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Anyone else got Bats on their property, and do they cause any problems ?

I know they are protected, don't want to move them, just curious about any damage they may cause.

 

Got these pics last August at 1:15pm, its the only time I've seen them out in the daytime.

(sorry about the picture quality)

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Guest Duzabit

Take it as a privilige, they won't do no harm. they are protected

and it is illegal to disturb them even in your own property.

 

Not being cheeky, but are you sure you aint got mice' check the

droppings, bat droppings tend to be in one place where they roost

where as mice droppings are every where.

 

Bat droppings will crumble easily as they feed solely on insects while mice

droppings will be hard. Bit of a specialist subject for me.

 

Cheers

Duz... :D

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Thanks for the info lads.

It took 8 years to find where they hang out. Only seen them disappear under the eves a couple of times. There's about 4-6 every evening at any one time. (difficult to count, as they won't keep still)

Apart from seeing them flying around outside you wouldn't know they lived above the bedroom.

Got no rats, very few mice, but plagued by voles. :realmad:

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Thanks for the info lads.

It took 8 years to find where they hang out. Only seen them disappear under the eves a couple of times. There's about 4-6 every evening at any one time. (difficult to count, as they won't keep still)

Apart from seeing them flying around outside you wouldn't know they lived above the bedroom.

Got no rats, very few mice, but plagued by voles. :realmad:

 

The only harm youcan run into is from the guano, (their droppings), it is known to carry toxsoplasmosis, which can cause a respretory disiese. Over here it is very expensive to have cleaned up as it is classed as a hazzardous material. If you clean it up yourself besure to wear gloves and a filter mask. best method is to use a shop vac and vaccume the droppings up.

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Borderterrier bats and there roost are protected 12 months of the year , they don't do any damage to the property not like mice chewing things

 

what time of night do they come out ? pips will come out when its still quite light where some of the bigger bats wait untill just about dark

 

have a look at www.bats.org.uk

 

 

Hybred

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They're out at about 8.30pm at moment, still quite light really.

 

They never seem to venture out if its raining.

 

I'll check out that website Hybred. :good:

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If they are coming out at 8.30 they must be pips

 

Bats and rabies

Do bats carry rabies?

Do bats in the UK carry rabies?

Can people catch the disease from bats?

What should I do if I am bitten by a bat?

Can I kill the bat if it bites me?

What is the future for bats in Britain?

 

 

Do bats carry rabies?

Some bats in Europe do carry a rabies virus called European Bat Lyssavirus (EBLV). This is different from classical rabies, which has never been found in a bat in Europe. There are two strains: EBLV1 and EBLV2.

 

Do bats in the UK carry rabies?

In the UK 4 bats have been found with EBLV2 - one in Sussex in 1996, two in Lancashire (one in 2002 and one in 2003) and one in Surrey in 2004. All were Daubenton's bats.

 

In 2005 a serotine bat found in the south of England tested positive for EBLV1.

 

The Veterinary Laboratories Agency, a government laboratory, has tested up to 4,000 UK bats since 1986 and no other infected bat has been found. These bats had been sent in by members of the public and bat workers after the bats had died of natural causes.

 

Further research by the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), the Scottish Executive and Scottish Natural Heritage is ongoing. Details can be obtained from the Bat Helpline (0845 1300 228).

 

The discovery of EBLV in bats in the UK does not affect the UK's rabies free status.

 

Can people catch the disease from bats?

The risk of catching the virus from a bat is extremely low, for several reasons:

 

Passive surveillance of bats for rabies in the UK since 1986 has found only four cases.

Human contact with bats is very rare, even when they share the same buildings.

EBLV is transmitted by the bite of an infectious bat or by its saliva entering a wound or mucous membrane. There is therefore no risk to people if they do not approach or handle a bat.

Bats are not aggressive, although like any wild animal, they may bite to defend themselves if handled. A bat that appears to be baring its teeth is actually 'scanning' you with its unique method of echolocation - building up a picture of its environment by using a type of sonar, which is mostly inaudible to humans.

There is an effective treatment available from your GP for those exposed to EBLV; this must be administered as soon as possible after exposure. However the BCT takes a precautionary approach, and so advises that anyone who is bitten by a bat visits their GP for medical advice.

Click here to read the Scottish Natural Heritage's 'Bats & Human Health' pdf document.

 

What should I do if I am bitten by a bat?

The Bat Conservation Trust believes the chances of catching rabies from any wild animal are increased if no action is taken should you be bitten or scratched. We therefore advise people to always follow this advice:

 

Wash the wound immediately with soap and water for at least five minutes. Additional cleansing of the wound site with an alcohol base or other disinfectant is also recommended.

Seek immediate medical advice from your GP; you can also call the NHS Direct Helpline on 0845 4647.

Contain the bat so that it may be collected and assessed by a bat worker. Bats can squeeze through very small spaces, so keep it in a well-sealed container with adequate ventilation holes, a piece of cloth to hide in, and a shallow container of water for the bat to drink from. Make sure you avoid getting bitten again by wearing gloves or using a cloth to handle the bat.

Contact the Bat Helpline on 0845 1300 228 so that we can arrange for the nearest bat worker to collect and identify the bat. If there is no bat worker in your area the bat may need to be taken to a local vet for assistance.

Bat handlers should click here for FAQ on rabies vaccinations

Bat workers and animal rescue staff trained to handle bats for conservation and welfare purposes should:

 

Ensure they have up-to-date rabies vaccination protection (GPs can obtain more information on the vaccines from the Health Protection Agency, tel 020 8200 6868).

Always wear protective gloves when handling bats

Follow the advice above if bitten

Can I kill the bat if it bites me?

No. Contain the bat if possible and contact BCT, 0845 1300 228, for advice on what to do with it. Killing the bat could reduce the chances of testing it properly for infection. Your bat worker or vet will be able to assess the bat.

 

 

What is the future for bats in Britain ?

Good - thanks to your support.

The Bat Conservation Trust has more than 4,200 supporters, many of whom work hard to monitor bats and help conserve them. We always welcome new members and run regular training courses for bat workers and surveyors.

 

Bats and their roosts are protected by the law and the Bat Conservation Trust works with householders, builders, farmers and foresters to protect and enhance bat populations.

 

It is not unusual for people to be afraid of bats until they have met one in person. Bat workers give hundreds of presentations each year to schools and community groups and often take along bats that cannot be returned to the wild, for people to meet. Contact your local bat group if you would like to find out more about bats.

 

Details of your local bat group are available from the Bat Conservation Trust during office hours on 0845 1300 228.

 

 

Im also a bat worker

 

hope this helps

 

Hybred

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Cheers Hybred

:good::good::good:

 

I'm more worried about catching something off the sheep in the field to the side. :sick: :sick:

 

Not the best looked after animals.(They aren't mine)

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