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Your Ideal Pack???

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Far from Ideal because there's always room for improvement but here's some of my lot and a good friends lurcher

 

20140216_125732_zpsc5cf90d0.jpg

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What I got now

 

http://youtu.be/gClRl9SZA-0

 

Until this one joins the pack

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Iv'e said it before and i'll say it again R M that's a cracking terrier that you have there, got a new one as well and so far so good, atb daywalker

 

Thanks mate I made my mind up to keep 2 pups back in the end from my litter of 4 out of my Russell the ones in the middle

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You bred from copper then, i remember you saying a while back that you were thinking about it, what did you put her too. By the way the dog i have at the moment is marked just like the brownish pup in your pic she is about eight months i think, well she was born end of august last year and she had her first rabbit yesterday evening, only a half grown one but its a start, if i can get her recall sorted i'll be laughing. atb daywalker.

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In a perfect world I'd quite fancy a brace of springerxfells and a brace of lurchers. Maybe with a steady little bayer to run with the bushers or be kept back for bolting to the gun.

 

But that's an ideal world. For the time being I'll just keep on with my lurcher and terrier team.

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rabbiting man thats my type of terrier a fast and at em type looks effortless working that cover at a good pace,my mate has 2 parsons and i asked him to work this bramble bank for me its only small but his dogs put 2 bunnies out and my lurcher took both infront of the land owner and they worked just like your dog :thumbs:

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as for numbers, at least six.

 

keep the dogs you need rather than the dogs you want.

 

back in the day a pack made up of terrier, hound, running dogs, covered all corners regards fox, rabbit packs are different to fox packs, drummer packs don't need earth dogs and not everyone wants hounds on rabbit.

 

if you live in a area of hard tough cover, you cant expect just one bushing dog to do all the work, so in my pack 3-4 dogs would be finders. and two running dogs. i also expect the runners to hunt.

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the hunting and terrain is alot different over here, dogs need to be educated not to chase kangaroos or go down wombat holes. where i mostly hunt there are kangaroos and wombat holes everywhere and there are not many rabbits around because of colisi virus, and pigs are a very popular quarry. i have a bull arab for pigs and he does not even look at roos or wombats but could change if he ran with some bloodthirsty lurchers. I recently lost my old grey/ridgeback cross who was definitely not roo or anything proof, but was stock proof (thankfully for his life expectancy) but i have two pups- stag/saluki and a grew/stag that are still too young to do anything with and i am hoping they learn to be roo/wombat proof.

ideally i would like the three above mentioned dogs a kelpie as over here kelpies work cattle, sheep, bail pigs, catch rabbits, kill snakes, guard the house, cook and clean, etc, etc but i would want one in my pack as a bushing/bailing dog and cooking and cleaning lol. I also would love a jrt or jrt cross with either a beagle or patterdale. with this pack in the terrain i hunt i imagine alot of rabbits, foxes, hare, pigs and probably but hopefully not kangaroos or wombats will be in my freezer. interesting thread and happy hunting to all.

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Kangaroos and wombats are a native species and protected, you can get a license to shoot and harvest kangaroos, but to use dogs is highly illegal. Wombats I don't see much use in hunting them except pest control, their holes can cause major problems for vehicles and even structures but I would not want to harvest them and I have never heard of it being done.

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Slowly but surely, my 'bushing' dogs got bigger. I dont know if the term 'bushing dog' still applies if they weigh 30 kg + and stand 24'' +, and are not hammering brambles and gorse, but instead hunting through sitka spruce, heather, rocks and crags?

 

10 years ago, my needs ( as a keeper and pest controller) were purely pest control, and mostly foxes at that. I hunted covers, such as wooded ravines, bracken covered crags, hardwood and forestry blocks, reshes, heathery fells, any odd spots of cover where the fox's lay up. If I had mates out, the cover would be worked like a small drive, otherwise I would cast the dogs into the cover, and hope to guess where the fox should exit to get a shot and slip the running dog.

The best dogs for this are hot-nosed (you dont want a hound that will run old tracks), and they need to cast out and search the entire cover for scent. I wanted them to be heading back to me if they didnt locate a fox in the cover, and if they put one out in the opposite direction, as often happens when out alone, I didnt want them to disappear on his trail, but I didnt mind a short hunt-up of a mile or so, just incase he goes to ground, which happened now and then. And I didnt want them to follow him under. I found these attributes in the spaniel cross terrier. They were also easy to train, and easy to handle.

 

Nowadays, Im using a german wirehaired pointer for finding and driving game in cover or hill (deer/boar/fox), and though free-hunting every morning, she is obedient enough to take stalking, she blood tracks very well and can hold a wounded deer. I take her snipe and woodcock shooting, she is an excellent bird-dog with a good retrieve, and great in water. She also hunts rabbit now and then. She can mark 'to ground', and has a bit of experience tree-marking. She hunts closed-mouthed, unless sighted, and will stay on healthy game for 2/3 kilometers. She has gone further on a gut-shot stag. Too big to hit tight cover regularly, but we dont have much of that here. I hope to breed my next generation from this bitch, producing a wirehair/bull/deerhound type that should make hardy and very robust hunting dogs for rough land or big game.

I like a hunt to be fast, and not to cover too much land. The quarry is often big. My permisions are not huge so hounds are out the question though one day I will have the space for a brace!

 

I could have perhaps stuck with the spaniel/terriers all along, and still done ok even on the boar etc... but on this rough mountain, the bigger dogs cover it so much faster, and I like having dogs with a bit of beef when the need arrises. I could also use a thousand other breeds, types or crosses to the same/similar effect, but I like what Im running and im getting the job done. With a good plan for future breeding I reckon Im sorted with these bigger 'bushing dogs', for my needs. I should also add, that a lot of my hunting will be outside of the UK, and within 5 years I will be based outside the UK, so I have had to plan ahead somewhat regarding future needs as well as present.

 

Its been great reading about other folks dogs, and how they hunt them. The variety is amazing, thats part of the joy of the sport I guess.

 

Good hunting

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Slowly but surely, my 'bushing' dogs got bigger. I dont know if the term 'bushing dog' still applies if they weigh 30 kg + and stand 24'' +, and are not hammering brambles and gorse, but instead hunting through sitka spruce, heather, rocks and crags?

 

10 years ago, my needs ( as a keeper and pest controller) were purely pest control, and mostly foxes at that. I hunted covers, such as wooded ravines, bracken covered crags, hardwood and forestry blocks, reshes, heathery fells, any odd spots of cover where the fox's lay up. If I had mates out, the cover would be worked like a small drive, otherwise I would cast the dogs into the cover, and hope to guess where the fox should exit to get a shot and slip the running dog.

The best dogs for this are hot-nosed (you dont want a hound that will run old tracks), and they need to cast out and search the entire cover for scent. I wanted them to be heading back to me if they didnt locate a fox in the cover, and if they put one out in the opposite direction, as often happens when out alone, I didnt want them to disappear on his trail, but I didnt mind a short hunt-up of a mile or so, just incase he goes to ground, which happened now and then. And I didnt want them to follow him under. I found these attributes in the spaniel cross terrier. They were also easy to train, and easy to handle.

 

Nowadays, Im using a german wirehaired pointer for finding and driving game in cover or hill (deer/boar/fox), and though free-hunting every morning, she is obedient enough to take stalking, she blood tracks very well and can hold a wounded deer. I take her snipe and woodcock shooting, she is an excellent bird-dog with a good retrieve, and great in water. She also hunts rabbit now and then. She can mark 'to ground', and has a bit of experience tree-marking. She hunts closed-mouthed, unless sighted, and will stay on healthy game for 2/3 kilometers. She has gone further on a gut-shot stag. Too big to hit tight cover regularly, but we dont have much of that here. I hope to breed my next generation from this bitch, producing a wirehair/bull/deerhound type that should make hardy and very robust hunting dogs for rough land or big game.

I like a hunt to be fast, and not to cover too much land. The quarry is often big. My permisions are not huge so hounds are out the question though one day I will have the space for a brace!

 

I could have perhaps stuck with the spaniel/terriers all along, and still done ok even on the boar etc... but on this rough mountain, the bigger dogs cover it so much faster, and I like having dogs with a bit of beef when the need arrises. I could also use a thousand other breeds, types or crosses to the same/similar effect, but I like what Im running and im getting the job done. With a good plan for future breeding I reckon Im sorted with these bigger 'bushing dogs', for my needs. I should also add, that a lot of my hunting will be outside of the UK, and within 5 years I will be based outside the UK, so I have had to plan ahead somewhat regarding future needs as well as present.

 

Its been great reading about other folks dogs, and how they hunt them. The variety is amazing, thats part of the joy of the sport I guess.

 

Good hunting

 

great to read and every different crosses people use :thumbs:

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