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Attack Fell Terrier

Electrolyte drinks

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

Mars bar contains easily used suger and I used to use them years ago, just used to bite the chocolate off for myself then and give the dogs a piece of the inner every now and then when working hard, one reason I don't normally recommend a brand.As to electrolytes and lucozade the difference is lucozade is glucose drink and electrolytes are salts so they are used for different things, when a child or pup is vomiting or having diarrhea then the fluid its is losing will contain salts so the Dioralyte will replace them, when a dog collapses it is likely depleted its energy reserve and so isn't short of electrolyte but will be short of glucose., or over heated, so it needs the energy reserve, glucose, replacingSo if its not lost electrolytes don't replace them as this may upset the already stressed system. If it is collapsed it may have an element of rhabdomyolysis and with this you get a massive release of the electrolytes from the muscles into the blood which is dangerous to say the least so adding more random electrolytes into the system at this point is, plainly put, bloody stupid.

Edited by sandymere
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Guest Moscow

Sandymere you answer posts like a politician you avoid questions and never give a straight answer, your posts are long winded and usually a mile away from laymans terms I dont think anyone quite understands them? I dont even read them anymore TBH, Everything you post seems like its quoted from a book or literature written on the subject your posting about!

Edited by Moscow

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

Mars bar contains easily used suger and I used to use them years ago, just used to bite the chocolate off for myself then and give the dogs a piece of the inner every now and then when working hard, one reason I don't normally recommend a brand.As to electrolytes and lucozade the difference is lucozade is glucose drink and electrolytes are salts so they are used for different things, when a child or pup is vomiting or having diarrhea then the fluid its is losing will contain salts so the Dioralyte will replace them, when a dog collapses it is likely depleted its energy reserve and so isn't short of electrolyte but will be short of glucose., or over heated, so it needs the energy reserve, glucose, replacingSo if its not lost electrolytes don't replace them as this may upset the already stressed system. If it is collapsed it may have an element of rhabdomyolysis and with this you get a massive release of the electrolytes from the muscles into the blood which is dangerous to say the least so adding more random electrolytes into the system at this point is, plainly put, bloody stupid.

in total aggrement on that one, once rhabdomyolysis has started then theres very little if anything that can be done to stop it.

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

Mars bar contains easily used suger and I used to use them years ago, just used to bite the chocolate off for myself then and give the dogs a piece of the inner every now and then when working hard, one reason I don't normally recommend a brand.As to electrolytes and lucozade the difference is lucozade is glucose drink and electrolytes are salts so they are used for different things, when a child or pup is vomiting or having diarrhea then the fluid its is losing will contain salts so the Dioralyte will replace them, when a dog collapses it is likely depleted its energy reserve and so isn't short of electrolyte but will be short of glucose., or over heated, so it needs the energy reserve, glucose, replacingSo if its not lost electrolytes don't replace them as this may upset the already stressed system. If it is collapsed it may have an element of rhabdomyolysis and with this you get a massive release of the electrolytes from the muscles into the blood which is dangerous to say the least so adding more random electrolytes into the system at this point is, plainly put, bloody stupid.

Ok mate thanks for the answer.

So to try and summarise what your actually saying, in the event of a dog collapsing from exhaustion on a nights lamping dont give electrolytes type stuff to them? What you recommend in their stead then? I am assuming a mars bar is not the ideal solution

Edited by lapin2008

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I've used http://www.greyhound...charge-678.html in the past like millet just posted and a few lads into coursing used it regular.

They recommend it for mild dehydration ie the sort that will recover fine with just a drink of water. They certainly don't suggest its use in any dogs that is suffering the effects of hard running, email them if unsure. Basically drinking salt water will make you piss more after you have drunk more to excrete all that unwanted salt.

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I've used http://www.greyhound...charge-678.html in the past like millet just posted and a few lads into coursing used it regular.

They recommend it for mild dehydration ie the sort that will recover fine with just a drink of water. They certainly don't suggest its use in any dogs that is suffering the effects of hard running, email them if unsure. Basically drinking salt water will make you piss more after you have drunk more to excrete all that unwanted salt.

So... in the event of collapse from hard running and only in emergency, you recommend....

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Have you ever seen a dog ran to exuastion with 6/7 hour's of constant lamping..i have and they do get bit's water inbetween run's but it does not stop the odd dog from going down hill quick..recharge does i have seen it with my own 2 eye ball's..

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Have you ever seen a dog ran to exuastion with 6/7 hour's of constant lamping..i have and they do get bit's water inbetween run's but it does not stop the odd dog from going down hill quick..recharge does i have seen it with my own 2 eye ball's..

Thats good enough for me! will get some of that when I can

cheers

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Guest Moscow

My experience with recharge.

 

2 nights one using recharge after a run the other not using it.

 

Hard nights running dog was given recharge shortly after the last run, the dog had a long piss half an hour to an hour after given recharge it didnt drink more water than it usually does the next day, didnt seem as stiff and could of been ran the next night.

 

Different night the dog was given the same work but no recharge was given afterwards, the next day the dog drank quite a bit more water than usual even though it was given water shortly after its last run the night before, the dog was stiff next day and didnt look as if it was as fit for running the again that night.

 

Do the maths it seems to work and have benefits to me!

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Interesting...

 

Never been in a situation were I have had to use any Glucose or Mars bars...

 

Do some use on a regular basis??

 

Have people pushed unfit dogs and resulted in them becoming hypoglycemic and exhusted ??

 

Ran my dog to a stand still on two occassions, after warm car journey home shes always walked to the Run and Eaten her meal.

 

Once got some horse stuff cant rember brand was peppermint, Ribos hydration type thing.. Add a few drops to water bowls never seen any difference in Energy levels preformance.. It true purpose was Pre workout for Horses.

 

Somebody once mentioned Fenugreek and dogs, they never got back to dosage etc... Anyone with any thoughts on this ??

 

I took some once, made me smell like a Indian sweated it out pure stinking it even turned my piss :laugh:

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I have not done a good night's lamping now for several year's through dog's dieing and old age..but prior to a suspected hard night the dog's would get a little squirt at the beginning of the night and after and so does Moll..a lad i know had a dog go down a couple of year's back and ended up getting put to sleep as it got brain damage and went blind..if recharge was used that dog may still be with us..

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By electrolytes are people talking about lucozade type drinks or something else

 

What are people thoughts on having a couple of dyralyte (spelling) sachets and some water in the car when you go out to do the same job or would it have to be something a tad more glucose based.

 

I like the post that SoWhat made but in practical terms how would that work? to make up a fresh load to take out with you on a night out on the off chance that a dog collapsed or could it be kept in car more permanently? or kept refrigerated

 

Dioralyte for children is exactly what I was considering giving to my Lurcher during a hard nights graft. Being a childrens supplement, I doubt there will be excessive ammounts of anything which could harm a dog in large doses.

Thats what i was thinking and with it being a sachet was thinking i would be able to leave it in the car in dog 1st aid stuff without it going off like it would over time if it was a pre mixed solution.

 

Other thing is I was trying to figure out and referring to the minshaw thread with dogs collapsing on nghts out etc and reviving them with mars bar in an emmergency. Anyone any views on an ideal solution for this or would dyralyte tick that box as well?

Mars bar contains easily used suger and I used to use them years ago, just used to bite the chocolate off for myself then and give the dogs a piece of the inner every now and then when working hard, one reason I don't normally recommend a brand.As to electrolytes and lucozade the difference is lucozade is glucose drink and electrolytes are salts so they are used for different things, when a child or pup is vomiting or having diarrhea then the fluid its is losing will contain salts so the Dioralyte will replace them, when a dog collapses it is likely depleted its energy reserve and so isn't short of electrolyte but will be short of glucose., or over heated, so it needs the energy reserve, glucose, replacingSo if its not lost electrolytes don't replace them as this may upset the already stressed system. If it is collapsed it may have an element of rhabdomyolysis and with this you get a massive release of the electrolytes from the muscles into the blood which is dangerous to say the least so adding more random electrolytes into the system at this point is, plainly put, bloody stupid.

Ok mate thanks for the answer.

So to try and summarise what your actually saying, in the event of a dog collapsing from exhaustion on a nights lamping dont give electrolytes type stuff to them? What you recommend in their stead then? I am assuming a mars bar is not the ideal solution

Cool it down (they are often suffering heat exhaustion as much as anything), small amount of glucose drink and vets if bad if not to bad then home after cooling and the small drink. Once home light meal and fluids such as an egg in some water with a couple of biscuits. monitor urine if very dark , brown or reddish then likely kidney damage from rabdomyolysis. Better avoided as far as possible by getting dogs fit enough for the work they are to do, feeding carbs prior and during work as I said in the earlier post and keeping an eye on how hot they are getting.

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Giro i have run a very fit saluki based dog to exaustion before today..the warning sign's where there when he started missing and lagging behind..that was him on the lead but it did not stop him going down..recharge was used and he is still here today in retirment.. :victory:

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