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camogirl93

best boar dogs?

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i think alano espanol n working presa canario and dogo are the best holding dogs iv used both with much success, iv used bull grey hounds but they do get smashed up but are fast dogs. but theres no one answer.

 

 

swatt dogs.....do you own an alano? or alano x ? if so did you get it from hunter kenells?

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black mouth curs or catahoulas

 

If you're in the States you won't find a better strike dog than a blackmouth cur from hog dog lines.

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A mate of mine is in the process of importing a few of those. They look like a well put together dog.

Cheers.

 

PS Machine, I think I know a couple of the blokes you've alluded to in the US catching pigs for a living. One bloke in particular is looking at geting a couple of pups from me. Small world...

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A mate of mine is in the process of importing a few of those. They look like a well put together dog.

Cheers.

 

PS Machine, I think I know a couple of the blokes you've alluded to in the US catching pigs for a living. One bloke in particular is looking at geting a couple of pups from me. Small world...

 

Ned what are the finding and stopping capability's of your dogs? Do they prefer to wind or ground scent? Do they have a good back end bite to pull pigs up or do they just go straight for the head?

The only reason I ask the questions Is I've noticed from u tube and talking to guys a lot of the outback pigs tend to turn and fight rather that run until they have been pulled up hard by a bight to the arse?

And often the pigs are spotted then the dogs are let go or a close find from the back of the truck/bike.

 

You guys over there use very different dogs to what we use here, and the guys in the states are different too so Im not trying to cause offense or anything I know different dogs work in different places, and well You wouldnt use them if they didnt work would you.

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A mate of mine is in the process of importing a few of those. They look like a well put together dog.

Cheers.

 

PS Machine, I think I know a couple of the blokes you've alluded to in the US catching pigs for a living. One bloke in particular is looking at geting a couple of pups from me. Small world...

 

Ned what are the finding and stopping capability's of your dogs? Do they prefer to wind or ground scent? Do they have a good back end bite to pull pigs up or do they just go straight for the head?

The only reason I ask the questions Is I've noticed from u tube and talking to guys a lot of the outback pigs tend to turn and fight rather that run until they have been pulled up hard by a bight to the arse?

And often the pigs are spotted then the dogs are let go or a close find from the back of the truck/bike.

 

You guys over there use very different dogs to what we use here, and the guys in the states are different too so Im not trying to cause offense or anything I know different dogs work in different places, and well You wouldnt use them if they didnt work would you.

 

Australia is a big place and the videos you see tend to be shot where it is easy to get action shots. In our case we only see about 30 per cent of our pigs. The rest are straight finds either off the truck or on the ground. The dogs either wind or ground scent depending on what's available. If there is wind scent, they go for that first but if they lose that they put their nose on the ground. I don't like my dogs to touch anything other than the ears but a frustrated dog in thick country will nip at the arse end to spin a pig. I m ostly just have one dog loose at a time and it has to find and grab the boar on its own. A real rough boar or a pig in a bad situation will get a bonus dog. All the dogs have to be capable of finding and holding on their own. Whether or not the pigs run or stand is a function of how many hunting dogs they have seen. If they mostly see sheep dogs they will often stand. Same goes for pigs in dingo country. A boar is not in any way intimidated by a dingo so they just stand and bluff. If they are boars that are in country that is regularly hunted with pig dogs, they tend to run from the first sight, smell or sound of the hunter or dogs so the pig dog has to be alert to scent and willing to act on it immediately and with enthusiasm.

The country we hunt ranges from cropping paddocks to thick scrub, blackberries and briars. Most of our country ranges from bumpy to hilly but nothing like the mountain country in NZ.

As for distances of the finds, hard to say but the best straight find (wind coming from feeding pigs known to be coming in from the opposite direction of the apporaching hunter, is about 2kms in bumpy country.)

If I've missed anything let me know and I'll do my best to answer it.

Cheers.

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Yep thats good, my dogs are the same if they dont hold on the head or learn to early on they are gone, but to stop a pig here they really need a good bite on the arse or its just not going to happen as not many of the hogs me and most of the other hunters catch are not out in the open. A good bite to sit it down then to the head to hold where it can control the pig, If my dogs stop a pig on their owen I would rather they bailed until a second dog got their to help them hold, for some reason they have different ideas its really just to stop them getting hurt and a pig getting away. In saying that the pine pigs that get hunted every other day will run no matter what weather dogs are hanging on them or not

Edited by Chriseden

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