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Hi all, I have a Nite-Eye 3-9x40 Hawke scope. Is this scope suitable for a spring air rifle ? I currently have it on my .22 rimfire but am upgrading shortly. Any replies greatfully recieved.   

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Yep. Its perfect. Other than the Viper Connect, I cant think of any scope thats not suitable for an recoiling airgun. Just depends on pref. Some like um big, some like um small.

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I would say perfect . big powerfull scopes are a bit of fun on a pcp but on a spring gun they get a bit much 3 x 9 x 40 with a mil dot is all you need and maybe as big as you want to go .

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You don't need a big whack-off 50+mm front lens and a long body tube. A decent quality 3-9x40 and a mildot reticle will do the job perfect. What counts with a spring rifle, is the closer the reticle lies tom the bore-centre of your barrel, the better the accuracy  you'll get.

 

If you are going for an upgrade over your Nite Eye, Hawke Sidewinder 30mm body tube series are brilliant on a recoiling spring rifle. Got a 4-12x44 half-mildot model on my Pro Sport and the rifle loves it. Well worth considering. Hawke Varmint series seem like a nice scope for a springer too.

 

Just don't buy cheap, as they won't last long if your rifle is a bit punchy on recoil.

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On ‎11‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 02:54, pianoman said:

You don't need a big whack-off 50+mm front lens and a long body tube. A decent quality 3-9x40 and a mildot reticle will do the job perfect. What counts with a spring rifle, is the closer the reticle lies tom the bore-centre of your barrel, the better the accuracy  you'll get.

 

If you are going for an upgrade over your Nite Eye, Hawke Sidewinder 30mm body tube series are brilliant on a recoiling spring rifle. Got a 4-12x44 half-mildot model on my Pro Sport and the rifle loves it. Well worth considering. Hawke Varmint series seem like a nice scope for a springer too.

 

Just don't buy cheap, as they won't last long if your rifle is a bit punchy on recoil.

 

I'm really not trying to be picky but accuracy is the wrong word, the lowest sensible height for scope mounting will always give you the best shooting tolerances

Scope height doesn't make any difference to the rifle accuracy, your pellet will always land accurately and repeatability if your scope is high or low, and if you set both zeros to (say) 30 yards then the accuracy will be identical at 30 yards and every other distance, but the lower mounted scope will give you a little more tolerance either side of your zero distance!

Being a springer has nothing to do with it either, it makes no difference if it is a spring air rifle or a .308!

Edited by Deker

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Okay. But if you have better or best tollerances, what does that ultimately give you?

 

I have an excellent Simmons Pro Air 6-18x40 scope. Mounting it on low mounts to my HW77 .22 rifle, it is superbly accurate in zero. Pretty much a raggy single hole group with 10 pellets at 30 metres.  But mounting it to the same rifle, with high mounts, the zero was not so hot. Over an inch spread at 30 metres. And I could not improve it by technique. So perhaps, tolerences do affect accuracy if they are so altered?

I'm not saying you are wrong in any way Deker and I do respect what you have written. But my actual experience of trials with varying scope height does seem to have produced significant differences in accuracy. At least in this respect of scope to rifle.

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