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recluse

Best Twine?

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Hello All, I am interested in constructing a long net and have been doing some research. I have seen reference to 20/12 spun polyester multiple times; particularly that of engel sold by fourteenacre. My problem is I am in the U.S. I cannot seem to find a supplier of this sort of twine on this side of the ocean and was wondering if anyone knew of a supplier or knew of an acceptable alternative to the 20/12 poly that was common in my country. I can get my hands on any description of twisted(spun?) nylon of various weights and colors.

 

I was considering this product

http://www.memphisnet.net/product/2220/twine-green-seine

 

#9 seine twine is .042" (or 1.07mm) diameter. Does this sound about right or is it too thick?

 

I have used #12 seine twine which is .047" (or 1.20 mm) to make purse nets with good results.

 

Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Be Well,

Recluse

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i am sure someone on here will advise you, but tell me , what are you going to use it for ? i note that you have made purse nets , do Americans go ferreting ? put some pictures up mate i would love to see how they go about it the other side of the pond .

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Oh, I just like making nets :whistling:

 

Where legal here it is done much like you all do, although rabbits here only take to holes occasionally in harsh weather during the winter months. It would be quite nice if they burrowed year 'round like you all's variety!

 

I think most people who work ferrets in this country use them on rats and other unrestricted "pests"

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thanks mate ...keep us informed and if you need to know anything there are plenty of people on who can help you.

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Contact Fitec International if there still in the buissnes they make spun poly and spun nylon twine. Spun Grip which is spun nylon you can get from brunson nets , or straight from Brownells who maufacture lots of different twines over in the States ..

Regards.

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Thanks! They have spun nylon on thier site but the smallest diamter is .051", does that sound about right?. The spun polyester option is not accessible so not sure if they are still making it?

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.051 is approx 1.3mm which to my mind is a bit heavy for long nets. But I do like fine long nets. 4z 210/12 is only .7 of a mm in diameter, that said spun nylon is always a larger diameter for braking strain than nylon with a twist.

 

TC

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Thanks! They have spun nylon on thier site but the smallest diamter is .051", does that sound about right?. The spun polyester option is not accessible so not sure if they are still making it?

10/6 spun nylon is about the same size of 4/5z nylon, 0.8mm ,

I'm knitting at present with 10/9 spun and it does make a decent net,,

Regards.

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netsandmore.com are in the states and have 10/9 spun nylon.

Look at Lee Fisher Marine also , they also do spun twines of the best Toray nylon .

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.051 is approx 1.3mm which to my mind is a bit heavy for long nets. But I do like fine long nets. 4z 210/12 is only .7 of a mm in diameter, that said spun nylon is always a larger diameter for braking strain than nylon with a twist.

 

TC

Ok I looked through some of my cordage stash and found a spool of military grade poly thread by eddington, I googled them and found they have a website.

 

.7 mm = .027"

 

They make an 8S poly thread .028" (.71mm) that has a 73 lb break strength. That seems like it may work? They also have an .033" (.83 mm) running at a 98 lb break strength.

 

Your thoughts?

 

Thanks for all the helpful responses gents.

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When you talk about minimal differences like .10 of a mm it is neither here nor there. The difference between .8 and .7 is so minimal in the overall scheme it is not worth talking about. What does bare talking about is how the twine reacts to knotting Basically you really need an inert twine to knit with.

 

This is where a good spool of spun polyester scores over twisted nylon every time. The Z twist and the S twist impart a memory in a spool of twine and if the spool is not de-spooled correctly it can and does cause all sets of problems to the knitter. The quality spun nylons and polyesters do not have the twisting problems, that said, some of the cheaper end spun polyesters and spun nylon can and do sometimes have this problem.

 

TC

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When you talk about minimal differences like .10 of a mm it is neither here nor there. The difference between .8 and .7 is so minimal in the overall scheme it is not worth talking about. What does bare talking about is how the twine reacts to knotting Basically you really need an inert twine to knit with.

 

This is where a good spool of spun polyester scores over twisted nylon every time. The Z twist and the S twist impart a memory in a spool of twine and if the spool is not de-spooled correctly it can and does cause all sets of problems to the knitter. The quality spun nylons and polyesters do not have the twisting problems, that said, some of the cheaper end spun polyesters and spun nylon can and do sometimes have this problem.

 

TC

Thanks!. So does S or Z matter? Or is what is referred to as "spun" poly a completely different animal altogether? Just when I thought I had it sorted I'm more confused than ever HA!

 

Looks like I need to do some more research

 

This is the thread I was looking at http://eddingtonthread.com/polyester.html

Edited by recluse

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