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Fac Air Rifles.......????


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#31 John Stott

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 07:52 pm

The problem up here is that they may not evade "officialdom" for much longer.

 

If you had to put all your air rifles on a "ticket" you would just make them all FAC anyway, wouldn`t you ?

We will have to wait and see what the marxist nannies vote for friend! Our local licensing officer reckoned that if they went on ticket throughout the UK departments would grind to a halt in days. The workload will be impossible to manage and a compromise would be found, as it always is. And yes, if it happens in Scotland you might as well just apply for a full FAC.   I saw one suggestion for Scotland being self registration, much like the current FAC one for many shooters. How many bets on that route and a nice fat fee as well?



#32 Rake aboot

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 07:53 pm

Pigeons in long barns.

 

Caravan sites as well

There are loads of areas where FAC air suits best.


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#33 Born Hunter

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:20 pm

FAC air rifles certainly have their place, not least because the pellet will land harmlessly if fired upwards, whereas a .22 bullet has killed at least one person on landing after a shot up into trees, unbeknown to the shooter until later.

 

Really? I've heard that said plenty and imo it's complete bollocks. A 40gr lead slug falling at it's terminal velocity... I find it hard to believe it would leave much more than a bloody bruise at most.



#34 tilimangro

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:30 pm

So what kind of situations would a FAC airifle be preferable over a normal sub 12, but where a 22lr wouldn't be suitable?

i have access to land that has a golf course and public footpaths on three sides

ive been told i wont get anything above fac airrifle permission on it


Edited by tilimangro, 28 June 2014 - 08:31 pm.

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#35 Rake aboot

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:35 pm

Urban legend, I even know an old bloke round my way that killed someone a mile away !  rubbish



#36 RemyBolt

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:56 pm

 

FAC air rifles certainly have their place, not least because the pellet will land harmlessly if fired upwards, whereas a .22 bullet has killed at least one person on landing after a shot up into trees, unbeknown to the shooter until later.

 

Really? I've heard that said plenty and imo it's complete bollocks. A 40gr lead slug falling at it's terminal velocity... I find it hard to believe it would leave much more than a bloody bruise at most.

 

US presidents have been shot with .22lr's (relatively longer ranges than 100 meters, so not sure about terminal velocity under gravity) as assassination attempts and have barely realised, so I do question this also.


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#37 danw

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 09:04 pm

http://www.gazettean...St_Bernard_dad/


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#38 Lid

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 06:39 am

 

FAC air rifles certainly have their place, not least because the pellet will land harmlessly if fired upwards, whereas a .22 bullet has killed at least one person on landing after a shot up into trees, unbeknown to the shooter until later.

 

Really? I've heard that said plenty and imo it's complete bollocks. A 40gr lead slug falling at it's terminal velocity... I find it hard to believe it would leave much more than a bloody bruise at most.

 

 

 

This is documented in a shooting book written in the 40's or 50's (or even the 60's). I think the author was called Churchill or Christie.  I am busy for the next few weeks, but I will try to find it after that and then corroborate or disprove it with other evidence. I apologise in advance if this is an incorrect fact, or if I have misremebered the calibre.


Edited by Lid, 29 June 2014 - 06:49 am.


#39 thursodog

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 06:49 am

When i first applied for it years ago it was I admit all about MORE POWER!!.
Its now became a fascinating challenge to have my HW80 shooting as smooth and consistent as I can possibly make it.
The guns currently stripped and locked away with me working on each component to make it as good as I can get.
Tha major work is on a V-glide style piston along with a v-mach service kit and a half inch unf thread on the end to take a heavy Parker hale mod to add more weight.
It will end off weighing the same as a 97k.
I had it running really good with piston buttons tuned trigger etc but want it even better.
The upside of this fac springer is a nice flat trajectory on a really hard hitting .22 rifle that shoots very accurately when i put the practise in.
There is far less work involved range finding and working out trajectory like we do with the sub 12 .22.
Its like shooting an accurate .177.
Anything out to 40 yards I just point and shoot.
Brilliant bit of kit that I can't wait to get back together with the latest improvements.

Chris.

#40 Cedric

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 09:36 am

My uncle started FAC with a short, FAC pneumatic .22 air rifle that took, I think, about 9 manual pumps on the lever thingy per shot. It was really great though and certainly taught you to be a good stalker and accurate with one shot at a time and a huge gap in between shots.

 

FAC air rifles certainly have their place, not least because the pellet will land harmlessly if fired upwards, whereas a .22 bullet has killed at least one person on landing after a shot up into trees, unbeknown to the shooter until later.

A rough calculation gives a .22 pellet as having about 1.5 ftlbs energy at terminal velocity and a 40gr. .22 bullet as 4.5 ftlbs.



#41 Born Hunter

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 10:04 am

 

 

FAC air rifles certainly have their place, not least because the pellet will land harmlessly if fired upwards, whereas a .22 bullet has killed at least one person on landing after a shot up into trees, unbeknown to the shooter until later.

 

Really? I've heard that said plenty and imo it's complete bollocks. A 40gr lead slug falling at it's terminal velocity... I find it hard to believe it would leave much more than a bloody bruise at most.

 

 

 

This is documented in a shooting book written in the 40's or 50's (or even the 60's). I think the author was called Churchill or Christie.  I am busy for the next few weeks, but I will try to find it after that and then corroborate or disprove it with other evidence. I apologise in advance if this is an incorrect fact, or if I have misremebered the calibre.

 

 

I doubt you've missremembered mate. Just don't believe it. It's bollocks, as proven by Dan's link, hit on the shoulder and didn't even break the skin....



#42 Lid

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 10:21 am

Yes I was surprised when I came across this case and we often shot crows, roosting pigeons, etc with .22 lr in trees! Now that I have thought about it, the author may not have been Churchill (and Christie is a mistake). At the time, around 1976, I had taken out two books on shooting from the Oxford City library - one was a Churchill book, but I don't remember what the other was and it may have been in this second book. 

 

I am still sure the incident described involved a .22 lr -  a young lad of about 11 was watching a football match sitting on a fence or a gate in village and he suddenly fell off dead. On examination he had a bullet wound in his neck. The author, I think, was called to investigate and determined the shot had come from the rifle (.22 rimfire I think) belonging some-one who had been shooting rooks in a wood about a mile away at the time! When I have more time I will try to find the book, but it may be hard. Of course I may have got this a bit mixed up after 38 years, but it is crystal clear in my memory, apart from what book.



#43 RemyBolt

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:49 pm

But, with an FAC air rifle, shooting a similar size pellet, would that not cause the same damage?

 

I'm thinking terminal velocity, air resistance, gravitational accelleration being the same on all objects, and things like that, wouldn't the same size pellet from an air rifle do the same damage? Unless the 22lr was able to hold more of it's speed than the FAC AR.



#44 moxy

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 04:06 pm

I think there's far too much thinking going on :laugh:

#45 RemyBolt

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 06:24 pm

I think there's far too much thinking going on :laugh:

The inquisitive mind requires knowledge.

 

You know me Moxy, I am desperate to learn all I can....like counting to 3 (almost there! Just 4 more numbers to go!) 


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