Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Gin

Latest Knife On The Go.

Recommended Posts

This is the latest blade i'm working on, its D2 5mm thick bushcraft type.

Brass butt plate.

DSCF0853_zpsydhj3vro.jpg

 

DSCF0855_zpsedw5sc53.jpg

 

DSCF0864_zpsdku2ffvd.jpg

 

DSCF0867_zps2vjrzitp.jpg

 

DSCF0868_zpsgf9z1bks.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea was to peen over onto the brass butt plate, but the knife had been fully heat treated all the way, and you couldn't mark the steel, so the brass plate is silver soldered on.

I'm just glueing the liner to the slab. It will have brass pins. It should look ok i hope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Garteh-Welch-Guardian-1_zps7sv8cl7f.jpg

 

What i hope it looks something like when finished.. This one is my mates

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine will be black micarta,- the wood looks great but i prefer micarta. I normally just do white or light handles but thought mine would look better with all the brass.

Another photo of his. I like the style and feel.

 

Garteh-Welch-Guardian-2_zpsqxy9u3hl.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had used the Araldite 2011 superstrong type, for the liners to the scales, and i would normally use that onto the knife, but my mate swears by the Z epoxy, so i thought i'd give it a go, putting the slabs on the knife. I drill into the scales as you will see, as it increases surface area for glue and better strength.

I will point out thats not fingerprints on the blade, but dust, it will clean off.

Its taken some time to get on with this knife, due to lack of time with work, and a bit of ill-health for a time, but i hope to have it all finished soon.

DSCF0905_zpsaqdtujrw.jpg

 

DSCF0907_zpsveyos5x1.jpg

 

DSCF0908_zpsswfllp51.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although the glue sets in 30 minutes, i will still let it set at least 24 hours before the next stage. The quicker setting time helped with less chance of the scales moving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi gin i use devcon 2 ton epoxy find it exelent stuff i have worked it within 4 hrs but ideally like to leave it a min of 8 hrs by the by d2 steel yes good tuff steel .unfortunatly i dont have the proper kit to heat treat it corectly ,otherwise i would use it ..ithink its a air hardening steel .,heat treated correctly has good edge retension and will take some stick.. ..a good choice for a carbon blade :thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes i agree with you, i also used the Devcon 2 ton epoxy, but i got the Araldite free, and now this Z-poxy,- i would rate all three glues the same, super strength.

My mate is using a place, i'm sure in Consett for the heat treating, i will find out if your interested. I like o1 steel but i hear a lot of good stuff about this D2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ican get it heat treated comecialy vin , just not cost efective unles send a good few blades

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heard D2 was developed during WW2 has high chromium and less sensitive to moisture than most common carbon steels ,though hear it doesnt polish so good ,again not a big concern for a rough use woos knife imo .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

D2 TOOL STEEL:
D2 tool steel first emerged during the World War II era. As this nation’s wartime efforts moved from individual craftsmen working with their hands to mechanization, the inherent toughness and excellent wear resistance found in D2 allowed it to be widely used in stamping dies. The basic formulation of this steel is as follows—carbon 1.40-1.60 percent; chromium 11-12 percent; nickel 0.30 percent; magnesium 0.40-0.60 percent; molybdenum 0.7-1.20 percent; silicone 0.3 percent and vanadium 0.8-1.10 percent. Rockwell hardness range (depending on the manufacturer) is RC 57-62, with blades typically hardened to the upper range. Since D2 is tool steel, it’s susceptible to staining and corrosion. However, when compared with other tool steels, the elevated chromium content (11-12 percent) of the formulation has garnered D2 a reputation for superior corrosion and stain resistance. My own experience in the field with this steel has shown that the effects of environmental attacks (blood, body fluids and ambient moisture) on this steel are restrained if reasonable care is used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×