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ditchman

re-building a treasured knife

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after i post this thread you will all suddenly realise that i am a hopeless lost case...in short a muppet..........these sort of disasters really float my boat....the knife was and is very special to someone and they didnt want to throw it away...so they sent it to me for a larf.........................i will post later as i need to do some shoppin..............

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cant quite get them in order....but you get the idea.....my mate dave sent me a bit of D2....which is nice to work ...nice and soft....and when you harden it you bring it to temperature and let air harden....you dont quench it in water or oil....you get very little wharp using that spec steel....then it was annealed later as i will show............

 

ditch

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D2 needs a long soak at temp to dissolve carbides and distribute carbon. The carbides are big and spheroidized. Otherwise you get a weak and uneven structure. It needs 30-35 minutes at temp for the carbon to dissolve and even out. You don't need to worry about grain growth from a long soak in D2, there are so many things in there pinning grain boundaries you could soak it an hour and the only problem would be too much carbon in solution, not grain growth.

Unless you have two ovens I suggest skipping the presoak (it doesn't do much for a knife) and going directly into an oven at full temp. This is because cheap knifemakers ovens tend to over heat areas in the oven and on the blade due to radiant heat from exposed coils so close to the work during an extended ramp up.

A simple HT for D2 that works pretty reliably:
Soak at 1880 30 min
plate quench to under 400F
Straighten any little bends with gloved hands while still hot if possible
go directly into subzero
temper twice in the range of 400-500. You can fixture to correct any bends during temper

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cheers............it didnt get a soak............just into the forge long and slow...and air cooled...then annealed as i said.....which has worked out fine.......its had a years hard use since i finished it...no probs yet

prefer to work with O1 tho......

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cut and shaped the blade on my old slow running 1930 linnisher...gave it a full scandi cut/grind both sides............and started to fit ebony scales to it..........

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What a wonderful project!!! 

A knife from the Golden age of Sheffield knifemaking that definetly deserves a new life. 

A pity you couldn't safe the stag scales but ebony is historic correct, too. 

Was this a rope knife or pruner? Or cotton knife? 

Regards 

Nicolas 

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Btw. The brand seems to be 

W. SAYNOR SHEFFIELD 

 

 W Saynor & Co., active 1858-1965

Im1951Benn-Saynor3.jpg.8c0e291516e801ea392c671b44c344a1.jpg

Edited by spsurfer
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36 minutes ago, spsurfer said:

What a wonderful project!!! 

A knife from the Golden age of Sheffield knifemaking that definetly deserves a new life. 

A pity you couldn't safe the stag scales but ebony is historic correct, too. 

Was this a rope knife or pruner? Or cotton knife? 

Regards 

Nicolas 

it was used as a shepards knife paring hoofs ....as it is still being used for that purpose this very day....i rekon it must be nearly 100 years old......the horn was totally knackered as you can see..........

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30 minutes ago, spsurfer said:

Btw. The brand seems to be 

W. SAYNOR SHEFFIELD 

 

 W Saynor & Co., active 1858-1965

Im1951Benn-Saynor3.jpg.8c0e291516e801ea392c671b44c344a1.jpg

now that is seriously interesting ...cheers for that .........

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starting to "match" it together now...getting the metal to wood fit right...im using bronze pins for the scales and steel for the spring fulcrum point and the blade hinge........

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Will be as good as new with added character. I would not polish out the rust pits in the bolsters. 

 

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1 minute ago, spsurfer said:

Will be as good as new with added character. I would not polish out the rust pits in the bolsters. 

 

quite right............ive left the pitting in...and ontop of the spring....👍

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That’s a lovely job and a lovely project, nothing but respect for that level of detail 👍👍👍👍

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46 minutes ago, Greyman said:

That’s a lovely job and a lovely project, nothing but respect for that level of detail 👍👍👍👍

well you know what they say "idle hands will mistrief make ".............

christ my eyes are going funny ...just got so many snaps of stuff ive done over the years....................

anyway thats how it ended up ...

cheers for the comments 👍

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Edited by ditchman
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That is brilliant workmanship - you are very skilled - I love it!

I would be absolutely delighted with that result if I was the owner of that knife....I'd love to see the expression on their  face when you produce it.

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