Jump to content
Henryrussel5591

Artifical earth's - how to make them better

Recommended Posts


Same as what you would want bud, dry, no wind blowing up tubes, no disturbances,  water no too far away and a local food source will give you the best chance of achieving, couple pipes coming off a chamber and you cant go wrong, works for me, hope this helps👍🏻

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Get off ur arse and look for some natural earths you'll have more of a chance you lazy c**t 👍

  • Haha 6

Share this post


Link to post
24 minutes ago, Apache... said:

Get off ur arse and look for some natural earths you'll have more of a chance you lazy c**t 👍

🤣

Share this post


Link to post

I think it’s just by chance if your lucky that the fox favourites a place. Used to try plenty but there was always one where foxes in the area would favour it over any natural earths, once bolted 3 out of a little 2 holes that was in the shape of a T. The entrances doubled over in a u shape to stop draughts blowing in. And it was only a few inch deep with flags to cover it. Handy isn’t the word 😃

Share this post


Link to post

Like rob said I think its more down to luck.I know a couple of straight pipes running between ditches on a golf coarse that regularly hold foxes also known a couple of short pipes under gateways where they'd quite often lay.Ive also known lads spend days digging intricate artificials with multiple entrances and sleeping areas that have never held a thing.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

Try and put it in an area where there isn’t many other natural earths always improves the chances of them being used and as said dry out of the wind and left quiet are a must

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Got loads on estate near me, they go in cycles.....never hold for years then bang, bolt several over a season then the next year another is favoured. Quick and easy and can cover alot more ground quicker and easier than waiting for a dog to search tight soil spots. The keepers have been putting them in there for years

Share this post


Link to post

I used to find regularly in just straight pipes in a hedge. It was on land that had no other cover . If there is nowhere else for them they will use them . Also leave a dead sheep or deer near it in winter . ATB

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I used to find regularly in just straight pipes in a hedge. It was on land that had no other cover . If there is nowhere else for them they will use them . Also leave a dead sheep or deer near it in winter . ATB

Share this post


Link to post

The hunt near me build what they call wigwams ,branches and boughs all layerd up against a tree in a wood ,the base being 20 ft across ,These hold .

They also use sleepers on edge dug in or not and covered in branches and turf these also hold .

There is no rhyme nor reason to why some perfectly placed dry arts never hold no matter the encouragement and a wet drain further on has one in .

A variety is the thing I’d say and don’t try it too often .

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I found in areas with a lot of gorse or thick blackthorns that they are happy to lie up on top of ground even if earths are nearby. A good wet day will change that immediately and natural earths just seem to hold better if there is a few about. I put in an artificial earth on a high bank just 300 yards from a natural earth and positioned it similar. I've never found in the artificial and even bolted foxes over it but got several digs in the natural. I suppose they just take to it or they won't. Drop in a couple and they will probably use one of them but garauntee it will likely be the same one consistently  and they'll just ignore the others. Nature has funny ways of working.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×