could hear the dog searching threw the roof. You where told to be quiet even approaching the building never mind speak, took a few mins then the terrier was on, few barks and you knew there was hunt in it. A fox ran around the gable of the house towards me, a dog was already on its tail. I held up. Just as well. A fox came out off the roof right over the top of my head and landed right in front of me. We killed 4 out off that roof that morning, 2 out of the next roof less than 100 yards away down the same lane. Some crack at the time. You'd be wasting your time trying roofs at certain times off the year, as they only hold under certain conditions.

Is it the same with working bales?

They where good times. It takes a certain type off terrier to run a roof mind you, not all terriers liked being threw up into heights threw windows or floorboards or unstable crevices, not natural surroundings by any means.

Edited by THE GENERAL
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After seeing a video on face book where lads were bolting foxes from round straw bales using Jagd Terriers it dawned on me I haven't done that in years.

Does anyone do it now ?

We never took it seriously and often ended a days digging by having a bit of craic by bolting one or two for a lurcher / gun or just to watch him run into the distance and thank God we never had a problem.

I remember climbing upon to a stack six bales high one time and there was scat on top of it and after that I regularly used them to account for a few.

The last few years round bales are rare but would love to hear of stories about them.

One ol' hunting man I knew used to call them fox hotels.

We put a fox into a farm shed stacked full of bales with harriers around 10 years ago,ran my terrier bitch who was hard and heard no more for a while.the grey box we had then didn't seem to work in the bales so we listened and one of the lads thought he heard something so we went down from the top,these were small square bales.the bitch had him caught at floor level and when we got down he was dead but she was fuked,which wasn't her normal form.

The heat inside was savage and it was hard for us to draw breath never mind the terrier.the outcome that day was good but it could of easily been bad,the bales inside I think Wer mouldy and there was no air,I would prefer a dig through the ground any day.

 

I remember a fox going into a shed of round bales beside a farmhouse one time and all hounds bar 3 couple were stopped on the road. I went into the shed to send them back. As I went in the farmer was coming out of his house. This farmer was hunting friendly but wasn't happy that hounds were in his yard.

I appologised and said I'd take the hounds away. As I entered the shed I seen that hounds had pulled him from the bales and killed him.

I looked out of the shed and could see a car follower coming in to have a nosey and this only annoyed the farmer more.

I asked the car follower could I have his coat and he looked at me funny as he handed me his coat.

I wrapped the coat around the fox, threw it over my shoulder and walked out of the shed with the hounds, said goodbye and thanks to the farmer and walked up to the jeep, threw the fox in the back and handed yer man back his coat who still hadn't a clue.

Until he put it on, LMAO.

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Not many places about me that you could work bales compared to other folk, but we've put them out of roofs of old houses on a regular basis over the years. They hold at certain times depending on weather conditions and temperature. I mind standing with my back to the wall of an old stone cottage, I was in my late teens with my 7/8s grey 1/8th bedlington I had at the time, wondering what I was to expect. Window to the right of me another to the left. Waiting on a fox jump out of the window, usually they don't but it's not uncommon, I wasn't to know. A terrier was put into the roof from the rear, nothing for a while but you could hear the dog searching threw the roof. You where told to be quiet even approaching the building never mind speak, took a few mins then the terrier was on, few barks and you knew there was hunt in it. A fox ran around the gable of the house towards me, a dog was already on its tail. I held up. Just as well. A fox came out off the roof right over the top of my head and landed right in front of me. We killed 4 out off that roof that morning, 2 out of the next roof less than 100 yards away down the same lane. Some crack at the time. You'd be wasting your time trying roofs at certain times off the year, as they only hold under certain conditions.

Is it the same with working bales?

They where good times. It takes a certain type off terrier to run a roof mind you, not all terriers liked being threw up into heights threw windows or floorboards or unstable crevices, not natural surroundings by any means.

There's a hunting man in the North who with his small pack of hounds and lurchers accounts for 3 or 4 hundred foxes each season and if I remember correctly I think he told me a few years back that he had 30 out of roofs one year.

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Not many places about me that you could work bales compared to other folk, but we've put them out of roofs of old houses on a regular basis over the years. They hold at certain times depending on weather conditions and temperature. I mind standing with my back to the wall of an old stone cottage, I was in my late teens with my 7/8s grey 1/8th bedlington I had at the time, wondering what I was to expect. Window to the right of me another to the left. Waiting on a fox jump out of the window, usually they don't but it's not uncommon, I wasn't to know. A terrier was put into the roof from the rear, nothing for a while but you could hear the dog searching threw the roof. You where told to be quiet even approaching the building never mind speak, took a few mins then the terrier was on, few barks and you knew there was hunt in it. A fox ran around the gable of the house towards me, a dog was already on its tail. I held up. Just as well. A fox came out off the roof right over the top of my head and landed right in front of me. We killed 4 out off that roof that morning, 2 out of the next roof less than 100 yards away down the same lane. Some crack at the time. You'd be wasting your time trying roofs at certain times off the year, as they only hold under certain conditions.

Is it the same with working bales?

They where good times. It takes a certain type off terrier to run a roof mind you, not all terriers liked being threw up into heights threw windows or floorboards or unstable crevices, not natural surroundings by any means.

There's a hunting man in the North who with his small pack of hounds and lurchers accounts for 3 or 4 hundred foxes each season and if I remember correctly I think he told me a few years back that he had 30 out of roofs one year.

 

 

assuming he would he have guns with him too Neil?

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