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CraignTod

Chest Lumps?

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Ok so since the bitch has had her first season shes been getting these lumps down her chest/belly, all in line with her tits.

I thought it might be milk deposits from phantom pregnancy as they are fairly firm and seem to disappear then return in different areas.

There not painful and dont seem to bother her.

 

Just want to ask if its an cause for concern as shes had them for around 2 months now?

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14 months, she came into season at around 11 months and she entire.

 

I dont suspect mastitis as that is painful.

Edited by CraignTod

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It is the pregnancy hormones which are produced after a season. Even though she is not pregnant the bitch's body prepares itself for birth, and the mammary glands get bigger and sometimes produce milk. Whilst it is more unusual for a bitch to show this amount of swelling after her very first season, it can happen. Some vets say that the more pronounced the swelling the greater potential the bitch has to develop mammary cancer ...eventually, and probably not for many years, but it does happen. I can't say whether this is true or not for both cases of mammary cancer I've had in my own dogs didn't develop until the bitches were well over 6 years old, but they both had obvious swelling after their seasons.

When you think that a pregnancy lasts for 9 weeks, then 2 months of swelling isn't abnormal because the bitch would be feeding pups for at least another month after the 9 week pregnancy is finished, usually. It should disappear once her hormones have settled down again, but do keep an eye out for any lumps which don't disappear completely, as they may be problematic and need checking out.

 

The more overweight a bitch is the more her mammary glands will swell, and in fat or older bitches, even those which haven't been bred from , it is not unusual to find that fat settles in that area.

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It is the pregnancy hormones which are produced after a season. Even though she is not pregnant the bitch's body prepares itself for birth, and the mammary glands get bigger and sometimes produce milk. Whilst it is more unusual for a bitch to show this amount of swelling after her very first season, it can happen. Some vets say that the more pronounced the swelling the greater potential the bitch has to develop mammary cancer ...eventually, and probably not for many years, but it does happen. I can't say whether this is true or not for both cases of mammary cancer I've had in my own dogs didn't develop until the bitches were well over 6 years old, but they both had obvious swelling after their seasons.

When you think that a pregnancy lasts for 9 weeks, then 2 months of swelling isn't abnormal because the bitch would be feeding pups for at least another month after the 9 week pregnancy is finished, usually. It should disappear once her hormones have settled down again, but do keep an eye out for any lumps which don't disappear completely, as they may be problematic and need checking out.

 

The more overweight a bitch is the more her mammary glands will swell, and in fat or older bitches, even those which haven't been bred from , it is not unusual to find that fat settles in that area.

Would you say spaying the bitch would help stop mammary tumors in the future?

I know they predominantly occur in later years aswell as mastitis.

If the lumps remain then what course of action will the vet suggest? Thanks for the reply

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The milky lumps will disappear, though some bitches get really hard bits that take ages to go. It is said that these can be the cause of problem later in life. And yes, if she is spayed then that stops 99% of tumours. As mammary cancer is linked with changing hormone levels and the effect that has on mammary tissue, once there are no more ups and downs in hormone levels the risk is greatly decreased.

 

If you took the bitch to the vet he would advise spaying her at the earliest opportunity, but then, vets all suggest that no matter what. Don't worry, the lumps will definitely go, but as this is her first season she is likely to have the same thing after each season. Some bitches never get it, others really suffer after a season and get quite down, and it softens their muscles as well, making it very hard to keep them fit.

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Sound advice skycat, thanks for taking the time to reply.

The reason i asked about the vets treatment was i didnt know if there was any actial treatment to help remove the lumps as im not keen on spaying her.

Atb

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It is the pregnancy hormones which are produced after a season. Even though she is not pregnant the bitch's body prepares itself for birth, and the mammary glands get bigger and sometimes produce milk. Whilst it is more unusual for a bitch to show this amount of swelling after her very first season, it can happen. Some vets say that the more pronounced the swelling the greater potential the bitch has to develop mammary cancer ...eventually, and probably not for many years, but it does happen. I can't say whether this is true or not for both cases of mammary cancer I've had in my own dogs didn't develop until the bitches were well over 6 years old, but they both had obvious swelling after their seasons.

When you think that a pregnancy lasts for 9 weeks, then 2 months of swelling isn't abnormal because the bitch would be feeding pups for at least another month after the 9 week pregnancy is finished, usually. It should disappear once her hormones have settled down again, but do keep an eye out for any lumps which don't disappear completely, as they may be problematic and need checking out.

 

The more overweight a bitch is the more her mammary glands will swell, and in fat or older bitches, even those which haven't been bred from , it is not unusual to find that fat settles in that area.

Would you say spaying the bitch would help stop mammary tumors in the future?

I know they predominantly occur in later years aswell as mastitis.

If the lumps remain then what course of action will the vet suggest? Thanks for the reply

 

Great advice from Skycat!! it's a young bitches body adapting to hormones etc...

 

 

yes, spaying a bitch will reduce the risk of mammary cancer and pyometra (Obviously) in dogs by a huge amount. Spaying does not affect working ability, but, it all depends if you want to breed her in the future... :victory:

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It is the pregnancy hormones which are produced after a season. Even though she is not pregnant the bitch's body prepares itself for birth, and the mammary glands get bigger and sometimes produce milk. Whilst it is more unusual for a bitch to show this amount of swelling after her very first season, it can happen. Some vets say that the more pronounced the swelling the greater potential the bitch has to develop mammary cancer ...eventually, and probably not for many years, but it does happen. I can't say whether this is true or not for both cases of mammary cancer I've had in my own dogs didn't develop until the bitches were well over 6 years old, but they both had obvious swelling after their seasons.

When you think that a pregnancy lasts for 9 weeks, then 2 months of swelling isn't abnormal because the bitch would be feeding pups for at least another month after the 9 week pregnancy is finished, usually. It should disappear once her hormones have settled down again, but do keep an eye out for any lumps which don't disappear completely, as they may be problematic and need checking out.

 

The more overweight a bitch is the more her mammary glands will swell, and in fat or older bitches, even those which haven't been bred from , it is not unusual to find that fat settles in that area.

Would you say spaying the bitch would help stop mammary tumors in the future?

I know they predominantly occur in later years aswell as mastitis.

If the lumps remain then what course of action will the vet suggest? Thanks for the reply

Great advice from Skycat!! it's a young bitches body adapting to hormones etc...

 

 

yes, spaying a bitch will reduce the risk of mammary cancer and pyometra (Obviously) in dogs by a huge amount. Spaying does not affect working ability, but, it all depends if you want to breed her in the future... :victory:

Well so far so good so i was planning on having a litter off her before she retires but its not the end if the world if not, i would rather her be healthy than not be.

Ive heard mixed opinions on working ability thats what makes me sceptical.

Atb

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My bitch has them she is 14 and was spayed a month ago for the fear of pyometra she now has large hard cancerous lumps that will not go but she is to old to operate on as they would remove the mammary tissue in two ops, in my bitch it got worse with each season and she had an infection resulting in nearly loosing her, you will need to spay her midway between seasons as this is when her hormones will be at a flat level, if it reoccurs I would look to spay her or have your litter then spay. One thing I do know is it doesn't get better with time each time my butch came in it got worse.

Good luck with the bitch ! Atb goose

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