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farmerkev09

greyhound ferrets

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I DO LOVE A KNOW IT ALL AND THEN KNOW'S F*CK ALL AND ALL THE ADVIVE GIVEN IS ONLY WHAT OTHER PEOPLE HAVE TOLD THEM OR OUT OF A BOOK I HAVE KEPT FERRETS FOR 35YEARS AND I NEVER READ SO MUCK SHIT ABOUT BREEDING AND KEEPING FERRETS ATB TJ

 

And I love someone stuck in the past.

 

Things change, knowledge improves.

 

Or do you still feed milk and slops and snap teeth?

Good answer droid,

 

Well there has been a few posts about folk like tj claiming to have owned greyhound ferret bas no one has yet managed to put up a picture or give any real hard proof they did/do excistso if any person can prove it then please share it with the world because as i see it, it is only a myth and old codjers like tj thinking back to there youth and since that was alsong time ago his memory might be playing tricks. :feck:

 

i,m not that old and like i said you know F*CK ALL :feck:

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I DO LOVE A KNOW IT ALL AND THEN KNOW'S F*CK ALL AND ALL THE ADVIVE GIVEN IS ONLY WHAT OTHER PEOPLE HAVE TOLD THEM OR OUT OF A BOOK I HAVE KEPT FERRETS FOR 35YEARS AND I NEVER READ SO MUCK SHIT ABOUT BREEDING AND KEEPING FERRETS ATB TJ

 

And I love someone stuck in the past.

 

Things change, knowledge improves.

 

Or do you still feed milk and slops and snap teeth?

Good answer droid,

 

Well there has been a few posts about folk like tj claiming to have owned greyhound ferret bas no one has yet managed to put up a picture or give any real hard proof they did/do excistso if any person can prove it then please share it with the world because as i see it, it is only a myth and old codjers like tj thinking back to there youth and since that was alsong time ago his memory might be playing tricks. :feck:

You know that search button at the top of our section if you type what your after in there strangely enuf magicly what you are bangin o. About will apear saves askin loads of questions about topics that folk hav already put pictures up about

 

i,m not that old and like i said you know F*CK ALL :feck:

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I DO LOVE A KNOW IT ALL AND THEN KNOW'S F*CK ALL AND ALL THE ADVIVE GIVEN IS ONLY WHAT OTHER PEOPLE HAVE TOLD THEM OR OUT OF A BOOK I HAVE KEPT FERRETS FOR 35YEARS AND I NEVER READ SO MUCK SHIT ABOUT BREEDING AND KEEPING FERRETS ATB TJ

 

And I love someone stuck in the past.

 

Things change, knowledge improves.

 

Or do you still feed milk and slops and snap teeth?

Good answer droid,

 

Well there has been a few posts about folk like tj claiming to have owned greyhound ferret bas no one has yet managed to put up a picture or give any real hard proof they did/do excistso if any person can prove it then please share it with the world because as i see it, it is only a myth and old codjers like tj thinking back to there youth and since that was alsong time ago his memory might be playing tricks. :feck:

 

Nothing wrong with my memory mate, believe me or not,I owned and bred them.I'm sure there are plenty of folk left that remember Abbot bros, they advertised weekly in the Exchange and Mart, their standard ferrets where £3 and greyhounds and "small specials" were £10 each. A mate of mine had a "small special" and it was the smallest ferret I've ever seen. I had some greyhounds which were bigger and as I described earlier, they were not starved, they were well fed on flesh. All you've achieved by calling the likes of me, an old codger and insinuating I'm a liar, is show your own ignorance and lack of knowledge. I actually now feel superior as I know something to be a fact that you the "expert" doesn't. Ffs every breed of dog was selectively bred from wolves, but you can't accept that folk could selectively breed a strain of ferrets a bit more lithe than the norm. Or could it just be your pissed off because someone knows more than you. Oh and as for pics, 30 odd yrs ago, we didn't know that the time would come, when everyone would take pictures of everything, as proof because everyone was so dishonest, that nobody believed a word anyone else said!

Edited by romany52

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iv got 3 greyhound ferrets 2 jills 1 hob and kits the hob is the size of the average size of a jill and the jills are the size of a stoat and thay will work all day witch sume people say thay that thay are not capple of and beleve me thay are went to scotland 4 the larst 2 years and worked every day and didnt have 2 dig 1s i will get sum pics up as soon as i can

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

Edited by maltenby

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Nothing wrong with my memory mate, believe me or not,I owned and bred them.I'm sure there are plenty of folk left that remember Abbot bros, they advertised weekly in the Exchange and Mart, their standard ferrets where £3 and greyhounds and "small specials" were £10 each. A mate of mine had a "small special" and it was the smallest ferret I've ever seen. I had some greyhounds which were bigger and as I described earlier, they were not starved, they were well fed on flesh. All you've achieved by calling the likes of me, an old codger and insinuating I'm a liar, is show your own ignorance and lack of knowledge. I actually now feel superior as I know something to be a fact that you the "expert" doesn't. Ffs every breed of dog was selectively bred from wolves, but you can't accept that folk could selectively breed a strain of ferrets a bit more lithe than the norm. Or could it just be your pissed off because someone knows more than you. Oh and as for pics, 30 odd yrs ago, we didn't know that the time would come, when everyone would take pictures of everything, as proof because everyone was so dishonest, that nobody believed a word anyone else said!

I well remember getting my first ferrets from Abbott Bros :thumbs: delivered to the railway station you got a trio(1 hob+2jills) for £5 inc.they were unbelievably tame and cant recall ever been bitten by any ferrets from them,as for type well there was only one type of ferret back then(late 50's) and they were workers plain and simple

Y.I.S Leeview

an even older codger than romany52 :clapper:

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

Plausabile mate could be very well be.never really been into the genetic make up myself.My jills are pretty tiny and that suits me,but i have heard of the greyhound types im sure magwitch has them but might be wrong.he has some cracking wee ones i know that.He posted pics of them.oh and have you seen some of those vids on jewtube?those mad yanks have there ferts collecting slippers and begging and rolling over like a f*****g dog :laugh: or maybe its easier to integrate with the yanks :laugh: (couldnt resist that lol)

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Hope magwitch doesn't mind me re-posting his photo. But here is a micro ferret but don't think they are the same as greyhound fezzers. but they are definately smaller than ya normal ferrets.

 

 

DSC_1262.jpg

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

Plausabile mate could be very well be.never really been into the genetic make up myself.My jills are pretty tiny and that suits me,but i have heard of the greyhound types im sure magwitch has them but might be wrong.he has some cracking wee ones i know that.He posted pics of them.oh and have you seen some of those vids on jewtube?those mad yanks have there ferts collecting slippers and begging and rolling over like a f*****g dog :laugh: or maybe its easier to integrate with the yanks :laugh: (couldnt resist that lol)

 

:clapper: :clapper:

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

There is most likely an element of that mate. A silver fox program in Russia set out to breed calmer ,more easily handleable foxes that would also breed better, being more placid. That's when the pendent ears and collie marking came in. I don't know how it works exactly , but scientists found that the hormone , or whatever it was that causes the fear and nervousness in wild animals diminishes when you selectively breed for calmness. Now apparently this is also used in the assimilation of colour and other genes as well. I believe they also bred short legged foxes. That program was abandoned because partie coloured fur was worthless.

Now getting back to my greyhound ferrets they had a strong tendency to be biters. I had to hand rear a litter once and they were the worst biters I've ever had. So the point you make is a valid one, could be that so many ferrets are bred as docile pets they have changed physically, it could also account for all the new colours and long coats that didn't exist not too many years ago.

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

There is most likely an element of that mate. A silver fox program in Russia set out to breed calmer ,more easily handleable foxes that would also breed better, being more placid. That's when the pendent ears and collie marking came in. I don't know how it works exactly , but scientists found that the hormone , or whatever it was that causes the fear and nervousness in wild animals diminishes when you selectively breed for calmness. Now apparently this is also used in the assimilation of colour and other genes as well. I believe they also bred short legged foxes. That program was abandoned because partie coloured fur was worthless.

Now getting back to my greyhound ferrets they had a strong tendency to be biters. I had to hand rear a litter once and they were the worst biters I've ever had. So the point you make is a valid one, could be that so many ferrets are bred as docile pets they have changed physically, it could also account for all the new colours and long coats that didn't exist not too many years ago.

 

Yeah, wasn't it to do with something called 'flight radius,' the measured distance you can get to a wild animal without it running away? The ones with the least fear had the lowest levels of the hormone, and so were the ones most easily domesticated. :hmm:

 

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

There is most likely an element of that mate. A silver fox program in Russia set out to breed calmer ,more easily handleable foxes that would also breed better, being more placid. That's when the pendent ears and collie marking came in. I don't know how it works exactly , but scientists found that the hormone , or whatever it was that causes the fear and nervousness in wild animals diminishes when you selectively breed for calmness. Now apparently this is also used in the assimilation of colour and other genes as well. I believe they also bred short legged foxes. That program was abandoned because partie coloured fur was worthless.

Now getting back to my greyhound ferrets they had a strong tendency to be biters. I had to hand rear a litter once and they were the worst biters I've ever had. So the point you make is a valid one, could be that so many ferrets are bred as docile pets they have changed physically, it could also account for all the new colours and long coats that didn't exist not too many years ago.

 

Yeah, wasn't it to do with something called 'flight radius,' the measured distance you can get to a wild animal without it running away? The ones with the least fear had the lowest levels of the hormone, and so were the ones most easily domesticated. :hmm:

 

Yeh that's it mate, the flight or fight radius, outside it they run, inside they attack . Think it's also why most domestic animals come in colours not found in their wild relatives.

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Going out on a bit of a limb, but here goes... :clapper:

 

Years ago ferrets were purely used for hunting, only taken out of their small hutches when they were being cleaned out and worked. It's been proven with dogs and the 'silver fox' program taking place in Russia, that over time generations of domestic animal become more appealing to humans with more intimate contact. Like the dog breeds & without selective breeding, the foxes started to take on characteristics like retaining their puppy like ears, displaying different coloured coats, different tails etc.

 

People of today tend to spend more time with their ferrets, give them better housing & food. Is it possible that this alone has somehow altered the form of the ferret slightly with each generation? If you think about it, the stoat like form of the 'greyhound' ferret has given way to a form not too unlike a younger, semi kit like form...

 

I'm in no way suggesting that the ferret has the ability/mentality to integrate with humans as the dog has, just offering food for thought... :thumbs:

 

There is most likely an element of that mate. A silver fox program in Russia set out to breed calmer ,more easily handleable foxes that would also breed better, being more placid. That's when the pendent ears and collie marking came in. I don't know how it works exactly , but scientists found that the hormone , or whatever it was that causes the fear and nervousness in wild animals diminishes when you selectively breed for calmness. Now apparently this is also used in the assimilation of colour and other genes as well. I believe they also bred short legged foxes. That program was abandoned because partie coloured fur was worthless.

Now getting back to my greyhound ferrets they had a strong tendency to be biters. I had to hand rear a litter once and they were the worst biters I've ever had. So the point you make is a valid one, could be that so many ferrets are bred as docile pets they have changed physically, it could also account for all the new colours and long coats that didn't exist not too many years ago.

 

The silver fox programm is still being run on a scientific basis and is well into the 100 generations. their research has identified three type of behaviour towards humans from foxes

 

- fear (the fox will not approach humans)

- aggression (the fox will try to attack humans)

- curiosity (the fox will approach humans and actively seek them out for affection)

 

Each behavioural trait has been bred together to explore them and what was found was as you said the curious foxes changed coat colours, behaviour, physical shape and vocal sounds. Whereas the other two types did not alter is these areas at all.

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Hope magwitch doesn't mind me re-posting his photo. But here is a micro ferret but don't think they are the same as greyhound fezzers. but they are definately smaller than ya normal ferrets.

 

 

DSC_1262.jpg

Id call that more of a greyhound ferret than a ''micro'' they are about six'' long.

Looks like a nice ferret all the same.

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