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Ned Makim

Boars in Oz

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The Butters blood is effectively gone. We've been working within the existing family but I have three other people who breed based on my breeding but do their own thing with crosses. I trust them absolutely when it comes to judgement of a working dog and we get together once a year to look at what's been going on. (One bloke lives 15 hours from me so that's why it's only once a year.) They try other dogs or variations on mine and occassionally breed so our get together involves a few beers, a few barbecues and a few pig hunts to test things out. I have one of my mates dogs here now, Geoff. He's by a dog produced from an Ian Colley dog over one of my bitches (Gina...Russell x Kelly). That dog went back over Kelly to produce Geoff.

 

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He's a big, rough dog of about 12 months. Can find them, will tackle a rough pig without hesitation and let go on command. But he is bloody ignorant, not as easy to fine tune as mine but well worth the experiment.

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so glad your back ned!!! ill pm you when ive been paid and sort out a book mate. love the look of geoff lol im sure he'll do you proud :victory:

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Just finished the tread start to end over a few days that is ha. Really enjoyed it keep it coming and safe hunting ned.

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Thanks for your response on the hairy dogs Ned...How did those black mouth curs dogs do that were imported the US??

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The black mouth curs seems to be going well. I haven't seen them hunt but the reports are good so far. The general hunting populace is a bit baulked by the cost but they appear to be finding and stopping pigs and working rough cattle well.

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A very interesting read Ned, and praise for having put this together. Whilst your method is not necessarily applicable to many lurchers and the very varied jobs we want them to do, and may even seem at odds to some of the training methods used by lurcher owners, the whole book speaks of long experience in the world of the pig dog, and dogs in general, and most importantly, your ability to read a dog and develop its potential to the best.

I've read it once, and shall read it again, for it is full of useful insights into how a dog's mind works, how it develops and what we should strive for when approaching dog training: patience, consistency, repetition, and more patience. Big thumbs up from me :thumbs::thumbs::thumbs:

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A quick tale of two pigs...

I went out laying poison baits for foxes today on contract for a couple of landholders whose lambs are due. All up it's about 9000 acres so I need to kill a lot of foxes to make an impact. I prefer to trap but trapping just doesn't cut it on that scale. Anyway, the boars in this area often move into near the lambing paddocks to position themselves for the easy pickings living or dead lambs offer. I'd been talking to one of the landholders about pigs in general and what different sign indicated. When I met him at the house yesterday he said he'd seen some sign down near the creek beside his main lambing paddock. "Based on what you said, I think it will be a boar on his own."
I got most of the baits laid and went for a look myself.
There was plenty of sign but the breeze was going the wrong way. I passed the area and swung around into the breeze to give the dogs a better chance and almost instantly Dave and Mary went. It was only a couple of seconds and they were in the thick bottlebrush on a rough little boar. He was nothing special but tough and with the little bit of dancing around He was on the deck.

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While I was feeling happy with myself I got a text message on the phone from a mate of minewho has a couple of young dogs from my yard.
He'd been out the night before and caught a few before his kelpie (a sheepdog) bailed up a big fella. Adam was on his own with a big pig the kelpie was stretched controlling when his 12 month old Jack (out of my Suzie) came screaming out of the dark and smacked onto the pig. Adam told me it was a struggle for the young dog but he held firm and the knife was pushed home.

It was a barra (castrated boar) and weighed on the electronic scales came in at 127.2kg liveweight (279lbs). A good boar for the young dog to hold. (The pig bottomed out the farmers scales (pictured) and was transferred onto the electronic scale to get an accurate reading.)

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This is Jack (brown dog) and Jess (grey) with the kelpie.

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So two pigs, one small, one big and a long way apart but I like to think I had a hand in both of them. That's what I tell myself anyway...

Edited by Ned Makim
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Mate I love this thread lol ;)

So do I: what we get is a mixture of real hunting, a man with a ton of dog sense ... and humility: a very rare combination methinks. Not to mention the dogs of course!

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Could have been caught, cut and styed for the table before an escape. In past times some landholders would cut a boar and let it free range to be caught or shot later for the table. A barrow (or barra as it's colloquially known) gets big but untainted by the boar smell so makes good pork without adding to the breeding population. It's illegal to let any of them go so impossible to say what's happened here. They can be nightmares to catch too. Big, cunning and nasty.

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