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New Fiberglass Roof Costs


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#16 foxdropper

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 08:34 pm

Welsh Red .Not trying to belittle you either mate ,just going on what ive seen .That roof system you put a link up for Devon Fighter  is very expensive and no better for it .Two ways of insulating a flat roof 1]insulation just above the ceiling height with air gap between the top boards 2] insulation on top the boards and between the finished coat which requires another support layer of sheet plastic .The rubber finish ive seen and used on jobs is roller applied from a bucket .See you tube on alternate flat roof coverings



#17 Welsh_red

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 09:13 pm

Welsh Red .Not trying to belittle you either mate ,just going on what ive seen .That roof system you put a link up for Devon Fighter  is very expensive and no better for it .Two ways of insulating a flat roof 1]insulation just above the ceiling height with air gap between the top boards 2] insulation on top the boards and between the finished coat which requires another support layer of sheet plastic .The rubber finish ive seen and used on jobs is roller applied from a bucket .See you tube on alternate flat roof coverings


Yeah the rubber I seen was sheets glued down . Probably old fashioned style . We usually cross battern the furring strips to add a bt of ventilation between the seperate joists .

I don't consider you belittling fox dropper , just different experiences and opinions of what to do . Without it there would be no progress without different ideas .
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#18 Rabid

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 09:52 pm

I done several types of flat roofing, and personally, if it was my roof, I would steer away from fibre, expensive materials, and can be a bitch to lay unless conditions are perfect (from a man that has built boats from scratch), and not as long lasting as I would like for the cost.
Given the choice, I would go rubberoid personally.
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#19 devon flighter

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 03:19 pm

rabid  exactly my thought about conditions and expense of material "ive dabbled a bit with boats myself and know exactly what you mean" its just never come accross the newer coatings but the more i read the more inclined i am to try them ,it fairly certain now that this is the way we will go just got to check prices ,plus (and its a big plus for us ) its a job that a handy chippy can do for us (and we have one 1 of them available )



#20 Hydropotesinermis

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 06:21 pm

There are a lot of people doing fiberglass roofing that really haven't got a clue. Done right glass should NEVER crack in heat or sun otherwise there would be a lot of sunken yachts in the Med!

The trouble with glass is that despite some people's observations of how easy it is to lay there is actually a lot of science involved in the curing process, depending on what type of resin and catalyst you use mixing down to the mm can be very important... And yes, moisture or a shower of rain can f**k the whole job up.

Surface prep is so important, not just the material but making it dust free, moisture and chemical free and making sure that any shapes or irregularities are fettled so yhe glass can form properly around them.

My advice when it comes to glass roofs is get a specialist contractor to do the work and expect to pay a lot of money for a job that if done right will last a lifetime. The other option is to pay a lot less to a builder who has done a few and get a jib that will need patching or replacing when it bubbles, peels, gets osmosis, etc etc.

I fixed bubbles in a roof for a guy once and when I asked him what ratio he had mixed catalyst to resin at he told me he had "three quarters filled a bucket and then dribbled the resin for ten seconds..." f***ing wanker.
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#21 Hydropotesinermis

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 06:22 pm

P.s. I juat read rabid's post.

I agree with him.
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#22 DeerhoundLurcherMan

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 07:44 pm

Fibreglass £60 per m2 including boarding. May be cheaper for the bigger jobs.. Very good when done right... As has been said above 2mm planer round the edge to take the pre moulded trims as to stop the thin layer of water puddling.. Also as has been said osb is a must, not ply... And no moisture whatsoever before or recently after... Preparation is key... Charts for catalyst to resin ratios can be found easily on the internet... Using 600gr matting and using the resin UNDER and OVER the matting, it will NOT crack..

Failing that 3 layer torch on felt is also a very good roof when done properly at a guess around £40 per m2..
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#23 devon flighter

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 07:52 pm

Fibreglass £60 per m2 including boarding. May be cheaper for the bigger jobs.. Very good when done right... As has been said above 2mm planer round the edge to take the pre moulded trims as to stop the thin layer of water puddling.. Also as has been said osb is a must, not ply... And no moisture whatsoever before or recently after... Preparation is key... Charts for catalyst to resin ratios can be found easily on the internet... Using 600gr matting and using the resin UNDER and OVER the matting, it will NOT crack..

Failing that 3 layer torch on felt is also a very good roof when done properly at a guess around £40 per m2..

thats the figure i was expecting for a decent job ,but talk of £100/m2 made me think alls not quite as it should be  ;) ,


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#24 DeerhoundLurcherMan

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 08:08 pm

Personally I haven't used the ruberoid rubber stuff but been on jobs with it.. It's a giant puncture repair kit, don't fancy it myself.. Single ply easily pierced... Whereas the fibreglass goes hard, like I could drop a tile on it and barely scratch it.. The 3 layer torch on felt would be my second choice.. Should get 40 years out of the fibreglass and about 25 out of the felt.. If done properly..

I'd be just as concerned with the "putting right" job. Lots of lads who only do flat roofing quite often make a lovely job of the flat roof but bodge any valleys or verges back in that may have been in their way.. Or leave it and say they didn't quote to put it back as it was..
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#25 Hydropotesinermis

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 08:54 pm

The other thing I didn't mention is not only the resin. There is glass matt and there is glass matt. Different densities of chopped strand will obviously cost more or less... I haven't done any glassing in a bloody long time but I would be looking at doing a complex of chopped strand, biaxial matt and then chopped strand again, whereas some may try to get away without the biaxial matt or even just use a single layer of chopped strand.

Deerhound sounds like he knows his stuff so may advise better on this but again be wary of a cheap job because it could mean they are using shite matt.

#26 Hydropotesinermis

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 08:55 pm

Also Deerhound do people still use the vibrating consolidation rollers?

f***ing things used to drive me nuts. Vrrrr vrrrrr vrrrrr.

#27 DeerhoundLurcherMan

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:29 pm

Yes! That must be the posh word for them haha! Vrrrrrm!
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#28 foxdropper

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 07:04 am

IMG_1853.jpgIMG_1854.jpg

This for me at least is the way to go for flat roof .No major weather issues after laying .Cheap and long lasting ,no sheets therefore no joins .Expands contracts job done .
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#29 Denny essex

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 01:40 pm

I have laid glassfibre on many roofs , ponds and all sorts of mouldings for over 40 years in the trade before retiring.

I have not had or any of my associates had an expansion crack, not saying it cant happen but I never experienced it even on roofs I have done on southend sea front, including some roofs that were stoned/chipped for walking on .






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