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Ratreeper

Buzzards taking game

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i find a lot of carcasses around the pens on the land where i rough shoot(i dont shoot near the pens obviously) all seem to have their guts still in them but the choice bits have been removed im told by the keeper this is characteristic of buzzards taking them

 

Were these adult birds? Were they plucked at all too? I know they take young birds when they can and definitely capable of rabbits but I am now really unsure on their ability to take phessies adults regularly.

They dont often take adult birds, you are correct in saying that. Its the damage they do before that stage though........ :thumbs:

 

Do you reckon it is the odd persistent bird, or if that bird 'disappeared' and another pair moved in would they still do it? Because that is really all I was trying to say in the other thread before I started doubting myself, is that simply because there are so many buzzards another can just move in and it would be an endless cycle until their numbers were back down again. I have seen impressive pheasant pens though with double fences with about 6' inbetween, would that stop them being shocked to death? I am just trying to get my head around the problem now and see if there is a win-win solution.

100% no its not 1 or 2 persistent birds as problem birds 'disappear' as you say. Even the best pens with maximum ground cover has to have feed rides and sunny ares and thats where you'll find your kills. The spar' uses the feed rides to swoop in fast and kill. I see folk saying the buzzard is lazy, yes it is, but it doesn't need to do much in a pen full of inexperienced poults, it just drops on top of them in seconds.

 

 

you should know mate the cure for all our problems is to just net the pens!!! :icon_redface: :icon_redface: :D :D :D :D

:laugh: .......wondered when the "buzzard alarm" would go off on your computer.... :laugh:

How are you getting on with that 10 acre net anyway......?.. :bye:

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i find a lot of carcasses around the pens on the land where i rough shoot(i dont shoot near the pens obviously) all seem to have their guts still in them but the choice bits have been removed im told by the keeper this is characteristic of buzzards taking them

 

Were these adult birds? Were they plucked at all too? I know they take young birds when they can and definitely capable of rabbits but I am now really unsure on their ability to take phessies adults regularly.

They dont often take adult birds, you are correct in saying that. Its the damage they do before that stage though........ :thumbs:

 

Do you reckon it is the odd persistent bird, or if that bird 'disappeared' and another pair moved in would they still do it? Because that is really all I was trying to say in the other thread before I started doubting myself, is that simply because there are so many buzzards another can just move in and it would be an endless cycle until their numbers were back down again. I have seen impressive pheasant pens though with double fences with about 6' inbetween, would that stop them being shocked to death? I am just trying to get my head around the problem now and see if there is a win-win solution.

100% no its not 1 or 2 persistent birds as problem birds 'disappear' as you say. Even the best pens with maximum ground cover has to have feed rides and sunny ares and thats where you'll find your kills. The spar' uses the feed rides to swoop in fast and kill. I see folk saying the buzzard is lazy, yes it is, but it doesn't need to do much in a pen full of inexperienced poults, it just drops on top of them in seconds.

 

 

you should know mate the cure for all our problems is to just net the pens!!! :icon_redface: :icon_redface: :D :D :D :D

:laugh: .......wondered when the "buzzard alarm" would go off on your computer.... :laugh:

How are you getting on with that 10 acre net anyway......?.. :bye:

 

That nets been a real c**t what with all those trees in the way :D :D

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i find a lot of carcasses around the pens on the land where i rough shoot(i dont shoot near the pens obviously) all seem to have their guts still in them but the choice bits have been removed im told by the keeper this is characteristic of buzzards taking them

 

Were these adult birds? Were they plucked at all too? I know they take young birds when they can and definitely capable of rabbits but I am now really unsure on their ability to take phessies adults regularly.

They dont often take adult birds, you are correct in saying that. Its the damage they do before that stage though........ :thumbs:

 

Do you reckon it is the odd persistent bird, or if that bird 'disappeared' and another pair moved in would they still do it? Because that is really all I was trying to say in the other thread before I started doubting myself, is that simply because there are so many buzzards another can just move in and it would be an endless cycle until their numbers were back down again. I have seen impressive pheasant pens though with double fences with about 6' inbetween, would that stop them being shocked to death? I am just trying to get my head around the problem now and see if there is a win-win solution.

100% no its not 1 or 2 persistent birds as problem birds 'disappear' as you say. Even the best pens with maximum ground cover has to have feed rides and sunny ares and thats where you'll find your kills. The spar' uses the feed rides to swoop in fast and kill. I see folk saying the buzzard is lazy, yes it is, but it doesn't need to do much in a pen full of inexperienced poults, it just drops on top of them in seconds.

 

 

you should know mate the cure for all our problems is to just net the pens!!! :icon_redface: :icon_redface: :D :D :D :D

:laugh: .......wondered when the "buzzard alarm" would go off on your computer.... :laugh:

How are you getting on with that 10 acre net anyway......?.. :bye:

 

That nets been a real c**t what with all those trees in the way :D :D

I think you were ment to cut them down mate...............what do you mean 'roost'????.. :D

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I bet the goshawks are accountable for more than the buzzards by a long way. . . maybe buzzards are caught scrounging the carion from gos's kills more than they actually take themselves.. there lazy and slow..

 

That would be my impression too - I loose a few poults to sprawks but the buzzards in these parts seem to prefer easier meals like bunnies, roadkill etc.

Edited by killbilly

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I bet the goshawks are accountable for more than the buzzards by a long way. . . maybe buzzards are caught scrounging the carion from gos's kills more than they actually take themselves.. there lazy and slow..

 

That would be my impression too - I loose a few poults to sprawks but the buzzards in these parts seem to prefer easier meals like bunnies, roadkill etc.

So you think a wild rabbit is easier pickings than a newly released poult? This is a question by the way not a statement as i dont know what ground you are on?

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I've seen a buzzard actively targetting feeding woodys, coming over a hedge fast and trying to grab one as they got up. I didnt see it suceed but was on the job several days and it kept on trying all that time, I went and checked the field once and there were alot of feathers spread about but no kills. I wouldnt have thought it'd waste the energy if it had never suceeded though?

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I bet the goshawks are accountable for more than the buzzards by a long way. . . maybe buzzards are caught scrounging the carion from gos's kills more than they actually take themselves.. there lazy and slow..

 

That would be my impression too - I loose a few poults to sprawks but the buzzards in these parts seem to prefer easier meals like bunnies, roadkill etc.

So you think a wild rabbit is easier pickings than a newly released poult? This is a question by the way not a statement as i dont know what ground you are on?

 

I guess it depends on the seize of the poults when released and how much cover you have on your shoot. Rabbits tend to feed out in the open more, on short turf etc. and the young ones are particulary clueless with regards to predators. Same goes for rats at harvest time when the barley/oats stubbles are swarming with them later in the summer. Maybe I'm lucky but the poults I release tend to stick to thick cover and I rarely see them wandering around in areas that would make them more vulnerable then the likes of rabbits etc.

Edited by killbilly

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I bet the goshawks are accountable for more than the buzzards by a long way. . . maybe buzzards are caught scrounging the carion from gos's kills more than they actually take themselves.. there lazy and slow..

 

That would be my impression too - I loose a few poults to sprawks but the buzzards in these parts seem to prefer easier meals like bunnies, roadkill etc.

So you think a wild rabbit is easier pickings than a newly released poult? This is a question by the way not a statement as i dont know what ground you are on?

 

I guess it depends on the seize of the poults when released and how much cover you have on your shoot. Rabbits tend to feed out in the open more, on short turf etc. and the young ones are particulary clueless with regards to predators. Same goes for rats at harvest time when the barley/oats stubbles are swarming with them later in the summer. Maybe I'm lucky but the poults I release tend to stick to thick cover and I rarely see them wandering around in areas that would make them more vulnerable then the likes of rabbits etc.

You sure your birds aint hiding? A sure sign of somethings up is when you arrive at your pen and you cant see your birds?... :thumbs: Do you find many BOP kills in your pens?

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You sure your birds aint hiding? A sure sign of somethings up is when you arrive at your pen and you cant see your birds?... :thumbs: Do you find many BOP kills in your pens?

 

I was talking more about in the immediate vicinity of the pens when the poults are getting their first tast of freedom - my pens have roof netting to keep out the unwanted avian guests which seems to work pretty well. I occasionally get visits from sparrowhawks at this time and they do take a few poults in the immdeditate vicinity of the pens but tbh the likes of mink and foxes are the ones that cos the real chaos when they visit - but I guess if these birds are to hack it in the "wild" they will have to be hardened to these type of stresses to some extent. Indeed birds that learn to keep to cover for their own good will ultimatley have a greater chance of turning up for the gun from November onwards and provide better sport for dogs working cover etc.

Edited by killbilly

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i find a lot of carcasses around the pens on the land where i rough shoot(i dont shoot near the pens obviously) all seem to have their guts still in them but the choice bits have been removed im told by the keeper this is characteristic of buzzards taking them

 

Were these adult birds? Were they plucked at all too? I know they take young birds when they can and definitely capable of rabbits but I am now really unsure on their ability to take phessies adults regularly.

no not adults they are newly released poults and you can regularly find half a dozen been killed in the immediate area not fully plucked either just enough to get them opened up intestines usualy still hanging out of them

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So there are mixed opinions from more experienced people than me. I agree with what killbilly says, it makes a lot of sense to me but I do take on board that some have a harder time than others. But with a secure pen and releasing birds a bit later, could this help?

 

This might sound daft, but has anyone ever tried using plastic buzzards around the pen? Because they are territorial and this could possibly deter a few from getting too close, just a thought as I look at the metal heron on the pond outside the office. Or if anyone would like to hire a lanky (but well spoken) prick to fly a trained buzzard around release areas to scare wild buzzards off, pm me and I will quit my job today.

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So there are mixed opinions from more experienced people than me. I agree with what killbilly says, it makes a lot of sense to me but I do take on board that some have a harder time than others. But with a secure pen and releasing birds a bit later, could this help?

 

This might sound daft, but has anyone ever tried using plastic buzzards around the pen? Because they are territorial and this could possibly deter a few from getting too close, just a thought as I look at the metal heron on the pond outside the office. Or if anyone would like to hire a lanky (but well spoken) prick to fly a trained buzzard around release areas to scare wild buzzards off, pm me and I will quit my job today.

 

I'm sure you'll be welcomed with open arms if you ask any keeper if you can fly a trained Buzzard around his release pens :whistling: ...........Open choke more likely!

You may scare the wild Buzzards off, but what do you think the poults will make of it?

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So there are mixed opinions from more experienced people than me. I agree with what killbilly says, it makes a lot of sense to me but I do take on board that some have a harder time than others. But with a secure pen and releasing birds a bit later, could this help?

 

This might sound daft, but has anyone ever tried using plastic buzzards around the pen? Because they are territorial and this could possibly deter a few from getting too close, just a thought as I look at the metal heron on the pond outside the office. Or if anyone would like to hire a lanky (but well spoken) prick to fly a trained buzzard around release areas to scare wild buzzards off, pm me and I will quit my job today.

 

 

LOL at the mixed opinions of experienced people :laugh: with the exception of lab just how many of the posters on this thread are full time professional keepers??

 

 

P.s I used the word professional to keep lab happy :D

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So there are mixed opinions from more experienced people than me. I agree with what killbilly says, it makes a lot of sense to me but I do take on board that some have a harder time than others. But with a secure pen and releasing birds a bit later, could this help?

 

This might sound daft, but has anyone ever tried using plastic buzzards around the pen? Because they are territorial and this could possibly deter a few from getting too close, just a thought as I look at the metal heron on the pond outside the office. Or if anyone would like to hire a lanky (but well spoken) prick to fly a trained buzzard around release areas to scare wild buzzards off, pm me and I will quit my job today.

 

 

LOL at the mixed opinions of experienced people :laugh: with the exception of lab just how many of the posters on this thread are full time professional keepers??

 

 

P.s I used the word professional to keep lab happy :D

 

Full time, technically no. But that's because training & consultancy work pays far more.

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