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What Have You Learned


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#1 DIDO.1

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:23 pm

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...

Next year I'll have an allotment so this year has been a learning curve with a couple of raised beds and a plastic greenhouse.

I've learned how to pickle beetroot.
Always net cabbages, checking for eggs isn't enough.
Greenhouse ventilation is important.
Net my strawberries.
Don't plant things to close together and thin out properly.
Keep on top of slugs.
Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine
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#2 Tiercel

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:37 pm

Over the years I have learnt that there is no such thing as hard and fast rules, what works one year will not always work the next. The only thing I can say that is a certainty, is that every year is uncertain and there are no hard and fast rules.

 

TC



#3 Tiercel

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:43 pm

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...


Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

Again no guarantee's it depends on time of year and weather patterns. All things being equal it should work, the only problem is things are rarely equal.

 

TC



#4 DIDO.1

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:49 pm


What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...


Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

Again no guarantee's it depends on time of year and weather patterns. All things being equal it should work, the only problem is things are rarely equal.
 
TC

I've planted loads of raddish....my whole family loves them. We had a week of misformed raddish followed by a month of non....now Iv got a million misformed ones again lol

Planted to many all together at one time. Next year I will aim for raddish all season! 😂👍
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#5 sussex

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:13 pm

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...
Next year I'll have an allotment so this year has been a learning curve with a couple of raised beds and a plastic greenhouse.
I've learned how to pickle beetroot.
Always net cabbages, checking for eggs isn't enough.
Greenhouse ventilation is important.
Net my strawberries.
Don't plant things to close together and thin out properly.
Keep on top of slugs.
Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine


wont be using plugs for carrots next year ,
Plant just one quarter of the beetroots ive planted this year ( or find more people to take them )
Net the soft fruit I must have feed every bird in Sussex
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#6 smithie

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:34 pm

If you don't know just ask.

Every body on the allotment thinks there way is best.
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#7 terryd

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:37 pm

 

 

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...


Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

Again no guarantee's it depends on time of year and weather patterns. All things being equal it should work, the only problem is things are rarely equal.
 
TC

I've planted loads of raddish....my whole family loves them. We had a week of misformed raddish followed by a month of non....now Iv got a million misformed ones again lol

Planted to many all together at one time. Next year I will aim for raddish all season!

 

 

get more in now they go like hell. Going to sow more stuff tomorrow lettuce etc


Edited by terryd, 14 July 2017 - 07:38 pm.


#8 DIDO.1

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:07 pm

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...
Next year I'll have an allotment so this year has been a learning curve with a couple of raised beds and a plastic greenhouse.
I've learned how to pickle beetroot.
Always net cabbages, checking for eggs isn't enough.
Greenhouse ventilation is important.
Net my strawberries.
Don't plant things to close together and thin out properly.
Keep on top of slugs.
Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

wont be using plugs for carrots next year ,
Plant just one quarter of the beetroots ive planted this year ( or find more people to take them )
Net the soft fruit I must have feed every bird in Sussex

I'm doing more of them. Just planted another row. Mrs loves em pickled

#9 Tiercel

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:23 pm

 

 

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...


Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

Again no guarantee's it depends on time of year and weather patterns. All things being equal it should work, the only problem is things are rarely equal.
 
TC

I've planted loads of raddish....my whole family loves them. We had a week of misformed raddish followed by a month of non....now Iv got a million misformed ones again lol

Planted to many all together at one time. Next year I will aim for raddish all season!

 

All you can do is sow and hope the weather gods are kind to you. :thumbs:

 

TC



#10 sussex

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:24 pm


What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...
Next year I'll have an allotment so this year has been a learning curve with a couple of raised beds and a plastic greenhouse.
I've learned how to pickle beetroot.
Always net cabbages, checking for eggs isn't enough.
Greenhouse ventilation is important.
Net my strawberries.
Don't plant things to close together and thin out properly.
Keep on top of slugs.
Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

wont be using plugs for carrots next year ,
Plant just one quarter of the beetroots ive planted this year ( or find more people to take them )
Net the soft fruit I must have feed every bird in Sussex
I'm doing more of them. Just planted another row. Mrs loves em pickled
Me to , but I've got more pickled beetroot than you can shake a stick at 😀And there's at least 30 more , what on earth I planted all that for god only knows ..I bought the seed on the tape and never expected everything to grow , but it did ..perhaps just one pack next year although I can't see me eating all this years ..

#11 DIDO.1

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:33 pm

Post em up to me! Swop you for 1kg of mis formed raddish

#12 terryd

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:44 pm

 

 

 

What lessons have you learned in the garden this year...
Next year I'll have an allotment so this year has been a learning curve with a couple of raised beds and a plastic greenhouse.
I've learned how to pickle beetroot.
Always net cabbages, checking for eggs isn't enough.
Greenhouse ventilation is important.
Net my strawberries.
Don't plant things to close together and thin out properly.
Keep on top of slugs.
Do regular plantings of fast growing crops to give a consistent harvest rather than feast and famine

wont be using plugs for carrots next year ,
Plant just one quarter of the beetroots ive planted this year ( or find more people to take them )
Net the soft fruit I must have feed every bird in Sussex
I'm doing more of them. Just planted another row. Mrs loves em pickled
Me to , but I've got more pickled beetroot than you can shake a stick at And there's at least 30 more , what on earth I planted all that for god only knows ..I bought the seed on the tape and never expected everything to grow , but it did ..perhaps just one pack next year although I can't see me eating all this years ..

 

 

all  ways the same you plant half a dozen of some thing and all fail so you plant 50 and they all come but  I know which I would rather  :laugh:


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#13 jok

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:55 pm

I think the worst thing about our gardening is our seemingly inability to deal with annual problems with any conviction. I' on about potato and tomato blight, club root (which to my horror I have), pea moth, carrot fly, ants and a hoste of others. Strangely, my neighbour said 'what does a pea moth look like' and I haven't a clue. Just that little grub in the pod. Other things like white and black fly, butterflies, pigeons and rabbits you can see and take care of. Another of my neighbours looked at her cauliflower in shock and asked me what had gone wrong. Club root. She lost the lot. We are restricted to what is allowed as regards sprays etc but it makes you wonder what the local farmers are allowed to get away with. How do the young lads and lasses learn about these problems without old time knowledge? Jok.

#14 terryd

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:03 pm

I just grow clubroot resistant stuff Jok there are a few varieties apart from winter stuff which doesn't suffer from it.

The seed is dearer but well worth it

 

these are kilaton and they looking great now 

 

34791791541_3dab1e2f8d_c.jpg

 

It has taken over 18 years of conventional breeding to develop a variety that can combat the devastating brassica disease Clubroot, and this superb variety is the most resistant we have ever grown on our trials. This clubroot resistant cabbage produces excellent quality, 2kg, autumn ballheads with a solid, dense structure. Cabbage 'Kilaton' is superb for making coleslaws, salads or steaming. This F1 hybrid variety will stand outdoors over a long period, and once harvested stores well without any deterioration to its delicious flavour. Height: 30cm (12"). Spread: 45cm (12").



#15 jok

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:26 pm

Terry. Storage but true. In my white netted enclosure, 24 Brussels and 12 cabbage unaffected, same row all calabrese and the caulifower completely decimated. Outside the covering, all brassicas unaffected. Why?. I'll put up some pics when I get back from hols. Jok.




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