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ferretguy12345

Whats peoples thoughts on unmated jills.

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

If you rely on the, well that's what I've always done and it's turned out fine, mentality then that's your problem and it certainly doesn't make you right. Tell me then, why leaving a jill in season is ok? Not the, well I've done it with my jills and they're fine approach, but actually WHY it is ok to do so?

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='ferretguy12345' timestamp='1314633213' post='2214812']

Its betavet alloa, £20. 46 for snip, and fifty for castration

 

Where about in Scotland are you at £46 for a snip ??.

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

If you rely on the, well that's what I've always done and it's turned out fine, mentality then that's your problem and it certainly doesn't make you right. Tell me then, why leaving a jill in season is ok? Not the, well I've done it with my jills and they're fine approach, but actually WHY it is ok to do so?

 

Hmmm because in my experience of leaving them in season nothing untowards has ever happened to a jill,no life shortening deaths or illness's. Not putting chemicals unneccesarily into their bodies to appease what is suggested MIGHT happen in books and these experiences leave myself in no doubt I'm doing nothing wrong :yes:

So OK ferret100 please tell why other animals are not brought out of season by injections? And while your talking to your vet ask him why its adviced to give dogs annual booster injections? :hmm: £££££££££££££££££

Y.I.S Leeview

Edited by Leeview

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='ferretguy12345' timestamp='1314633213' post='2214812']

Its betavet alloa, £20. 46 for snip, and fifty for castration

 

Where about in Scotland are you at £46 for a snip ??.

same place u get a box of frozen chicken carcass for £1.30 ;)

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I got my hob castrated and jill spayed so don't have to worry about any of this. Unlike dogs (according to some people), having a ferret neutered doesn't affect their working ability whatsoever, and it's quite cheap to do so for peace of mind I just had it done.

 

I'm not arsed about never being able to breed either of them because even if they are decent workers, there are so many ferrets out there that when the time comes for me to get another I'll just search round and find someone who's got decent workers and buy kits from them. :thumbs:

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

If you rely on the, well that's what I've always done and it's turned out fine, mentality then that's your problem and it certainly doesn't make you right. Tell me then, why leaving a jill in season is ok? Not the, well I've done it with my jills and they're fine approach, but actually WHY it is ok to do so?

 

Hmmm because in my experience of leaving them in season nothing untowards has ever happened to a jill,no life shortening deaths or illness's. Not putting chemicals unneccesarily into their bodies to appease what is suggested MIGHT happen in books and these experiences leave myself in no doubt I'm doing nothing wrong :yes:

So OK ferret100 please tell why other animals are not brought out of season by injections? And while your talking to your vet ask him why its adviced to give dogs annual booster injections? :hmm: £££££££££££££££££

Y.I.S Leeview

Have you ever actually seen a dog/ferret infected with CD or parvo? Or a jill with advanced aplastic anaemia? It's not a pretty sight and they aren't make believe conditions found in a book! Other animals are brought out of season via injections, dogs & cats are brought out of season with the same hormone regulators as ferrets are. Vaccines are advised to prevent illness/disease as prevention is better than cure, exactly the same principle of using hormone regulators in jills...to prevent aplastic anema/pyometra rather than treating the conditions after they have developed. Treating the conditions are much more expensive than preventing them in the first place, not to mention ensuring an animal doesn't suffer for no good reason.

 

The hormones that animals are injected with are the same naturally occuring hormones the animal already produces, not 'chemicals'. People don't always want to use hormones long-term, so a hoblet is another solution and spaying eliminates the issue altogether. Either way, leaving jills in season can and does cause serious problems, whether you have experienced them or not. If you would rather wait until a jill became ill in order to utilise alternative methods of bringing them out of season instead of ensuring it's prevented in the first place then that's your choice but I wouldn't recommend it and I don't think you should either.

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

 

Having learned the hard way how Galling it is to lose a ferret to anemia, I can quite happily say I think you are wrong, and will stand by that as long as you like!

 

If you keep Jills, minmise the risk to thier health by stopping thier season before potential health risks appear. Simple..

 

To any unexperienced keepers or newbies reading,, Your Jills are at risk of serious health issues or even death, if you leave them in season too long,, no if no buts,, there is a risk !! and as the animals keeper, it`s YOUR responsibility to minimise this risk!!!

 

ATB

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Have you ever actually seen a dog/ferret infected with CD or parvo? Or a jill with advanced aplastic anaemia? It's not a pretty sight and they aren't make believe conditions found in a book! Other animals are brought out of season via injections, dogs & cats are brought out of season with the same hormone regulators as ferrets are. Vaccines are advised to prevent illness/disease as prevention is better than cure, exactly the same principle of using hormone regulators in jills...to prevent aplastic anema/pyometra rather than treating the conditions after they have developed. Treating the conditions are much more expensive than preventing them in the first place, not to mention ensuring an animal doesn't suffer for no good reason.

 

The hormones that animals are injected with are the same naturally occuring hormones the animal already produces, not 'chemicals'. People don't always want to use hormones long-term, so a hoblet is another solution and spaying eliminates the issue altogether. Either way, leaving jills in season can and does cause serious problems, whether you have experienced them or not. If you would rather wait until a jill became ill in order to utilise alternative methods of bringing them out of season instead of ensuring it's prevented in the first place then that's your choice but I wouldn't recommend it and I don't think you should either.

 

 

Ever actually seen a dog or ferret infected with CD or parvo? Dog YES ferret NO but none of my animals have ever had either in all my time of keeping them :thumbs:

Or a jill with aplastic anemia? NO NEVER

Dogs and Cats are brought out of season :hmm: with the same hormone regulators as ferrets are. SURELY not due to the size difference in your 3 instances?

Vaccines are advised(administered)to prevent illness/disease as prevention is better than cure.NEVER DISPUTED THAT FACT BUT I ASKED ABOUT BOOSTERS :yes:

 

EITHER WAYS, leaving a jill in season CAN and does cause serious problems,wether you have experienced them or not, if you would rather wait until a jill became ill in order to use alternative methods of bringing them out of season instead of ensuring its prevented in the first place thats your choice but I would nt recommend it and I dont think you should either

 

CAN and MIGHT are very popular words with people trying to convince others what to do :hmm: Having had ferrets for over 50years Vasectomised hobs were unheard of :yes: jill jabs when did they come about? around about the same time as the fluffies brigade got into showing ferrets? So how did you manage before then? My experience leads me to believe its not neccessary to have them taken out of season with no ill effects whatsoever :thumbs:

Yourself on the other hand tell me what you think will happen to my ferrets if I dont do what you say :yes: and your experience of these illnesses/diseases are they first hand or read/heard from equally dubious sources

BUT hold on you jab your jills and snip your hobs so your ferrets cant possibly suffer from these symptoms you have seen can they

Y.I.S Leeview

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Jills should be bought out of season. If they return into season, then they should be brought out of season again until the breeding season ends. There is no arguement to defend leaving jills in season & exposing them to serious and potentially fatal risks, regardless of whether other peoples jills have survived.

 

Once again your stating YOUR opinion, others have stated theirs and you think they're wrong :blink: in your years of keeping ferrets Have you ever left a jill in season and had an adverse reaction from the jill? You'll answer NO because you against nature like to have them taken out of season for your peace of mind believing what you have heard/read MIGHT happen :yes: Myself on the other hand from experience leave them in season (unless I choose to breed from them) until they come out of season by themselves and have never had one adverse reaction caused by me doing this,if I had THEN I would have to consider these artificial methods of bringing them out of season,wether by operation or putting artificial chemicals into their bodies :huh: but the choice is mine based on experience not what someone else thinks might happen because they have read it in a book somewhere

Y.I.S Leeview

 

Having learned the hard way how Galling it is to lose a ferret to anemia, I can quite happily say I think you are wrong, and will stand by that as long as you like!

 

A FERRET OR ALL FERRETS LEFT IN SEASON?

 

If you keep Jills, minmise the risk to thier health by stopping thier season before potential health risks appear. Simple..

 

HAVING KEPT FERRETS FOR OVER 50(52 to be exact)yrs AND NEVER LOSING ONE JILL IN ALL THAT TIME THROUGH BEING LEFT IN SEASON LEADS ME TO MY REASONING

 

To any unexperienced keepers or newbies reading,, Your Jills are at risk of serious health issues or even death, if you leave them in season too long,, no if no buts,, there is a risk !! and as the animals keeper, it`s YOUR responsibility to minimise this risk!!!

 

ATB

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Well my experiences as first hand, and regardless of what was done 50 yrs ago,, it is still best practice to minimse the risk to your ferrets,, no brainer really.

 

Bit like saying,, "we never used to have collars so we don`t use them now",, use whatever is at your disposal, If animal welfare has moved on, so should we.

 

And this is what I would advise any newcomer to the sport,, I certainly wouldn`t tell them just to risk it,, and it IS a risk,, do you agree ??

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Lets round this argument up its getting out of hand and its now boring. If you leave your jills in season it leads to the levels of oestrogen to build up, causing progressive depression of bone marrow. This CAN lead to pancytopaenia, the abnormal depression of all 3 cell types in the blood. This CAN be potentially fatal, but DOES inevitably kill them before full life expectancy. When the vulva is swollen shes open to allsorts of infection, she will develop peritonitis this can kill her then and there, or for you lot that have all the experience it can clear up lol, well thats what your lead to believe, it actually lies dormant in the uterine glands, can do for years, once you breed her it kills her, there are many other infections that can end her life. For those who argue and ask, what would they do in the wild? Well heres your answer in the wild the wild polecat will breed at the first opportunity. If they didnt the polecat would be extinct. As they are more exposed to disease in the wild, and thats not out of a book, its common sense. There methods out there to take the jill out of season, if you have the experience or not and respect your ferret then you use them, if not thats fine.

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Lets round this argument up its getting out of hand and its now boring. If you leave your jills in season it leads to the levels of oestrogen to build up, causing progressive depression of bone marrow. This CAN lead to pancytopaenia, the abnormal depression of all 3 cell types in the blood. This CAN be potentially fatal, but DOES inevitably kill them before full life expectancy. When the vulva is swollen shes open to allsorts of infection, she will develop peritonitis this can kill her then and there, or for you lot that have all the experience it can clear up lol, well thats what your lead to believe, it actually lies dormant in the uterine glands, can do for years, once you breed her it kills her, there are many other infections that can end her life. For those who argue and ask, what would they do in the wild? Well heres your answer in the wild the wild polecat will breed at the first opportunity. If they didnt the polecat would be extinct. As they are more exposed to disease in the wild, and thats not out of a book, its common sense. There methods out there to take the jill out of season, if you have the experience or not and respect your ferret then you use them, if not thats fine.

 

So why have I never experienced these life shortening illnesses if you claim this is what does happen? Have I just had healthy well looked after ferrets fed on flesh for all these years that dont contract these diseases.If you claim to look after your ferrets this well where did you get all this experience of these diseases/illness's from? :hmm:

Y.I.S Leeview

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