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Alsone

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About Alsone

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    Extreme Hunter

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  1. Alsone

    Modern Body Armour

    Could be but Active Protection Systems are now all the rage. One issue with using polyethylene as tank armour is many rounds detonate in proximity and use a jet of plasma and molten metal to melt their way through the armour rather than use direct energy to blast their way through. Polyethylene is not famed for heat resistance. Ceramics are often used in armour these days eg Chobham armour or active protection plates which seek to neutralise the incoming threat with an outwards explosion of their own.
  2. Alsone

    Modern Body Armour

    I agree but without export restrictions, you can bet your bottom dollar, the Russians have already bought some. What US forces really need to adopt is Tracking Point. However, I imagine price is the issue. Can you imagine forces with this body armour and tracking point rifles, even if it was only squad marksman?
  3. Alsone

    Modern Body Armour

    It said no titanium etc. Just very dense polyethylene. That said, I think the .50 BMG would still kill you. That level of transference of energy would most likely be sufficient to rupture a major artery to the heart or similar. Remember the manikin is hard plastic not soft tissue and it suffered considerable deformation. I've seen this stuff before but never with a .50 cal. With that type of performance and only 4lbs, this has to be a candidate for military use as you could all but make troops impregnable to anything other than a headshot. That said, without export restrictions / classification, all sides are going to have this. Wonder if we're about to see a switch in warfare to armour piercing rounds as standard?
  4. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    I'm presuming there you're referring to the Harold Fish case where the prosecutor claimed that 10mm was too powerful for self defence and it's use therefore amounted to murder. Although Mr, Fish did go to jail due to arguably failings in the US Justice System, the fact the decision was later reversed and he was released, hopefully that case should ensure that the whole argument of having too powerful a gun for self defence doesn't arise again. That said, in the context of the rest of this thread, here in the UK handguns are banned for self defence and have only limited availability for humane dispatch (usually of deer) by sportsman, and all larger animals by vets. Even then although there's no calibre restriction, many police forces tend to only licence either .22 or .38 (usually the former), and often only in a single shot format.
  5. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    If you want .223 performance in a handgun, you want a .500 S&W (I mean literally .223 performance!). However, the gun is ridiculously large and heavy (although they do now make a 3" and 5" version"). Probably OK for hunting if you have strong wrists. I'm not sure I'd describe .357 magnum as lacking oomph, it's the most powerful mainstream handgun calibre behind .44 Magnum (of course there are several calibres above). However out of the common calibres of .38, 40S&W, 9mm, 10mm, .357 magnum has the most destructive power. It's held back as a self defence calibre by the lack of revolver magazine capacity (less of an issue for handgun hunting non dangerous game, obviously). Maybe some of the perceived lack of firepower comes down to the relatively smaller recoil from .357 because .44 magnum, apart from being a bit more powerful (50% more energy although note it's only 750 vs 550 ft lbs approximately), also has twice the case capacity (37 gr vs 26gr), and so has much heavier recoil. just for fun, .500S&W: There's a picture of the bullets on this page: http://www.christiangunowner.com/smithandwesson500magnum.html On the left, .44 Magnum, in the centre.....
  6. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    Because self defence is their primary usage, at least in countries like the states. For dispatch, I doubt the calibre is that critical as any handgun at point blank is going to be capable of killing. I'm pretty sure vets dispatch injured horses and cattle with a .22 pistol.
  7. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    10mm. In my opinion, best balance between stopping power and useability. .357 Mag more powerful but almost exclusively, with a couple of exceptions, a revolver round which limits you to 5 shots. What might surprise a lot of people is unlike the movies, even the FBI MISS in a gun fight with 82% of their shots (18% hit rate). So having just 5 can be an issue. 9mm, Law Enforcement choice but lacking a little in stopping power. Law Enforcement recently switched to 10mm for more stopping power, then switched back. I read they only changed back to 9mm from 10mm, after accuracy dropped on the range tests and some women found 10mm a little too much gun. Many say 10mm wasn't the issue but a lack of practice and familiarity with the new firearm. I really couldn't comment, beyond saying from what I've seen, it appears to be a really good accurate gun with a significant step up in destructive effect from 9mm for only marginally more recoil. 40 S&W use to be Law Enforcement choice before 9mm, but it's weaker when it comes to stopping power. 500 S&W too powerful Issues with pass through (ie killing the innocent person behind!) and recoil makes it very difficult to get off a subsequent shots. Also the guns are huge and weigh, lots, making them impossible to conceal, draw, fire quick follow ups. Has the power of a .223 in a handgun! They do make a handgun in .22 Hornet (Taurus Raging Hornet), but .22 Hornet not that impressive in the short barrel.
  8. Alsone

    Advice required about Shotguns

    Good advice although for me I find little difference between Winchester and Browning. Winchester guns are designed by Browning in any event. Probably something no-one has touched upon up to now is balance. One very good reason for trying a few different guns under an instructor or even at a clay shoot that allows guests is the fact that most people fall into 1 of 2 main camps - Beretta and Browning. Many of the mainstream guns are made from designs from these 2 factories and if you do go for something a little more exotic, whether cheap or expensive, you will at least have some idea of what you like. Winchester being made from Browning are very similar to Browning and Miroku guns in balance (also Browning design). So if you like Winchester, you'll also like Browning and Miroku. Personally I'd have no hesitation in buying a Winchester shotgun if you like shooting the one you've tried. Just make sure you also get some advice on wear to ensure you're not buying a clapped out gun or one out of proof.
  9. Alsone

    Advice required about Shotguns

    I agree go to a clay ground and get assessed by an instructor. Personally, I think you might find shooting left handed hard. Shotguns are about a smooth swing and that could be difficult to achieve with your weak hand steadying the gun and controlling the butt and your strong hand making the swing. I've never come across this, but I'm sure instructors have. Personally, my instinct is to think you'll probably learn to shoot perfectly well with the "wrong" eye dominant as I would have thought the only difference it's going to make is the amount of lead (leed (deliberate mis-spelling) not lead as in shot!) you give the target. At the end of the day, both eyes are looking down the barrel, the only difference between the two is which side of the barrel they look down. Personally I never see the barrel / sight when shooting shotgun. I just see the target and the shot go where I'm looking so the rest is judgement - I know where I'm looking is where the barrels are.
  10. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    I never remember extolling .17 Hornet as a long range fox tool. A couple of hundred it's ok to from memory. As an alternative to the .22 Hornet though, it's an excellent calibre that's flat shooting and with a potentially more reach for smaller game. It's also easier to get good off the shelf ammo as there's no legacy loads out there for older proofed guns. Would I prefer .17 Hornet to .22 Hornet, yes, but that's my preference. I'd rather have a flat shoot and more reach in energy and velocity, much as some people prefer .22-250 over .223. As for .223, I'm not knocking it. Just saying there are more destructive and interesting calibres in the .223 bullet size range than .223 itself. There are reasons why people buy .223, and reason why people choose alternatives. If .223 was the prefect calibre, then non of the others would exist and vice versa. Each has it's advantages and disadvantages.
  11. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    Dead is dead. However there are times most notably at range when some people prefer a little extra margin of power to make up for those occasions when it's a less than perfect shot. Also, it's about preference, .223 is like the Ford Mondeo of rounds. It's does everything average Joe requires. Not everybody drives Mondeo's though and that's because some like sportier cars, or need cars for specialised purposes or simply want something different for show. Some simply find more power entertaining. Nothing wrong in that. The prey doesn't care and if it reduces the chance of a wound then to that extent it's can be better. Of the more specialised rounds, the ones listed above are the more popular ones. The equation though is always one of velocity vs bullet weight vs personal preference vs cost, availability, prey fate (ie after death use), etc.
  12. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    I don't disagree, I think the majority choose .223 because it's simply the go to round - easy to obtain, has adequate performance for most situations and yes, some people do like military calibres and style weapons especially on ranges. As for vaporised quarry, it does happen with other rounds, but not almost every shot as with the more specialised high velocity calibres. I guess ultimately it all comes down to what floats your boat. However as I've said before, there's a lot to be said for having a little extra killing power and some simply find vaporising vermin more entertaining. There's nothing wrong with a .243. As you say, very versatile round if a little expensive for some uses.
  13. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    When compared to the .223, no. But that's because the .223 has military associations (which attracts the associate with the army macho crowd), and it simply fits for most people. For those looking for a more specialized round, the above have proven popular choices. If you were to take a sample of the more specialized rounds, ie. 222, 222 magnum, 223 WSSM, hornet, etc (without listing all the obscure more or less gone to the wall rounds), the .22-250, is probably the most popular, with .220 swift being more popular in the older days and .204 gaining a more recent foothold.
  14. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    Yep, higher velocity = higher explosive but less penetration. Lower velocity = higher penetration but less explosive. However, with the 1st one, increasing bullet weight increase penetration so it's possible to compensate for the lower penetration by using a heavier bullet, albeit a heavy bullet is hard to drive fast. It also explains why .204 can be prone to splash at 32gr but not the heavier weights and the evolution of .22-250 into quite a popular round. This isn't a test in the field, but it does yield some interesting "lab" results that supports the above: I think you need to ask yourself where the best balance lies and how much penetration and explosiveness you actually need. There is something uniquely satisfying though to vaporising your prey if it's not required for eating which probably explains the popularity of .204 and .22-250, and in the older days, .220 swift. In fact Ackley used to reckon you could take down any game in North America with a swift. Not sure I'd want to test that against an aggressive grizzly though.
  15. Alsone

    .223 does the damage

    I agree, 32gr .204 are prone to splash. So far as Ackley goes, c'mon Deker, you know where the google button is: https://www.tactical-life.com/firearms/long-gun-legends-p-o-ackley/ Must admit, the entirely non serious eargesplitten loudenboomer cartridge he developed really has me hooked. Imagine turning up at you local gun club and loading one of these: (3rd pic down the best) : https://imgur.com/gallery/DdeSr
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