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Millet

Wild Great Tit Need's Helping.

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Been watching this Great tit in the garden struggling to feed..it was that hungry it was feeding on a crushed up fat ball about 2ft from me..so i have done what i think is correct and caught it up..it's eaten about 10 mealworm which it has struggled with and it is none stop on a crushed up fat ball..

 

Does anyone know what the best thing is to do with it's beak as it is badly overgrown as you can see in the picture..it will be kept in a heated shed till it is fixed and realeased back into the garden. wink.png also how far back should it be trimmed without hitting the vein.

 

BTITbeak_zpsac66bf2c.jpg

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Cheer's for that Paul but will those link's apply to native bird's in the wild.. ;)

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Just my opinion millet but that bird has lived with its deformity for a long time the chances are if you provide it with food in your garden it could live as long again. to cut its beak might kill it.Perhaps someone with knowledge of trimming beaks can help but I know what I would do, Good luck to the bird and u P1

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I've seen those before.

It's mother had an affair with a Humming bird :laugh:

 

Surely the best thing to do would be to knock it on the head or let it go. The surgury thing sounds a bit dodge, I mean wouldn't the beak just grow back?

Best of luck with what ever you decide.

Edited by leegreen
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Cheer's for that Paul but will those link's apply to native bird's in the wild.. ;)

yes mate some do, if it comes around then let it go mate, it will take its chances like the rest :thumbs:

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A true hunter "ahh knock it on the head" u must be one of them big game hunters. :victory:

 

Na mate, just a realist.

Sorry.

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Surely the best thing to do would be to knock it on the head or let it go.

If you had payed money for it and it was in your aviary would you have the same veiw's..regardles of if it was mean't to be or blaa blaa blaa i have found it and it deserve's a chance to live..and that is exactly what it will get..as it will give me no pleasure in killing it but it will give me a lot of pleasure in seeing it fixed and released into the wild.. :yes:

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Surely the best thing to do would be to knock it on the head or let it go.

If you had payed money for it and it was in your aviary would you have the same veiw's..regardles of if it was mean't to be or blaa blaa blaa i have found it and it deserve's a chance to live..and that is exactly what it will get..as it will give me no pleasure in killing it but it will give me a lot of pleasure in seeing it fixed and released into the wild.. :yes:

 

I'm not taking that away from you and I have wished you luck with it, but you asked for an opinion.

 

If it would of been captive bred then I would of intervened (although I choose not to keep caged birds).

But you choose to interfere with nature and seeing as you've bothered to capture it, I think you should do what you think is best.

I personally think you should either let it go or euthanasia it as you see fit. I see little hope for it's survival in the wild if it has difficulty eating as you said and starving to death is a slow unkind end.

But hey nature can be like that.

I also think clipping it's beck will be recklessly stressful to a small wild bird like that even if you knew what you were doing, without antistatic.

 

As I said good luck with it :victory: and that is'nt sarcasm buddy.

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If you do go for the surgery, I think some fine scalpel blades and a bit fine emery board would sort the shaping out a bit.

 

Also someone with a very steady hand to hold your patient still.

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Good man Millet :victory: and i'd be doing the same as you,there are a few good bird men not to far from you that'd try to help you with the trimming but if it were me and i couldn't find help i'd try to get a light behind the bill and see if i could see the vein but if not i'd study a few pics of wild ones and guess at the length needed and trim and file down with a nail file.I'd provide some soft softbill food(a complete food looks a bit like a eggfood mix),mealworms and the fat balls(seeing as it knows there food allready) and see how it goes,if you let it go it'll starve and die that much is true as thats why you have it and just today with no word of a lie i stopped the car(when taking the misses and kids to a kids party),chucked my wellies on and tried to catch a poorly robin across a field as it'd seen it struggling to fly but the poor bugger took refuge in a fallen tree in a frozen pond and i ain't falling through ice for no bird so it'll have to take it's chance now.Good luck with the little thing and keep us informed on progress,

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