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foxhound45

Working Airedale Terriers

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So w

 

They have good noses, without a pack behind them most would rather walk away, or skip around baying. :)

 

:hmm::blink: I must admit I've only had experience of one Airedale, but that definitely isn't the case with mine, but of course I've not tried her on boar, bear or cougar. I doubt anyone would want their dog to go one on one with something that large, but smaller, toothed quarry is a walk in the park for my bitch, though it must be said that she's not fast enough to catch one s/h in the open.
So will your puppies come with the same promise that they won't let you down,or will there be the same clause that if it does it needs another year or you did something wrong entering it.

Brian plumber springs to mind reading some of this thread.

Edited by weasle
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Go on any american website see pictures of the same even racoons,useful if you are using them to shoot a bear or couger not so useful in the middle of a field in the middle of the night.

Edited by weasle
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So w

 

They have good noses, without a pack behind them most would rather walk away, or skip around baying. :)

:hmm::blink: I must admit I've only had experience of one Airedale, but that definitely isn't the case with mine, but of course I've not tried her on boar, bear or cougar. I doubt anyone would want their dog to go one on one with something that large, but smaller, toothed quarry is a walk in the park for my bitch, though it must be said that she's not fast enough to catch one s/h in the open.
So will your puppies come with the same promise that they won't let you down,or will there be the same clause that if it does it needs another year or you did something wrong entering it.

Brian plumber springs to mind reading some of this thread.

 

Don't be spiteful Weasle :laugh::laugh:

 

Seriously though, how could anyone absolutely guarantee 100% what any breed or type will or won't do in the field. I can only speak from my limited experience, as I already said. But, from what I have read and seen about the working Airedales in the USA; most, not all, will tackle and kill medium sized biting quarry with ease. Surely it is the same for an earth dog (small terrier) when it comes to breeding for a specific task. You wouldn't, or rather shouldn't, breed from anything but the best, the dogs and bitches that do their job correctly and well. Even then, not every pup will make the grade, though having a good owner helps enormously; one who exposes the pup to work at the right age having brought it on correctly. That may sound as though I'm sitting on the fence, but nothing is ever certain in life.

 

Not all dogs are born equal. Take Dill's lurcher daughters. One is exactly like Dill: full on, driven, hard as nails. The other is slightly less driven and I don't know if she'd tackle a fox s/h, if it were legal to do so of course. If and when I do breed from Dill, I'll do my best to place the pups according to their drive and temperament in the homes which are right from them, and there'll be no guarantees of anything apart from having great temperaments and a willingness to please and work hard. What exactly that work will entail remains to be seen. Not everyone wants a fox smashing dog when they think of owning an Airedale: bushing, wild fowling, ferreting companion ... like any dog whose roots lie in the hunting/working arena, they are more than willing and capable of doing varied jobs.

 

Now as to whether or not they are the best at any of them is another question altogether. As the original Airedale was supposed to have been bred as a farm/hunting/guard/companion animal, they are first and foremost a bloody good fun dog to go out with, with loyalty and enthusiasm by the bucketful.

 

I would be stupid to cast any of my beliefs in the Airedale in stone as I have so little experience of the breed as a whole: similarly, I wouldn't expect anyone else who only has limited experience of the breed to say hand on heart that the breed is this or that. One swallow doesn't make a summer, and judging a whole breed from one or two examples is somewhat blinkered.

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So w

 

 

They have good noses, without a pack behind them most would rather walk away, or skip around baying. :)

 

:hmm::blink: I must admit I've only had experience of one Airedale, but that definitely isn't the case with mine, but of course I've not tried her on boar, bear or cougar. I doubt anyone would want their dog to go one on one with something that large, but smaller, toothed quarry is a walk in the park for my bitch, though it must be said that she's not fast enough to catch one s/h in the open.
So will your puppies come with the same promise that they won't let you down,or will there be the same clause that if it does it needs another year or you did something wrong entering it.

Brian plumber springs to mind reading some of this thread.

Don't be spiteful Weasle :laugh::laugh:

 

Seriously though, how could anyone absolutely guarantee 100% what any breed or type will or won't do in the field. I can only speak from my limited experience, as I already said. But, from what I have read and seen about the working Airedales in the USA; most, not all, will tackle and kill medium sized biting quarry with ease. Surely it is the same for an earth dog (small terrier) when it comes to breeding for a specific task. You wouldn't, or rather shouldn't, breed from anything but the best, the dogs and bitches that do their job correctly and well. Even then, not every pup will make the grade, though having a good owner helps enormously; one who exposes the pup to work at the right age having brought it on correctly. That may sound as though I'm sitting on the fence, but nothing is ever certain in life.

 

Not all dogs are born equal. Take Dill's lurcher daughters. One is exactly like Dill: full on, driven, hard as nails. The other is slightly less driven and I don't know if she'd tackle a fox s/h, if it were legal to do so of course. If and when I do breed from Dill, I'll do my best to place the pups according to their drive and temperament in the homes which are right from them, and there'll be no guarantees of anything apart from having great temperaments and a willingness to please and work hard. What exactly that work will entail remains to be seen. Not everyone wants a fox smashing dog when they think of owning an Airedale: bushing, wild fowling, ferreting companion ... like any dog whose roots lie in the hunting/working arena, they are more than willing and capable of doing varied jobs.

 

Now as to whether or not they are the best at any of them is another question altogether. As the original Airedale was supposed to have been bred as a farm/hunting/guard/companion animal, they are first and foremost a bloody good fun dog to go out with, with loyalty and enthusiasm by the bucketful.

 

I would be stupid to cast any of my beliefs in the Airedale in stone as I have so little experience of the breed as a whole: similarly, I wouldn't expect anyone else who only has limited experience of the breed to say hand on heart that the breed is this or that. One swallow doesn't make a summer, and judging a whole breed from one or two examples is somewhat blinkered.

This is not a dig......but how useful is your dog to you & the hunting you do? Does she really earn her place in a working dog kennel & if she wasn't, would you still have her?

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No one can guarantee that's the point I was making.

Dog in pic was driven but wouldn't commit if it meant getting bit or hurt,seen her pull up on rabbits if they ran under electric fence even though it was one strand 3 ft high.more than capable of killing a fox,BUT only if with another dog OR she could get a perfect hold straight away. Totally different dog if out with others.

Any American site there will be plenty of people outside the Airedale lovers who will say they wouldn't give one house room because they lack that (stupidity) if you like to get hurt.(maybe coincidence.) :)

Yet on here there all very hard blah blah,if they were there is nothing in uk you would need to keep packs of a bloody great big terrier for.

Agree there a nice dog if you want something to find game ect, I would have one my self for that and if it did anything else it would be a bonus ,I'm sure SOME do.

But surely it would be better for any one looking for a pup to know this from the start,rather than finding out the dog they have isn't what they expected.

Funny how theses long post about how wonderful a dog is,always end in pups available soon :)

But skycat hope you breed yours and find good homes for them.

Edited by weasle

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So w

 

They have good noses, without a pack behind them most would rather walk away, or skip around baying. :)

:hmm::blink: I must admit I've only had experience of one Airedale, but that definitely isn't the case with mine, but of course I've not tried her on boar, bear or cougar. I doubt anyone would want their dog to go one on one with something that large, but smaller, toothed quarry is a walk in the park for my bitch, though it must be said that she's not fast enough to catch one s/h in the open.
So will your puppies come with the same promise that they won't let you down,or will there be the same clause that if it does it needs another year or you did something wrong entering it.

Brian plumber springs to mind reading some of this thread.

Don't be spiteful Weasle :laugh::laugh:

 

Seriously though, how could anyone absolutely guarantee 100% what any breed or type will or won't do in the field. I can only speak from my limited experience, as I already said. But, from what I have read and seen about the working Airedales in the USA; most, not all, will tackle and kill medium sized biting quarry with ease. Surely it is the same for an earth dog (small terrier) when it comes to breeding for a specific task. You wouldn't, or rather shouldn't, breed from anything but the best, the dogs and bitches that do their job correctly and well. Even then, not every pup will make the grade, though having a good owner helps enormously; one who exposes the pup to work at the right age having brought it on correctly. That may sound as though I'm sitting on the fence, but nothing is ever certain in life.

 

Not all dogs are born equal. Take Dill's lurcher daughters. One is exactly like Dill: full on, driven, hard as nails. The other is slightly less driven and I don't know if she'd tackle a fox s/h, if it were legal to do so of course. If and when I do breed from Dill, I'll do my best to place the pups according to their drive and temperament in the homes which are right from them, and there'll be no guarantees of anything apart from having great temperaments and a willingness to please and work hard. What exactly that work will entail remains to be seen. Not everyone wants a fox smashing dog when they think of owning an Airedale: bushing, wild fowling, ferreting companion ... like any dog whose roots lie in the hunting/working arena, they are more than willing and capable of doing varied jobs.

 

Now as to whether or not they are the best at any of them is another question altogether. As the original Airedale was supposed to have been bred as a farm/hunting/guard/companion animal, they are first and foremost a bloody good fun dog to go out with, with loyalty and enthusiasm by the bucketful.

 

I would be stupid to cast any of my beliefs in the Airedale in stone as I have so little experience of the breed as a whole: similarly, I wouldn't expect anyone else who only has limited experience of the breed to say hand on heart that the breed is this or that. One swallow doesn't make a summer, and judging a whole breed from one or two examples is somewhat blinkered.

This is not a dig......but how useful is your dog to you & the hunting you do? Does she really earn her place in a working dog kennel & if she wasn't, would you still have her?

 

Very valid question in my mind,and one a lot should ask themselves,?????????????

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I'm after a pup but it ain't to do heavy terrier work or to breed lurchers off it. I'm wanting an alround hunting dog which will be used to track mark ferret retrieve and a few other jobs and anything else it can turn its paws to so to speak.

Edited by Hot Meat

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I'm after a pup but it ain't to do heavy terrier work or to breed our hers off it. I'm wanting an alround hunting dog which will be used to track mark ferret retrieve and a few other jobs and anything else it can turn its paws to so to speak.

 

Have you come into contact with the working type before?

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No pal I haven't. Used to use a couple of kc dogs in the 80s as kids for ferreting and pushing foxes out of cover or to ground in urban glasgow tho. I use a lakie a collie and a couple of lakiex collies to do similar work now and a bit more. My ferreting partner knows exactly what I want from a dog though after seeing mine graft for a good few seasons now. He has been outwitj both my dogs and sky cats and thinks one if the Airedales would do well replacing my old lakie. I will see them in flesh and working tho if penny is kind enough to breed me a pup at some point. But no I have never been outwith a working redline Airedale hunting

Edited by Hot Meat

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No pal I haven't. Used to use a couple of kc dogs in the 80s as kids for ferreting and pushing foxes out of cover or to ground in urban glasgow tho. I use a lakie a collie and a couple of lakiex collies to do similar work now and a bit more. My ferreting partner knows exactly what I want from a dog though after seeing mine graft for a good few seasons now. He has been outwitj both my dogs and sky cats and thinks one if the Airedales would do well replacing my old lakie. I will see them in flesh and working tho if penny is kind enough to breed me a pup at some point. But no I have never been outwith a working redline Airedale hunting

Fair enough mate, I just find it interesting whenever someone puts something a bit out of the ordinary to good use, but do you think because it's a bit more specialist, owners would be more likely to give them more leeway over your usual breeds, until they make that decision about the dogs usefulness?

Good luck with your plan though.

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This is not a dig......but how useful is your dog to you & the hunting you do? Does she really earn her place in a working dog kennel & if she wasn't, would you still have her?

 

 

She is very useful indeed: I can use her for bushing/cover work where I daren't let the small terriers loose. Her nose is brilliant as she uses air scent much better than the small terriers. She is also very focussed, something I've also noticed and admired in her lurcher daughters. I've seldom seen such a sense of purpose combined with total focus on the job in hand. For example, some lurchers and terriers, will, if there's nothing to hunt, mess around, play etc. Not the Airedales: they just want to get to the next place to work, though during the summer when I take out tennis balls with the dogs they'll happily retrieve them over and over again. They just really need to be doing something, anything, that fulfils their drive.

 

Dill also retrieves fur and feather and is very soft mouthed on both, feather particularly. Her ability to air scent larger game from a great distance also amazes me, and she'll leave the bushing for rabbits if she gets a whiff of something larger. Her black daughter is the same and goes through any cover like an eel.

 

Would I have kept Dill if she was useless? No. I'd have found her a good pet home: she would have made a brilliant family/companion dog as well. When I was offered her sister at a year old due to the owner not being able to give her time as he was working away from home a lot, I saw very quickly that she didn't have the drive that Dill has. OK, I know she hadn't had the same upbringing as Dill, but her nature was softer, less driven. I found her a great home with a family through Airedale rescue. That is why I would never say that they are all brilliant workers. It's the same for any breed of dog. Some will be outstanding, some average, and some won't make the grade. For me, drive is almost everything: without drive, plus the intelligence and nose to use it properly, you just don't have a dog that has the will to succeed in what it does, no matter what that job might be. I reckon she'd have made a great drug sniffer dog as well: it's all about the drive and nose.

 

The same thing applies to breeding: I wouldn't want to breed a litter of Airedales from her if she hadn't 100% impressed me in so many different ways. For me, she epitomizes what the Airedale should be, from what I've read and heard from other people that is.

 

Hope that answers your question.

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All dogs deserve a good crack a the whip mate. I've found jobs for most my useless mutts it's all about using what you've got IMO and from what I hear the Airedale is pretty versatile if I wanted a fox killerid get another wheaten or a half x bull. I'm after a dog that an use it's nose and do as many diffrent jobs as possible.

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the sligo think came up a blank foxhunter45 it turns out the two best workers was the original pair an thats the ones you already have, there may still be a pup or two of them being worked at cover from what i was told. good luck mate in what your trying to Achieve

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This is not a dig......but how useful is your dog to you & the hunting you do? Does she really earn her place in a working dog kennel & if she wasn't, would you still have her?

 

She is very useful indeed: I can use her for bushing/cover work where I daren't let the small terriers loose. Her nose is brilliant as she uses air scent much better than the small terriers. She is also very focussed, something I've also noticed and admired in her lurcher daughters. I've seldom seen such a sense of purpose combined with total focus on the job in hand. For example, some lurchers and terriers, will, if there's nothing to hunt, mess around, play etc. Not the Airedales: they just want to get to the next place to work, though during the summer when I take out tennis balls with the dogs they'll happily retrieve them over and over again. They just really need to be doing something, anything, that fulfils their drive.

 

Dill also retrieves fur and feather and is very soft mouthed on both, feather particularly. Her ability to air scent larger game from a great distance also amazes me, and she'll leave the bushing for rabbits if she gets a whiff of something larger. Her black daughter is the same and goes through any cover like an eel.

 

Would I have kept Dill if she was useless? No. I'd have found her a good pet home: she would have made a brilliant family/companion dog as well. When I was offered her sister at a year old due to the owner not being able to give her time as he was working away from home a lot, I saw very quickly that she didn't have the drive that Dill has. OK, I know she hadn't had the same upbringing as Dill, but her nature was softer, less driven. I found her a great home with a family through Airedale rescue. That is why I would never say that they are all brilliant workers. It's the same for any breed of dog. Some will be outstanding, some average, and some won't make the grade. For me, drive is almost everything: without drive, plus the intelligence and nose to use it properly, you just don't have a dog that has the will to succeed in what it does, no matter what that job might be. I reckon she'd have made a great drug sniffer dog as well: it's all about the drive and nose.

 

The same thing applies to breeding: I wouldn't want to breed a litter of Airedales from her if she hadn't 100% impressed me in so many different ways. For me, she epitomizes what the Airedale should be, from what I've read and heard from other people that is.

 

Hope that answers your question.

Yeh totally thanks.....no wonder you want to bring on one of her offspring. Good luck

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just to let you know that i sent 4 redlines to ireland 2 slicks and 2 longcoats 3 of them a person on here should know about and i also know of 1 other that went out another longcoat that was from 4 wasted pups that i gave a minkhunting pack that never got worked ,the last 2 dogs you should look on the traditional working airedale website as the two owners have posted on there these are the only redlines i know of that went to ireland

Ian

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