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quakshot

Refinishing stock and fore end

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Hi, I very recently purchased a gun off another member on here, it's a lovely little gun that I got at a bargain price. I originally bought it as it was cheap just to fix up and put in he cabinet as a spare, but after handling it I actually quite like it more than I thought I would, and I'm actually considering using this as my main gun for shoot days. It's not in bad condition at all, but if I was going to take it on shoot days I would like to tidy it up. The stock and fore end are in very good condition with no dents or scratches but the finish has faded, I've read that it is better to use a solvent to remove the rest of the original finish.

Does any body know what product is best to use on this? And also what is best to refinish the wood work?

I really would like to get this gun as nice as possible, but by doing it myself as a hobby. Any advice on this would be much appreciated, thanks

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sand it with all the grits of paper till you gett all the marks out from the previouse sand paper till there isn't one scratch on the wood buy some tru oil and fine wire put a couple of coats of tru oil on let it dry then take the wire wool and rub the stock and it should go dull give it a good wipe with a cloth then ad thin coats of tru oil again till you get what you are looking for this knife was done in that way

 

017-2.jpg

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That's the way I would do it also work through the grits to remove old finish

 

Then use tru oil couple of coats then cut back with finest wire wool then reapply building up to the required finish using thin coats

 

This is done with tru oil

452d4475.jpg

 

Atb rob

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Thanks guys, what's best to apply the tru oil to the wood? Also how do I remove the lacquer from the engraved area on the grip and fore end as surely I wouldn't want to flatten that area?

 

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I would use nitromors stripper and an old toothbrush to remove the lacquer, ( keep the nitromors wet, don't let it dry, this may need several coats ) from the engraved area then neutralise it by washing in clean water. As for applying the tru oil I just put a drop on my fingers and rub it in the stock, your body heat will help with the flow of the oil.

Atb

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Ok I'll try that with the nitromors as well then. I'm looking forward to starting this now, can't wait.

IT MAY TARNISH THE WOOD AND BLEACH IT A DIFFERENT COLOUR

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Ok I'll try that with the nitromors as well then. I'm looking forward to starting this now, can't wait.

IT MAY TARNISH THE WOOD AND BLEACH IT A DIFFERENT COLOUR

 

Oh really? The last thing I want is to ruine it! How else could I get into the engraved areas?

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id use a thinner for wood to remove the laquer and look into what sort of wood you have , do a test area were you can quicky apply and remove somewere were you can fix easy

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I have been trying to find what type of wood it is but with no luck, it's a E.Rizzini sporter, o/u side plate model if anybody knows? Would acetone work of would it be too aggressive?

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I have been trying to find what type of wood it is but with no luck, it's a E.Rizzini sporter, o/u side plate model if anybody knows? Would acetone work of would it be too aggressive?

put a pic up mate im sure then you will be answered to what the wood is

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There is a nitromors craftsman that is supposed to be good for delicate work like this. Haven't used it myself but it may be worth checking it out.

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I have been trying to find what type of wood it is but with no luck, it's a E.Rizzini sporter, o/u side plate model if anybody knows? Would acetone work of would it be too aggressive?

put a pic up mate im sure then you will be answered to what the wood is

 

This is the picture that was used when it was for sale, any help would be appreciated. Thanks

post-80987-0-87525000-1357308599.jpg

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There is a nitromors craftsman that is supposed to be good for delicate work like this. Haven't used it myself but it may be worth checking it out.

 

I tried nitromors on an old air rifle stock and was pleased with the results, but as I was told earlier on in this thread you do have to keep the nitromors wet, but it works!

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