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One of the many traits this lurcher of mine has that annoys me is his bowel movement,  on a normal round the block walk he does at least 3 sometimes 4 or 5 turds. They get progressively looser and it happens no matter what hes eaten. Any ideas what it could be? Can being highly strung cause it? 

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At the moment he's getting beef mince, lamb on the bone and I'm trying a hypoallergenic biscuit to see if that helps. If he gets chicken he gets the squits big time. 

Hes done the same for 4 years now.

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I would do away with the biscuits as they break down in the gut far slower meaning his digestive system is constantly working. Also try adding beg to his diet I use the frozen mixed veg bags from Tesco their cheap and spot on for the dogs. Adding more bone to his meal will tighten up his stools. You could also use some sf50 powder sprinkled on each meal. The thing is with digestive problems is that they often take a fair old while to settle so anything new you try to get a good result needs to be done for at least a month to allow the dogs gut to get used to it ........

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The psychotic womble had a lambs neck for tea last night about 11 ish and when I had him out for a fuss in the yard when I got home he did a typical bone fed turd. Just had him out round the roads now walking and he' done 4. 3 were boney and the third was dribbled down a tree impossible to pick up. If it was possible I'd say the twat does it on purpose. I have to plan my routes round fecking bins.

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Every lurcher ive owned has done same mate .Its natural for the shit to get runnier the more excercuse the dog has .Id be  more worried if he was off his food or has the squirts continuous .Is he kennelled or indoors .

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Kenneled mate, sod having this thing in the house.

I've never known a dog like it, my other runners have been fine and just dropped the lot in one go and maybe another if your out a good while and same with my terriers?

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Does it shit  in the kennel too or waiting for exercise to empty itself .If so there' your answer .I've had dogs that would never soil the kennel floor but shit for England in the garden  .They are all individuals and need treating as such .

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Dogs can suffer with stress related diarrhea, if there's no mucus or bloody likely not a big issue, just the way some are, try to minimize stress, did a bit on Colitis back along which may have a couple of ideas.

Colitis means inflammation of the colon, the colons role is the absorption of water and salt, the production of various hormones and the fermentation of dietary fibre which produces short chain fatty acids (SCFA). It contains a large population of bacteria to carry out the fermentation process and protect against harmful bacteria. After this process the muscular colon moves the residual waste to the rectum for storage prior to emptying. Colitis is not uncommon in dogs and the reasons are not entirely known but it is thought to be generally an immune mediated reaction to such things as bacteria or parasites with dietary factors often being involved. If there is a found causative factor then treatment will be based around the diagnosis but in many cases no definitive cause can be found. Some dog have functional diarrhoea often associated with stressors without physical changes to the gastric tract in line with IBS in humans. Canine IBS is most commonly found in working dogs but any highly strung animal can be at risk and removing the stress can often bring a cessation of symptoms but as this is only part of the problem a multi action treatment is often needed. Drugs are often required to bring about remission and the vet is where one needs to go as the first point of contact, as the underlying cause cannot always be found treatment is aimed a managing symptoms rather than cure and diet is also thought to play a major part. One method is the use of novel protein diets along with fermentable fibre and polyunsaturated fatty acids to give long term management. Elimination diets, prepared at home, provide a new protein with an appropriate carbohydrate, usually rice fed exclusively for at least 4 weeks. Once symptoms settle other foods can be added and response noted to identify any hypersensitivity. No extras in the form of supplements should be used during this period. Over the counter hypoallergenic diets follow the novel protein route with a variety of sources available such as rabbit, fish, duck etc and come with the option of added fibre. A second novel protein can be substituted for the first after a few weeks and maintained in the longer term. There is evidence to suggest that appropriate fibre has a role to play and that the fermentability of fibre is important in aiding nutrient absorption, colonic health and formation of the SCFA. Moderately fermentable fibre is suggested as best in producing adequate SCFA to maintain health and reduce incidence of colorectal tumours, commercial feeds use beet pulp to fulfil this role. In home prepared meals whole grain rice or the use of oats may be appropriate once symptoms are in remission. Another area with some evidence is the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids with studies showing a reduction in symptoms of some animals when fish oils is added to the diet. Dietary intervention is not a cure but it may help but please bare in mind it is not an easy option. One of the biggest problems faced by vets in treating this type of illness is poor owner compliance in that treats, table scraps, supplements etc being introduced whilst still in the elimination phase which makes the exercise fail so if an owner is considering a dietary approach to management then I would recommend a discussion with the vet, proper plan and very very strict adherence to that plan. Ps Chappie works for many.

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On 11/13/2017 at 10:59, socks said:

biscuits as they break down in the gut far slower meaning his digestive system is constantly working.

Could you elaborate on that statement?

I was under the impression that carbs, especially processed ones break down more quickly than say fat or protein.

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Dry food takes longer to digest than raw meat .... I put a post up on here a while back about it and I've proof ... I had a young dog that was a shit eater so I was feeding her raw with a scoop of dry meal to try and give her a bit extra .... she was also a shit traveller and when I took her out in the truck and she spewednit was ALWAYS dry biscuits that came up ......

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My beddy whpt is same her nickname is six shits!! Ive never known a dog like it no matter what she’s fed always 4,5 or sometimes 6 shits on a really long walk. Shes 9 now & always been like it. Atb

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