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Brother to sister mating is it to close,


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and i will without a second thought get a pup bought in if what i breed doesn’t make the grade i want good killers i wouldn’t dream of breeding litters keeping shite just to say it’s my line life is to short

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A brother sister mating from which a bitch was again put back to the sire produced this dog. Like the rest of the litter he is bursting with health and vitality and hes slightly bigger than both of hi

mC you are totally wrong about a terrier not being a performance athlete, a terrier gone to ground working Fox and Badger (historically) pushes its body through the pain barrier more than any other ca

my old bitch bred like that she thrived on lots of stick n the stronger the hares the better for her. 

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Just now, jeemes said:

And every time you remove these faults from a breeding program you are removing them from the strain.

Ive seen a few Greyhounds with very bad mouths but it didnt effect there track work. 

your not because the bad gene can still be dorment for ages until another has the same it’s called recessive both parents have to have it then it crops up

and a grey with a bad mouth on a track doesn’t need it a hunting dog does 

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3 minutes ago, mC HULL said:

your not because the bad gene can still be dorment for ages until another has the same it’s called recessive both parents have to have it then it crops up

and a grey with a bad mouth on a track doesn’t need it a hunting dog does 

 

1 minute ago, mC HULL said:

you know all about breeding jeemes 😂 tell me what you laughing at 😂 

Its just the way you interpret everything, you are like a child. Stop trying to score points, we all know both parents have to have the same recessive, but in a limited gene pool everytime you cull a fault you are cleansing the gene pool. Isnt that obvious? I didnt say it could happen in one go. The fault may not be evident in another sibling because it is masked by a pure dominant, but never the less you have still lessened the chance of it appearing. Most physical faults are recessive.

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Just now, jeemes said:

 

Its just the way you interpret everything, you are like a child. Stop trying to score points, we all know both parents have to have the same recessive, but in a limited gene pool everytime you cull a fault you are cleansing the gene pool. Isnt that obvious? I didnt say it could happen in one go. The fault may not be evident in another sibling because it is masked by a pure dominant, but never the less you have still lessened the chance of it appearing. Most physical faults are recessive.

so the dog with the bad gene you breed back to its dad again we’re the gene come from ?or it’s brother ? or into a relation within the small gene pool 

all i’m saying is how many top greyhounds racehorses hunting dogs or pit dogs are bred tight generation on generation ?

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2 minutes ago, mC HULL said:

so the dog with the bad gene you breed back to its dad again we’re the gene come from ?or it’s brother ? or into a relation within the small gene pool 

all i’m saying is how many top greyhounds racehorses hunting dogs or pit dogs are bred tight generation on generation ?

Dogs, horses, cows, sheep, chickens, Racing pigeons etc have all at some time been bred tight to fix traits. Look up Robert Bakewell in agriculture and you can find out for yourself how inbreeding has shaped the livestock of today.

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9 minutes ago, jeemes said:

Dogs, horses, cows, sheep, chickens, Racing pigeons etc have all at some time been bred tight to fix traits. Look up Robert Bakewell in agriculture and you can find out for yourself how inbreeding has shaped the livestock of today.

do horse breeders breed brother sister ? sheep breeders ? cow breeders ? and how many do it over and over again successive generations mate your talking nonsense 

why would you even want to ? 

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Can’t start a line without a bit of line breeding/ inbreeding , brother sister , son daughter mother son , uncle aunt etc etc if your serious about starting a line you line breed but with line breeding you bring out the best and the worst so have to cull hard 

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24 minutes ago, Elchapo said:

Can’t start a line without a bit of line breeding/ inbreeding , brother sister , son daughter mother son , uncle aunt etc etc if your serious about starting a line you line breed but with line breeding you bring out the best and the worst so have to cull hard 

of cause you can gt grand-farther each side that was class 

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the only lurchers lads i know of to breed generations of dogs from close inbreeding seem to be bull x lads who also seem to struggle with litters and ai

 

This is not to say that inbreeding does not occur naturally. A wolf pack, which is isolated from other wolf packs, by geographical or other factors, can become very inbred. The effect of any deleterious genes becomes noticeable in later generations as the majority of the offspring inherit these genes. Scientists have discovered that wolves, even if living in different areas, are genetically very similar. Possibly the desolation of their natural habitat has drastically reduced wolf numbers in the past, creating a genetic bottleneck.

In the wolf, the lack of genetic diversity makes them susceptible to disease since they lack the ability to resist certain viruses. Extreme inbreeding affects their reproductive success with small litter sizes and high mortality rates. Some scientists hope that they can develop a more varied gene pool by introducing wolves from other areas into the inbred wolf packs.

Another animal suffering from the effects of inbreeding is the giant panda. As with the wolf, this has led to poor fertility among pandas and high infant mortality rates. As panda populations become more isolated from one another (due to humans blocking the routes which pandas once used to move from one area to another), pandas have greater difficulty in finding a mate with a different mix of genes and breed less successfully.

The ultimate result of continued inbreeding is terminal lack of vigor and probable extinction as the gene pool contracts, fertility decreases, abnormalities increase and mortality rates rise.

 

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2 hours ago, mC HULL said:

the only lurchers lads i know of to breed generations of dogs from close inbreeding seem to be bull x lads who also seem to struggle with litters and ai

 

This is not to say that inbreeding does not occur naturally. A wolf pack, which is isolated from other wolf packs, by geographical or other factors, can become very inbred. The effect of any deleterious genes becomes noticeable in later generations as the majority of the offspring inherit these genes. Scientists have discovered that wolves, even if living in different areas, are genetically very similar. Possibly the desolation of their natural habitat has drastically reduced wolf numbers in the past, creating a genetic bottleneck.

In the wolf, the lack of genetic diversity makes them susceptible to disease since they lack the ability to resist certain viruses. Extreme inbreeding affects their reproductive success with small litter sizes and high mortality rates. Some scientists hope that they can develop a more varied gene pool by introducing wolves from other areas into the inbred wolf packs.

Another animal suffering from the effects of inbreeding is the giant panda. As with the wolf, this has led to poor fertility among pandas and high infant mortality rates. As panda populations become more isolated from one another (due to humans blocking the routes which pandas once used to move from one area to another), pandas have greater difficulty in finding a mate with a different mix of genes and breed less successfully.

The ultimate result of continued inbreeding is terminal lack of vigor and probable extinction as the gene pool contracts, fertility decreases, abnormalities increase and mortality rates rise.

 

GOOGLE 😂

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2 hours ago, jeemes said:

Thats the trouble with trying to gain knowledge in 5 minutes on Google. You'll never learn anything mate, your too busy trying to sound clever. 

i’m just showing it’s common knowledge heavy inbreeding in a bad idea 

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7 hours ago, mC HULL said:

the only lurchers lads i know of to breed generations of dogs from close inbreeding seem to be bull x lads who also seem to struggle with litters and ai

 

This is not to say that inbreeding does not occur naturally. A wolf pack, which is isolated from other wolf packs, by geographical or other factors, can become very inbred. The effect of any deleterious genes becomes noticeable in later generations as the majority of the offspring inherit these genes. Scientists have discovered that wolves, even if living in different areas, are genetically very similar. Possibly the desolation of their natural habitat has drastically reduced wolf numbers in the past, creating a genetic bottleneck.

In the wolf, the lack of genetic diversity makes them susceptible to disease since they lack the ability to resist certain viruses. Extreme inbreeding affects their reproductive success with small litter sizes and high mortality rates. Some scientists hope that they can develop a more varied gene pool by introducing wolves from other areas into the inbred wolf packs.

Another animal suffering from the effects of inbreeding is the giant panda. As with the wolf, this has led to poor fertility among pandas and high infant mortality rates. As panda populations become more isolated from one another (due to humans blocking the routes which pandas once used to move from one area to another), pandas have greater difficulty in finding a mate with a different mix of genes and breed less successfully.

The ultimate result of continued inbreeding is terminal lack of vigor and probable extinction as the gene pool contracts, fertility decreases, abnormalities increase and mortality rates rise.

 

Doesn't matter if its Google if it's actually true, which it is👍 

Of course inbreeding is a must when establishing a breed in the the first place. But if your trying to improve your line for functional hunting dogs, you would want to improve on their physical traits, improve on their brain for running, improve recovery, improve immunity etc... heavily inbred isn't going to improve things or make them stronger....especially very closely bred because your not adding anything different or new in order to improve on it. 

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