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Been round lot of dog lads over 30 years of keeping working lurchers some IV learned from what to do others IV defiantly learned from what not to do.

What I'd like to now is people's thoughts on heavy handed owners have you come across lads that scream and shout or drag them about buy the scraf or collar or Evan beet them kick them for no good reason because lack of owners paishions .I now that sort of thing makes my blood boil and has coursed a few falling out.the same lads stick to this way of so called training dog after dog with the same results well bred dogs not working for them. Are they jest brakeing the dogs will and confidence that back they jest won't work well

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Great replies ladsūüĎŹ I USED to be, real heavy handed with my lurchers,...I learned this from my Father and his old man... They both took in, cur dogs for training, to work the sheep and cattl

I took on a 15 month rescue working type Collie Bitch. I could see great potential in her but she was crapping in the house every night and when I came in the room it was painful to see her trying to

The skill is in assessing the temperament of the dog you have in front of you. Different treatment for different dogs. Too hard and you can ruin a soft dog. Too soft with a hard dog and you have a lia

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My training experience with dogs comes from owning spaniels, cockers at that. Stubborn little things! Always been told and shown that when training them if they get it wrong or don't listen then you "get on them" not in a nasty way, not kicking or hitting, but for example if the dog misses the stop whistle you get to the dog, drag it back by either scruff or under the neck to where you blew whistle and blow the whistle again so it understands. I'm no expert but for me and the dogs I've owned this works. I had a young dog pup who was softer than most and he would drop if you got onto him but never affected his confidence and he was a joy to train, picked up the lessons quicker than any other I've had, sadly things didn't work out for home life and we had to move him on. 

I've now got my first ever lurcher and used this tried and tested method with her and it did not go well. Her recall was good, and her command listening was gold but it shattered her confidence. She's now 18 months old and failed to catch in her first season with a lack of commitment, her recall goes out the window when working. I've now spent the time since realising this (with massive help and guidance I should add) doing no training but just trying to have fun with her in the hope of building her mentally to a point where she knows how good she is. Her first heat saw a mental change in her and I've got everything crossed that the next working season will see her come out of her shell. In this instance it's my belief that the dog is not at fault its purely the owner! And correction is the hardest thing to train. 

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23 minutes ago, scottpenn28 said:

My training experience with dogs comes from owning spaniels, cockers at that. Stubborn little things! Always been told and shown that when training them if they get it wrong or don't listen then you "get on them" not in a nasty way, not kicking or hitting, but for example if the dog misses the stop whistle you get to the dog, drag it back by either scruff or under the neck to where you blew whistle and blow the whistle again so it understands. I'm no expert but for me and the dogs I've owned this works. I had a young dog pup who was softer than most and he would drop if you got onto him but never affected his confidence and he was a joy to train, picked up the lessons quicker than any other I've had, sadly things didn't work out for home life and we had to move him on. 

I've now got my first ever lurcher and used this tried and tested method with her and it did not go well. Her recall was good, and her command listening was gold but it shattered her confidence. She's now 18 months old and failed to catch in her first season with a lack of commitment, her recall goes out the window when working. I've now spent the time since realising this (with massive help and guidance I should add) doing no training but just trying to have fun with her in the hope of building her mentally to a point where she knows how good she is. Her first heat saw a mental change in her and I've got everything crossed that the next working season will see her come out of her shell. In this instance it's my belief that the dog is not at fault its purely the owner! And correction is the hardest thing to train. 

Thanks for that mate out of interest what cross is your lurcher?

Hope it come right for you and well done for sticking with it to many would of jest got rid with out trying

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There are two times I might give my dogs a bit of a slap. That’s when they’re younger and eyeing up stock(let’s face it all the stock training in the world won’t stop a young lurcher looking at a mountain ewe running up a hill) or if they run out on the road from my driveway before I let them do it on command. But normally when they reach 2 they have both down to a tee. 
Otherwise, hitting a dog is a very bad idea. Break a bond and recall can become an issue. I cringe when I see the odd person kick/slap/scruff their dogs. I don’t really hang out with those type of people. 

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I'm no expert but we have just taken in a young dog (18 months old) which had been handled this heavy handed way.  Well bred beautiful coursing type dog with a lovely nature and plenty of prey drive as it turns out but when we first got her she was so frightened of doing wrong that when you asked her to do something she just dithered and wouldn't even think of striking a rabbit right in front of her.  I think she'd been beaten on the recall so she used to cower 10 yards off which was really unhelpful.  Any sudden movement sent her running and screaming.  She was also underweight and horribly tight through her back end with one collapsed toe.  So i'm guessing she'd done a fair bit of work at a young age. 

Her back end has now relaxed, which means she can now really move.  It's been quite confusing trying to figure out the good from the bad because alot of the training she'd obviously had before she came to us has been useful, i.e. she's been broken to stock and walks nicely on the lead.  She is coming out of herself and is getting better at interacting with us but if she feels under the slightest pressure she defaults to shutting down and slinking away.

So my answer to your question would be that physically abusing a dog is counter productive when you want it to work for you.  Our other dogs do their utmost to do what we want and take real pride in doing what they do best.

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It's is hard work but some dogs just can't bend the knee and some can this upside-down don't know why this happens lol I trained these two we dogs like gun dogs and they loved to do anything for you but all didn't work out in the end 

20210124_122226.jpg

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17 minutes ago, D Lloyd said:

Thanks for that mate out of interest what cross is your lurcher?

Hope it come right for you and well done for sticking with it to many would of jest got rid with out trying

Shes mainly saluki x grey but I believe there is a bit of bull, whippet and deerhound way back in her. 

Too many dogs get passed around without any attempt to correct, I firmly believe this pup had everything needed to succeed and hasn't because of me so to give up on her would be wrong. I've made the mistakes so if she doesn't make the grade she will plod around with me and the family until the end of her time, hopefully just enjoying herself. 

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12 minutes ago, Ferretman65 said:

It's is hard work but some dogs just can't bend the knee and some can this upside-down don't know why this happens lol I trained these two we dogs like gun dogs and they loved to do anything for you but all didn't work out in the end 

20210124_122226.jpg

Are you on AustraliaūüėÜ

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Have to agree with Wideboy, stock breaking and stopping a dog running into danger (like a road) both require something a bit more extreme (an absolute 'no') but if you have the bond established, they have a better reaction to your displeasure/command.  I learnt alot from a dog we had who was 100% the pack leader but also a really nice chap.  Watching him discipline a pup (and still have a bond with them, play with them, sleep with them etc) taught me what they understand and accept as a 'no' without being broken mentally by the experience.

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I’m pretty soft with mine usually a raised voice and a good stare at them will get most dogs to stop what there doing , when it comes to stock I can be heavy handed because it’s a big thing in the armoury , my current lurcher has never looked at sheep so never needed that heavy hand 

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A bit heavy handed in the past  it was the way it was  but gently,  gently  now. To a degree it depends on the dog but as Phil said, train don't break.

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