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the big chief

How Much Lead

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hi i have recently taken up shooting shotgun and tbh i am shite so could do with some pointers but my main question is how much lead do i give ?????

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There are too many variables to say. Such as distance, speed of clay, angle of clay. the there is the speed of your swing and the speed off your shot.

 

To be honest, its down to practice and feel.

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cheers tf practice it is then any other pointers would be great :thumbs:

have a couple of lessons on the clays gaff it really helped me out I could hit running rabbits but not birds after 2 1 hour lessons I got a lot better I ain't yo samity Sam though lol

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Starters bud put a board up 35 -40yrds away say 3'x3' make it into quarters mount the gun and shoot straight at it with out aiming as such then count the shot in each quarter then repeat with a new board same place same distance this will then tell you if your gun is shooting high low left or right with greater % in which quarter then you can get the gun fitted so you are getting a even shot spread. As you maybe giving correct lead but shooting under or over or behind the clay. But most clays that are crossing are missed behind watch other shooters stand behind to get a rough idea where they are shooting. Pick the clay up as soon as you can try to shoot it mid flight not when it's dropping as you will have to give lead and compensate drop of clay aswell but as a rule as a standard crossing bird have the clay about 4-6”above the barrel of your gun your lead foot facing where you want to shoot the turn your body and gun where the trap is call pull pick the birds up move with it then pull ahead of it by say 2-3' keep moving while pulling the trigger try not rifle shoot it most beginners stop moving when they pull the trigger and miss the clay behind.hope this helps sorry for the long post lol

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Starters bud put a board up 35 -40yrds away say 3'x3' make it into quarters mount the gun and shoot straight at it with out aiming as such then count the shot in each quarter then repeat with a new board same place same distance this will then tell you if your gun is shooting high low left or right with greater % in which quarter then you can get the gun fitted so you are getting a even shot spread. As you maybe giving correct lead but shooting under or over or behind the clay. But most clays that are crossing are missed behind watch other shooters stand behind to get a rough idea where they are shooting. Pick the clay up as soon as you can try to shoot it mid flight not when it's dropping as you will have to give lead and compensate drop of clay aswell but as a rule as a standard crossing bird have the clay about 4-6”above the barrel of your gun your lead foot facing where you want to shoot the turn your body and gun where the trap is call pull pick the birds up move with it then pull ahead of it by say 2-3' keep moving while pulling the trigger try not rifle shoot it most beginners stop moving when they pull the trigger and miss the clay behind.hope this helps sorry for the long post lol

that helps loads pal i do stop when i pull the trigger come to think of it and have been aiming just in front too

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cheers tf practice it is then any other pointers would be great :thumbs:

have a couple of lessons on the clays gaff it really helped me out I could hit running rabbits but not birds after 2 1 hour lessons I got a lot better I ain't yo samity Sam though lol

 

lol my pals been shooting a while so i will get him to give me some pointers lee

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Try another method aswell if you always shoot with gun ready mounted in your sholder I find this method a bit restrictive and personally can't shoot like that. When entering the stand get your self into your desired shooting position and pull your gun up about 3/4 into mounted position call for the birds as the birds comes into your pick up zone move your body with it mount your gun fully pull a head of it keep moving and pull trigger I find this method better as it doesn't restrict your field of view and it gives you a better action when shooting. As if you shoot gun ready mounted the clay could be slightly obscured by your gun then your playing catch up with a lot of barrel swing. If shooting bolting rabbits same rule applies but I always aim for the top of the ears and where there front feet would be in full stride so to speak. In coming birds get under neath them let them come in a fair bit don't mount to early as this can put you off as you've got to much time to track them in just as they are half way keep a foot or so in front move at same speed as clay and pull trigger. Going away birds take as soon as possible keep your head down on stock for theses as it's easy to shoot over the top of them keep gun under them by a few inches chase them up on there flight path and when pulling trigger move gun up through the path of the clay don't do this to early as you will shoot over top but don't leave to late as they will be dropping like a stone. ATB WILLUM

 

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Get a proper one on one lesson. I could spend hours giving tips on line, but without seeing you shoot a number of targets I would be pissing in the wind

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Are you going to be shooting live game gaffer at some point

Edited by budharley

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