Jump to content

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, micky said:

I have never felt the need to alter this type of trap as i find that they work for me with no form of adjustment, i think it is a type of vanity to adjust something that has been designed and tested by experts , i know its horses for courses but if it touches those prongs its dead , keep it simple ,the thinking has been done for you, and as with all traps placement is the key 

Let me ask you this micky. Do you prefer using traps which have triggers or pans? 

 

I don't believe novelty plays a part to be honest. Trap avoidance can be a real problem with wire triggers. Especially those bell trIngers when it comes to things like mink or rabbits. Why even in Darcy's video i think it shows a rabbit avoiding going through one of those triggers. Yea right rats and squirrel will push through them the majority of times, but not all animals are as easy catch as a squirrel. 

For me, I want my traps to work to their full potential, and if adding a pan to a bodygrip results in more catches, then I think it's something to consider.

 

Share this post


Link to post

22 hours ago, micky said:

I have never felt the need to alter this type of trap as i find that they work for me with no form of adjustment, i think it is a type of vanity to adjust something that has been designed and tested by experts , i know its horses for courses but if it touches those prongs its dead , keep it simple ,the thinking has been done for you, and as with all traps placement is the key 

But see the diffrence changes in raising your snare height and breakaway snares have done to snaring this will help with trapping im against making changes for changes sake  but these will help i reckon with the more timid trapping animals 

Share this post


Link to post
18 hours ago, EDDIE B said:

Let me ask you this micky. Do you prefer using traps which have triggers or pans? 

 

I don't believe novelty plays a part to be honest. Trap avoidance can be a real problem with wire triggers. Especially those bell trIngers when it comes to things like mink or rabbits. Why even in Darcy's video i think it shows a rabbit avoiding going through one of those triggers. Yea right rats and squirrel will push through them the majority of times, but not all animals are as easy catch as a squirrel. 

For me, I want my traps to work to their full potential, and if adding a pan to a bodygrip results in more catches, then I think it's something to consider.

 

I set BGs for Rats, Rabbits ,and Squirrels and nothing else though over the years i have caught   many other things them as any one  would do when using this trap, to me the ideal place to set this trap is in a wire fence , if i can i set them an inch off of the ground and on the first notch ,to the Rabbit the trap is part of the fence that it will pass through many times in a day as will many more creatures as they have no fear of fences which are part of there daily life,what Rabbits fear is scent if you watch Rabbits they are constantly tasting the air and they react instantly to an alien scent and i believe this is the reason that they sometimes appear to refuse entering a trap and on utube there is a film of a rabbit actually doing this it tries many times to go through the wire but stops and sniffs it does not look it scents and knows some thing is amiss.  So i do not think that a Pan  adds to this trap in fact i would go the other way and say it detracts and adds weight , clutter, and scent, the only modification i have made to any trap was to fit trail legs to  few BGs and this made them easier to stabilize in some awkward  spots..................Just to say i knew three lads in Norfolk who done a lot of trapping  they were very old fashioned in there methods and so was there kit but they caught a lot of Rabbits , the eldest of this trio always rubbed is hands in a Doe's piss before he started. 

Share this post


Link to post
8 minutes ago, micky said:

I set BGs for Rats, Rabbits ,and Squirrels and nothing else though over the years i have caught   many other things them as any one  would do when using this trap, to me the ideal place to set this trap is in a wire fence , if i can i set them an inch off of the ground and on the first notch ,to the Rabbit the trap is part of the fence that it will pass through many times in a day as will many more creatures as they have no fear of fences which are part of there daily life,what Rabbits fear is scent if you watch Rabbits they are constantly tasting the air and they react instantly to an alien scent and i believe this is the reason that they sometimes appear to refuse entering a trap and on utube there is a film of a rabbit actually doing this it tries many times to go through the wire but stops and sniffs it does not look it scents and knows some thing is amiss.  So i do not think that a Pan  adds to this trap in fact i would go the other way and say it detracts and adds weight , clutter, and scent, the only modification i have made to any trap was to fit trail legs to  few BGs and this made them easier to stabilize in some awkward  spots..................Just to say i knew three lads in Norfolk who done a lot of trapping  they were very old fashioned in there methods and so was there kit but they caught a lot of Rabbits , the eldest of this trio always rubbed is hands in a Doe's piss before he started. 

I think the pan is pretty pointless also Micky... just found a post from a 8 year ago with some images,  time goes quick..

 

Share this post


Link to post

Nice to see that one again Ian , still fresh and interesting after all those years:thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
48 minutes ago, micky said:

I set BGs for Rats, Rabbits ,and Squirrels and nothing else though over the years i have caught   many other things them as any one  would do when using this trap, to me the ideal place to set this trap is in a wire fence , if i can i set them an inch off of the ground and on the first notch ,to the Rabbit the trap is part of the fence that it will pass through many times in a day as will many more creatures as they have no fear of fences which are part of there daily life,what Rabbits fear is scent if you watch Rabbits they are constantly tasting the air and they react instantly to an alien scent and i believe this is the reason that they sometimes appear to refuse entering a trap and on utube there is a film of a rabbit actually doing this it tries many times to go through the wire but stops and sniffs it does not look it scents and knows some thing is amiss.  So i do not think that a Pan  adds to this trap in fact i would go the other way and say it detracts and adds weight , clutter, and scent, the only modification i have made to any trap was to fit trail legs to  few BGs and this made them easier to stabilize in some awkward  spots..................Just to say i knew three lads in Norfolk who done a lot of trapping  they were very old fashioned in there methods and so was there kit but they caught a lot of Rabbits , the eldest of this trio always rubbed is hands in a Doe's piss before he started. 

Well each to their own I suppose. Personally from experience, I know I catch more with the pans, with t he type of trapping I do. I think theyou really shine used in cubby's, pockets etc. Don't get me wrong, I still use wire triggers also. But even at that, I tend to modify them to suit my needs. 

I always try to keep an eye on what trappers are doing in the US., and pans are really catching on there. I think those guy's know a thing or two about trapping, don't they.  Ain't saying their the B all and end all, but certainly no novelty piece.

Share this post


Link to post

So out of curiousity , whats the common way to treat conis over there ? Spray paint or trap dip/dye are the main ways its done. Personally spray paint lets me camo spray paint them to where they basically disappear in a trail.....though it is a pain when you cant see them and you slam your foot in one 😂😂😂

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, Wolfdog91 said:

So out of curiousity , whats the common way to treat conis over there ? Spray paint or trap dip/dye are the main ways its done. Personally spray paint lets me camo spray paint them to where they basically disappear in a trail.....though it is a pain when you cant see them and you slam your foot in one 😂😂😂

Personally I spray paint with rustopium.  I find it both easy on the pocket and it holds up well, even in water. Lots on here don't bother treating traps at all. They don't feel the need, and who am I to argue lol

Share this post


Link to post

Now for a daft thought i sprayed mine matt green even the stands but no the cubbys :laugh: The fens i never touch and they are okay with patchy surface rust 

Share this post


Link to post

Over time i have had many traps fired with no catch , Fenn 6s  are the worst  but it will happen with all traps , there are lots of reasons why this can happen but i think in my case it is the target  moving slow on to the plate and it gives them time to react which usually mean jumping back or to  side, this to me explains why you have so , so many head catches or in the case of small rabbits rear leg catches  in fen traps. To me the beauty of a standard Bodygrip  trap is that the animal is in the kill zone  as it fires the trap  , it has no split second warning  as it would get by stepping on a plate , to counteract this some people try to set there traps very lightly but also that is not without its problems  and i would sooner spend more time bedding a trap well than fiddling with Tongues and plates , as i think any one over sixty would . This is my own opinion that i have reached by thinking about why things that i have done that did not work the way i thought it would and listening  to older and wiser people and sometimes younger and wiser people .

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, micky said:

Over time i have had many traps fired with no catch , Fenn 6s  are the worst  but it will happen with all traps , there are lots of reasons why this can happen but i think in my case it is the target  moving slow on to the plate and it gives them time to react which usually mean jumping back or to  side, this to me explains why you have so , so many head catches or in the case of small rabbits rear leg catches  in fen traps. To me the beauty of a standard Bodygrip  trap is that the animal is in the kill zone  as it fires the trap  , it has no split second warning  as it would get by stepping on a plate , to counteract this some people try to set there traps very lightly but also that is not without its problems  and i would sooner spend more time bedding a trap well than fiddling with Tongues and plates , as i think any one over sixty would . This is my own opinion that i have reached by thinking about why things that i have done that did not work the way i thought it would and listening  to older and wiser people and sometimes younger and wiser people .

But think about it micky. What would slow an animal quicker, a pan which could be covered with leaves or grass etc, or wires which have to be pushed out of the way with the animals face. One aspect of using pans on a bodygrip is that for the most part, it results in a body, or as they say suitcase catch. I think thats what we all aim for. That animal see's nothing in its way. Nothing to slow it down. Wires, especially unmodified, means he has to squeeze through it. You mentioned rabbits etc going through fences all the time, and that's tru. You also said that you find bodygrips work well on fences and that's where you use them.

But the thing is your limiting the trap. I use both for different situations. For a hole in a bank or root system I think the pan will shine. Also like them in baited cubby's. I'll use wires on fencelines and runs. 

The only other thing I can say is "don't knock it till you try it" lol

 

Share this post


Link to post

You have missed my point what i thought that i  had made clear , every creature in the world knows when something moves under their feet and react when i was young i worked on tall industrial chimneys believe me when you climb those ladders you are aware of every thing about you if you step on a rung that is a fraction more worn than the others you react, you will grip tighter is you are no high steel and tread on a paint splash it will feel like you have trod on a brick , you instantly know something is not quite right because we are all hot wired for survival when a rabbit steps on that pan and it goes down it will know in a mini fration of a second that something is wrong and react to the best of its ability.

i am not knocking how others  do things i just cannot see the point  of altering the trigger on a BG they work well as they are and if you are having trouble catching  things in them the first  thing that i looked at would be placement or bait.

Share this post


Link to post
6 hours ago, micky said:

You have missed my point what i thought that i  had made clear , every creature in the world knows when something moves under their feet and react when i was young i worked on tall industrial chimneys believe me when you climb those ladders you are aware of every thing about you if you step on a rung that is a fraction more worn than the others you react, you will grip tighter is you are no high steel and tread on a paint splash it will feel like you have trod on a brick , you instantly know something is not quite right because we are all hot wired for survival when a rabbit steps on that pan and it goes down it will know in a mini fration of a second that something is wrong and react to the best of its ability.

i am not knocking how others  do things i just cannot see the point  of altering the trigger on a BG they work well as they are and if you are having trouble catching  things in them the first  thing that i looked at would be placement or bait.

Yea I see where your coming from micky. Thing is, with the bodygrip, it's already too late. The head is already inside those jaws. An animal instinctively jumps when a trap goes off. Can jump clear of a fenn, if cubby etc is too hIgh, but the top jaw of the bodygrip won't allow that. 

Why the majority of traps use the pan trigger. :hmm:

 

Anyway, think we're going around in circles here. I know an old boy who traps a lot of mink each winter. Thirty to forty a year, and he'll use nothing only Fenn. I asked him once, would he not try the bodygrips, tube traps etc? He answered, naaa, sure why would I!  I get all I want with the Fenn's. 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×