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Blog Comparisons Between Training Kelpie Vs Collie Pups


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#1 reddog70

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 11:38 pm

found these comparison training blogs quite interesting, anyone else here worked these different breeds to cattle or sheep, would be interesting to hear your experience of them.

https://www.workings...epdog-training/

#2 Blackdog92

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 07:06 am

I don't have to read that to tell you that kelpies are tw@ts, if you want an easy life don't get one 😂
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#3 Neal

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:18 am

That's quite an old blog, unless he's added to it again since I last read it a few years back.

 

Blackdog: don't sit on the fence...tell us what you really think. :D 

 

Personally I like a dog which is a bit of a twat...dog's should be like their owners. :blink: 


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#4 Phil Lloyd

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 09:37 am

The guy who did the Blog is an experienced trainer of Border Collies,...  :yes:

 

However, I feel his attitude towards the herders, is a lot like my own late Father's ...

 

Folk don't always accept change,..in fact, a lot of guys, (lurchermen included), find it hard to take in anything new,..

 

Better the Devil ya know, kinda thing,... :laugh: 

 

In some cases, even when appearing to give a fresh project, a fair do,.their minds are already made up,.. the exercise is doomed to failure,.. from the start. :thumbs:  


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#5 Blackdog92

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 10:05 am

Don't get me wrong Neal, they have there uses, and are tough as nails and will work all day and do they same the next but they aren't suited to part time work and need to be doing something constantly or they will find something to do. The couple I have are extremely independent and I'm basically the courier to and frow there destinations lol even the 1/4 kelpie 3/4 curs I've bred still have a lot of the same traits as in the pures.

I do like them, one of mine is free range 365 days a year and is never in a kennel is great as a yard dog and working in the sheep pens but when I want to do jobs where I need a bit more control I will always go for the fell curs.

A few of the farmers round me have started to get huntaways as well, most are still saplings so time will tell how they turn out.
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#6 reddog70

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 10:35 am

interesting black dog..would seem that going by your quarter bred that the kelpie gene can be carried and quite dominant in crosses,would you agree with those that say the kelpie can be more free thinking and will challenge commands if it thinks it knows best..

#7 Blackdog92

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:06 am

IMO yes without a doubt, at least mine are like that.

I think the kelpie gene must be strong, at least in the way my litter had thrown, they are a lot smaller than what I expected to be and have a very kelpieish look about them, along with the mentality.
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#8 bird

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:43 am

IMO yes without a doubt, at least mine are like that.

I think the kelpie gene must be strong, at least in the way my litter had thrown, they are a lot smaller than what I expected to be and have a very kelpieish look about them, along with the mentality.

you are right , the kelpie  gene is strong , i had a 1x  kelpie x collie x grey, and  it was differnt to my straight collie x greys that ive had and still got, it mind set was different more head strong . :yes:   . From a lurcher owner perspective , if i learned anything  in the 30 years with lurchers, you deff (dont) need alot of herding blood in a lurcher  a 1/4 more than enough , feck me how clever as a  lurcher got  to be to catch a rabbit lol, any dog will learn to how to use its nose in the day ferreting if shown enough  , and  night time lamping the more they do the better get , what ever the type x    :yes:   it was good read   if i was going to have a collie or kelpie  or acd   gene in my lurcher , i have dogs that worked cattle   , something with bit of grit about them  , not the over sensitive  fawning  nature you can get with alot of collies , that just bred for sheep work , you dont need that mind set in any dog never mind a lurcher  that got to  handle  what ever the  quarry  it put on  .   :yes:  


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#9 Neal

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 05:51 pm

I agree with you blackdog: some kelpies just find it hard to switch off as do some examples of other breeds. I guess I was just lucky with my first in that he had an off button, whereas my current bitch is more keen. That's why, when I booked his replacement, I found one which was linebred to the individual in his breeding who made him that way. Noggin's been even more easygoing than old Rust and my next pup (which should be born next March from a repeat mating of Noggin's cousin to an imported male) has a similar number of lines to the same dog. Only time will tell.

Re your comment about them using their own initiative, I definitely find the same and it's what I've always liked about them but, as you know, it can have its downside. I always let mine hunt up everything for themselves but when I see something they've not winded it's a bugger of a job to get them to believe me. I once had a collie x whippet which was far and away the most obedient dog I've ever owned but she had zero initiative whereas my kelpies have initiative in abundance but usually need every request made at least twice...I say request rather than instruction as, psychologically, it makes me feel better when they "cock a deaf un." For example, stopping them from chasing a rabbit towards a busy road would sound like, "Aahhh! Leave it...LEAVE IT...F***ing leave it you prick eared bar steward!" But they would then stop. In comparison, Skye (the collie x whippet) would have stopped when I tutted! But the other side of the coin is that their "willingness to comply" is so great that they read my body language much quicker once they decide to accept my point of view. Eg Noggin took a while to break to deer but by about six months old, once he'd realised they were off limits, he became an extremely proficient deer marking dog and I'm now always aware of their presence even in this dense Hampshire woodland whereas previously I may have walked past oblivious to their presence.
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#10 Blackdog92

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:51 pm



my kelpies have initiative in abundance but usually need every request made at least twice...I say request rather than instruction as, psychologically, it makes me feel better when they "cock a deaf un." For example, stopping them from chasing a rabbit towards a busy road would sound like, "Aahhh! Leave it...LEAVE IT...F***ing leave it you prick eared bar steward!" But they would then stop.


Glad I'm not the only one 😂

I don't use mine for hunting but like most dogs if they see a small furry, there going after it.

Bobs caught a couple bunnies in his years, and I'm still trying to retrieve them.

#11 reddog70

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:53 pm

Thank you all for the interesting input.. Neal there's no putting you off kelpies 😁hope you enjoy your new pup when the the time comes.. Phil and Ray when you kept kelpie lurchers do you remember what height the dogs and bitches made? was there much difference in the height than collie xs

Edited by reddog70, 07 October 2017 - 07:54 pm.


#12 Neal

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:45 am

my kelpies have initiative in abundance but usually need every request made at least twice...I say request rather than instruction as, psychologically, it makes me feel better when they "cock a deaf un." For example, stopping them from chasing a rabbit towards a busy road would sound like, "Aahhh! Leave it...LEAVE IT...F***ing leave it you prick eared bar steward!" But they would then stop.

Glad I'm not the only one
I don't use mine for hunting but like most dogs if they see a small furry, there going after it.
Bobs caught a couple bunnies in his years, and I'm still trying to retrieve them.
Rusty couldn't help retrieving everything he caught...and everything the others caught too...as he was a natural retriever and Noggin's the same but Scout eats everything she catches unless I spot the catch. I've last count of the number of times she's gone missing for a few minutes (very unusual for her) and then returned with pigeon down stuck to her cheek, all sweetness and innocence. I put it down to her following a winged one for several hundred yards across two fields as a pup before making a catch which gave her the confidence to think they were always possible whereas most dogs give up on feather as a lost cause.

Edited by Neal, 08 October 2017 - 10:46 am.

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