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Stockbreaking Advice


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Gonna try steal a few of these ideas and see if its not too late for me..  I tried for months to stock break the pup but we got nowhere.. feel like I've failed her a bit in certain areas and this is definitely one. My fault for starting it too late I reckon.

Now shes almost 1, she won't pull towards them anymore, but she still looks at sheep like a large wooly breakfast. 

She respects cows and horses mind, probably because of the size. 

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I must have been lucky over the years that Ive never had a problem with stockbreaking with any of mine from terriers/Lurchers/spaniels/pitbulls and bandogs.I do start stockbreaking at 8weeks and keep on them everyday if possible untill I know they're bombproof.Saying that I introduced my present bandog to chickens at my pals a few months ago and a stearn "you F**king leave em" was enough that within 10minutes she was mooching round his paddock with chickens pecking round her whilst we were building his new stables.She goes out hacking a few days a week after meeting horses for the first time at 4years old and can be trusted 100% with any animal that gets brought to the home.

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Timing is the crucial factor, as it is in a lot of situations, you’ll need to get your eye in and stay focused on the dog, gradually walk him closer to the Sheep each time you pass them, keep him on a loose leash and as you pass them if he turns his head in the slightest direction towards the Sheep correct him by pulling the lead sharply to the side which will hopefully unbalance him temporarily while issuing your command “NO”, that’s the timing I mentioned, it will take more effort with an older dog but you will reap the rewards for the effort you put in now, I once broke a mates dog to sheep, the dog was 11 months old and tested my patience Several times, he became good round Sheep after about 4 months, a few times towards the end instead of me giving a sharp tug on the lead I grabbed him by the scruff of his neck with one hand and used my other hand to pull his front legs away to the side, his body hit the ground before he realised what was happening and I then I pinned him to the ground with one hand with light pressure only, he surrendered straight away and only got up when I gave him the command to get up, after half a dozen times of repeating that he finally grasped what I wanted and started to behave like he was expected to behave, it was stressful I’m not gonna lie, atb

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On 28/07/2021 at 10:46, downsouth said:

I must have been lucky over the years that Ive never had a problem with stockbreaking with any of mine from terriers/Lurchers/spaniels/pitbulls and bandogs.I do start stockbreaking at 8weeks and keep on them everyday if possible untill I know they're bombproof.Saying that I introduced my present bandog to chickens at my pals a few months ago and a stearn "you F**king leave em" was enough that within 10minutes she was mooching round his paddock with chickens pecking round her whilst we were building his new stables.She goes out hacking a few days a week after meeting horses for the first time at 4years old and can be trusted 100% with any animal that gets brought to the home.

Good advice fellah👏

I always get young lurcher out and about,.. as soon as possible...

Once the dog hits puberty and the real prey drive kicks in, it can sometimes be an emotional old carry on❗

Some dogs are just born sensible and laid back, whilst others cannot differentiate, twixt what is a legitimate quarry, and what is none of their business.

Most problems can be cured with various devious, ways and means, ..but it makes for an easier life if you can keep everything, real chilled....

I've walked out with a lot of fellow enthusiasts, and to be honest, some of them, give off an energy that is purpose-made, to excite any sparky jukel 🙄 

I think most of us have owned a hyped up canine, and I must confess that such animals are invariably quick off the mark, and are onto their quarry, in seconds.

This super prey drive is what we want from our lurchers I suppose,..but personally,..(having owned, several different 'types'....) I much prefer the quiet life...😉

Enjoy your dogs Brothers, and stay safe, kind regards, OldPhil.🙏

 

 

Edited by OldPhil
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49 minutes ago, OldPhil said:

Good advice fellah👏

I always get young lurcher out and about,.. as soon as possible...

Once the dog hits puberty and the real prey drive kicks in, it can sometimes be an emotional old carry on❗

Some dogs are just born sensible and laid back, whilst others cannot differentiate, twixt what is a legitimate quarry, and what is none of their business.

Most problems can be cured with various devious, ways and means, ..but it makes for an easier life if you can keep everything, real chilled....

I've walked out with a lot of fellow enthusiasts, and to be honest, some of them, give off an energy that is purpose-made, to excite any sparky jukel 🙄 

I think most of us have owned a hyped up canine, and I must confess that such animals are invariably quick off the mark, and are onto their quarry, in seconds.

This super prey drive is what we want from our lurchers I suppose,..but personally,..(having owned, several different 'types'....) I much prefer the quiet life...😉

Enjoy your dogs Brothers, and stay safe, kind regards, OldPhil.🙏

 

Honey February 2006 12 weeks 005_edited-2.tif.jpg

Exactly.I think too many lads dont think about it untill their youngsters start showing an unhealthy interest.I think you're bang on about giving off energies too,I think my laid back,dont give a f**k energy must rub off on my dogs.

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I was trying to stock break a coursing bullx years ago an it kept mounting the tup trying to hump it, the mad tup didn’t know what to do an he was a bold ole sheep😂😂best part about it was the cunting dog was a bitch, me an farmer couldn’t stop laughing 😂 he 

Edited by W. Katchum
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I was lucky with my older lurcher and busher. Couple of times on a long lead and they were done. This young bitch I have was testing me at one point. Thought I had it nailed but at about 9 months she started chasing again. Long lead, off lead walking through them daily. I like my Lurchers to range on the hill so stock breaking is a must. At some point I had to trust her as I don’t want to be calling them back all the time. I think the penny really drops with them once they know that there’s other stuff out there for them to chase other than the sheep. Keep going with it. Keep calm and I’m sure you will get there 👍

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Some sound advice here! Will probably try a mix of things with the harder side coming in if it doesnt improve. Had I had him from a pup I could have not encountered the issue but having him at such a headstrong age with super drive means Ill need to rectify a problem. Lets hope these techniques work

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