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Birds "please Add Yours"

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                                                                                                                          Red Grouse

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IMG_20190315_174025.jpg.960d982c8c54d4699d85e3d8b7a6a432.jpgTook this today with new/old camera quite pleased with it. Also found some gold crests anyone know if they can be tempted down with meal worms ?

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Anyone shed any light on this..

Looking at some amazing bird photographs, came across a barn owl shot taken in flight with the following settings f9 iso 2200 shutter speed 1250 the result is a mint photo taken in march at dusk. If I applied the same settings I'm pretty sure the result would be a very dark under exposed photo or am I missing something.

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3 hours ago, Chaff said:

Anyone shed any light on this..

Looking at some amazing bird photographs, came across a barn owl shot taken in flight with the following settings f9 iso 2200 shutter speed 1250 the result is a mint photo taken in march at dusk. If I applied the same settings I'm pretty sure the result would be a very dark under exposed photo or am I missing something.

All settings change with different light conditions, also most DSLR’s have an exposure compensation button/setting so you can over or under expose as you feel...

Normally if you were to shoot birds in flight, you would over expose as the camera would meter for the sky and not the bird as the sky is brighter and bigger than the subject resulting in a silhouette of a bird or very underexposed without any details...

Understanding settings, exposure and use of light can create some amazing and creative images and will open up a whole new world of what can be achieved.

Have a google of backlit or sillouhette photography techniques or tutorials.

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2 hours ago, zandy01 said:

All settings change with different light conditions, also most DSLR’s have an exposure compensation button/setting so you can over or under expose as you feel...

Normally if you were to shoot birds in flight, you would over expose as the camera would meter for the sky and not the bird as the sky is brighter and bigger than the subject resulting in a silhouette of a bird or very underexposed without any details...

Understanding settings, exposure and use of light can create some amazing and creative images and will open up a whole new world of what can be achieved.

Have a google of backlit or sillouhette photography techniques or tutorials.

So if I'm shooting in manual mode, I am constantly changing shutter speeds to level out the WB metre that appears when INFO button is pressed. I'm judging the ISO setting by using the HISTOGRAM 

Does that make sense ?

The above method has got few nice photos today for me.

Other than cropping I have yet to play about with a light room, can you change the exposure with that kind of software?IMG_20190317_165014.jpg.d03272759f9e15b2b6f7ac61732aa764.jpg

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13 hours ago, Chaff said:

So if I'm shooting in manual mode, I am constantly changing shutter speeds to level out the WB metre that appears when INFO button is pressed. I'm judging the ISO setting by using the HISTOGRAM 

Does that make sense ?

The above method has got few nice photos today for me.

Other than cropping I have yet to play about with a light room, can you change the exposure with that kind of software?IMG_20190317_165014.jpg.d03272759f9e15b2b6f7ac61732aa764.jpg

Manual is a totally different ballgame - you set and change your exposure in manual by either changing aperture, shutter speed or ISO...

Personally I only use manual for more static subjects and if I want to be creative, 99% of the time I shoot in aperture priority, I set the ISO myself and f stop, if I feel the shutter speed is too slow then I up the ISO..

If you’re shooting in Manual then start off with lowest ISO possible dependant on light, f 7.1 is good for all round sharpness and shutter speed depends on subject but about 1/500th should be minimum really if handheld...

ISO is how sensitive your camera is to light, the higher the ISO the faster the shutter speed will be, the lower the f number, the more you’re opening your lens up, letting even more light into camera giving you even faster shutter speed and obviously the slower the shutter speed the longer your allowing light in - it’s all about balance...

If for example you take an image at f5.6, ISO 800 and shutter of 1/1000th and it’s under exposed but you want to keep f5.6 you can either up the ISO a little and keep the 1/1000th shutter speed or slow the shutter speed down to say 1/800th and keep the ISO the same.

Have a try using aperture priority, set your f number, set your ISO and let the camera control shutter speed, if speed is too slow then up the ISO - see if it makes any difference to your keeper rate. Not many people I know use manual when shooting wildlife as sometimes you just don’t have time to mess on with settings.

You can still get creative in aperture priority mode by using the exposure compensation + or - and as for lightroom, it’s great for tweaking highlights, shadows and reducing noise, it’s limited to how much you can change exposure, best practice is to get everything right in the camera.

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Thanks for taking the time to reply in such depth Andy👍

Thanks to you and YouTube I now have a reasonable understanding of juggling light for most situations.

I spoke to a pro photographer who mainly shoots weddings, portraits and a bit of street photography, he said that aperture priority tends to change settings between shots and recommended using full manual?

So I gave it a try and if nothing else has given me a better understanding of the 3 settings.

I will get back to aperture priority now and just change ISO and see what happens, the problem I was getting with that was really low shutter speeds too low for handheld with a 600mm and battery pack.

Would I be right in thinking when shooting a bird in flight and using aperture priority I should be changing ISO until I get a shutter speed of 1/1000 or above, along with a couple of notches either way on exposure compensation depending on background.

I'm keen to nail the bird in flight as I have a mate with a hawk, and I think this weekend will be his last outing before going into molt.

Cheers in advance

 

 

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1 hour ago, Chaff said:

Thanks for taking the time to reply in such depth Andy👍

Thanks to you and YouTube I now have a reasonable understanding of juggling light for most situations.

I spoke to a pro photographer who mainly shoots weddings, portraits and a bit of street photography, he said that aperture priority tends to change settings between shots and recommended using full manual?

So I gave it a try and if nothing else has given me a better understanding of the 3 settings.

I will get back to aperture priority now and just change ISO and see what happens, the problem I was getting with that was really low shutter speeds too low for handheld with a 600mm and battery pack.

Would I be right in thinking when shooting a bird in flight and using aperture priority I should be changing ISO until I get a shutter speed of 1/1000 or above, along with a couple of notches either way on exposure compensation depending on background.

I'm keen to nail the bird in flight as I have a mate with a hawk, and I think this weekend will be his last outing before going into molt.

Cheers in advance

 

 

Yes, adjust the ISO until you get a shutter speed fast enough to freeze the motion of bird in flight, if exposing against a sky then you’ll have to over compensate on the exposure...

 

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15 minutes ago, zandy01 said:

Yes, adjust the ISO until you get a shutter speed fast enough to freeze the motion of bird in flight, if exposing against a sky then you’ll have to over compensate on the exposure...

 

Have just read that changing the exposure levels also changes shutter speed, so another setting to add to the mix lol

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