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mattyg

Cider......

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I am thinking about organising an apple pressing day over my allotment next year, there are loads of apples left on the trees or rotting on the ground.

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I took apples from twenty different types of apple trees I have here, had them milled and pressed last Saturday at a local orchard group day. Got 24 gallons of great tasting juice, dropped the campden tablets in to kill off the natural yeast,two days later added a champagne yeast to ten gallons in one fermenter and gervin cider yeast to two five gallon containers. Very slow to get going, but the ten gallon and one five are going nicely now, the other I will stir up tonight to see if it wakes it up.

I am keeping them all at 15 degrees (the optimum temperature) to encourage a long slow ferment to retain the fruity flavours.

My only concern is that when I did the ph test I only had the litmus papers that measure 1-11, not the more accurate 1-4, I got a reading of 4! This apparently can cause bad flavour problems.

Hopefully the paper was wrong, the og was 1052 so low 7,s.

Edited by mole trapper

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Vintage is my usual go to cider off the shelf. Aspens Grand Cru is a nice one if I fancy something more dry and fizzy.

I had Flat Tyre in a pub near me on tap, I see they now sell it in cans in Tesco but at £2 each it's over priced so I've never bought it.

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I took apples from twenty different types of apple trees I have here, had them milled and pressed last Saturday at a local orchard group day. Got 24 gallons of great tasting juice, dropped the campden tablets in to kill off the natural yeast,two days later added a champagne yeast to ten gallons in one fermenter and gervin cider yeast to two five gallon containers. Very slow to get going, but the ten gallon and one five are going nicely now, the other I will stir up tonight to see if it wakes it up.

I am keeping them all at 15 degrees (the optimum temperature) to encourage a long slow ferment to retain the fruity flavours.

My only concern is that when I did the ph test I only had the litmus papers that measure 1-11, not the more accurate 1-4, I got a reading of 4! This apparently can cause bad flavour problems.

Hopefully the paper was wrong, the og was 1052 so low 7,s.

How are you managing to keep the temperature at that level?

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I have been looking at easy ways of making a cider press basket or alternative.

From research I think I have an easy way, not done it yet but I think it will work.

Use a 10 litre food grade bucket, I think they can be found free at commercial kitchens.With a hole cutter drill some 15mm holes around the bottom perimeter and a few up the sides of the bucket.

Then buy 4 cheap white plastic chopping boards like the ones they do for 80p in IKEA. Cut them into discs with a jig saw to fit the bucket.

Crush the apples and lay a piece of net curtain over a bowl, fill the bowl with crushed apples, lift the edges of the cloth to make a pouch with the apples and tie up with string.

Put a disc in the bottom of the bucket, pouch of apples, disk, pouch of apples and two disks on top.

Put in press with tray underneath and press.

Because the apples are bagged and layered, they put less pressure on the side of the bucket so it doesn't need to be that strong.

Plus this way you could have one person preparing a bucket while one is pressing, if you double up on buckets and disks.

It is easier to clean and store than a wooden basket too.

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I took apples from twenty different types of apple trees I have here, had them milled and pressed last Saturday at a local orchard group day. Got 24 gallons of great tasting juice, dropped the campden tablets in to kill off the natural yeast,two days later added a champagne yeast to ten gallons in one fermenter and gervin cider yeast to two five gallon containers. Very slow to get going, but the ten gallon and one five are going nicely now, the other I will stir up tonight to see if it wakes it up.

I am keeping them all at 15 degrees (the optimum temperature) to encourage a long slow ferment to retain the fruity flavours.

My only concern is that when I did the ph test I only had the litmus papers that measure 1-11, not the more accurate 1-4, I got a reading of 4! This apparently can cause bad flavour problems.

Hopefully the paper was wrong, the og was 1052 so low 7,s.

How are you managing to keep the temperature at that level?

Quite easy in our house, we haven't lit the rayburn yet!

The kitchen is a nice constant 15 at present, but unfortunately the outlaws are turning up on the first so we will have to light the fire then. Two years ago I had a purpose built concrete shed put up solely for when we go commercial in about three years time, unfortunately though the builder didn't think about vents so it can get a bit warm in there, should be ok to put this lot out there by then though. Let it over winter and hopefully get a malolactic fermentation in the spring.

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Although I've got a bunch of clear plastic PET bottles I also have plenty of brown class bottles (Weston's vintage) and a bottle capper, my question is can I use these bottles for a slightly sparkling cider?

Matt

Edited to add...... You lot seem to know your way round an apple tree so any personal advice from experience would be great.

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From experience of making beer, I would say sure you can, as beer is usually bottle condition, so sugar is added to the bottle for secondary fermentation.

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Although I've got a bunch of clear plastic PET bottles I also have plenty of brown class bottles (Weston's vintage) and a bottle capper, my question is can I use these bottles for a slightly sparkling cider?

Matt

Edited to add...... You lot seem to know your way round an apple tree so any personal advice from experience would be great.

absolutely you can.

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I like a dry cider so I'm just gonna add charging capsules instead of sugar at bottling.....that's the plan anyway!

Not looking to consume to at least March/April or even longer

Matt

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I like a dry cider so I'm just gonna add charging capsules instead of sugar at bottling.....that's the plan anyway!

Not looking to consume to at least March/April or even longer

Matt

You will be fine using a teaspoon full of sugar, it will not come out sweeter as it will be used up by the yeast, I do it all the time, except when I use a dollop of the Mrs honey if she's got frames being emptied when I'm brewing.
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