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W. Katchum

Steel??

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Another daft question haha

 

I've seen some folk make knifes out for mower blades an files an rasps. An even with file ones tbey don't need a forge to make a blade. Can anything else be re used. I found a few old pairs or sheep shears I think they are? Proper rusty an unwanted so I grabbed em to see of they any good?? Any ideas if tbey are or should I bin em haha?

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Another daft question haha

I've seen some folk make knifes out for mower blades an files an rasps. An even with file ones tbey don't need a forge to make a blade. Can anything else be re used. I found a few old pairs or sheep shears I think they are? Proper rusty an unwanted so I grabbed em to see of they any good?? Any ideas if tbey are or should I bin em haha?

depends what they made from , I should think they would be fine as if they are shears they should be of a good steel to hold an edge

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Thats what I was thinking haha maybe a clean up an Reshape it?

yea if you begging in knifes then stock removal reprofileing is easiest...just keep wetting the blade when you grinding

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files and the like really need anealing to work them then re heat treat . most are shite just case hardened. old files are the best .

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files and the like really need anealing to work them then re heat treat . most are shite just case hardened. old files are the best .

Don't suppose ye fancy giving an idiots guide to it do ye haha.

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files and the like really need anealing to work them then re heat treat . most are shite just case hardened. old files are the best .

Don't suppose ye fancy giving an idiots guide to it do ye haha.

 

put it in the fire get it red hot and let it cool naturally it should soften it so you can work it

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files and the like really need anealing to work them then re heat treat . most are shite just case hardened. old files are the best .

 

Don't suppose ye fancy giving an idiots guide to it do ye haha.

put it in the fire get it red hot and let it cool naturally it should soften it so you can work it

Just the once? An then I be able to grind it to shape??

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files and the like really need anealing to work them then re heat treat . most are shite just case hardened. old files are the best .

Don't suppose ye fancy giving an idiots guide to it do ye haha.

put it in the fire get it red hot and let it cool naturally it should soften it so you can work it

Just the once? An then I be able to grind it to shape??

 

if its still to hard to work do it again if it doesnt work then bin it and buy one from me :tongue2:

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It may just come to that haha its for me lad but he wants have a bash with me to try make one so we gonna try haha

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Another daft question haha

 

I've seen some folk make knifes out for mower blades an files an rasps. An even with file ones tbey don't need a forge to make a blade. Can anything else be re used. I found a few old pairs or sheep shears I think they are? Proper rusty an unwanted so I grabbed em to see of they any good?? Any ideas if tbey are or should I bin em haha?

Touch it to the grinder and if you get fine bushy sparks it is most likely carbon steel and good to try making a blade with. Mild steel has long straight bright sparks and not good for blades.

 

Old stuff is usually better (less case hardening about in the old days) and if it has been some type of blade before the likely hood is it will work as a knife. The sheep shears will be thin, usually rely on a stiffener along the back if it is what i am thinking of, would be good for making small blades. Have used old garden shears myself for a heaver blade. Leaf spring, OLD files, circular saw blades all good to try.

 

Unless you can grind the whole thing without burning the temper ( anything other than yellow/bronze will kill the temper eg blue) you will need to heat red hot to the point a magnet won't stick let cool and let cool slowly (anneal) Grind your blade to shape at this stage.

 

Next harden by heating to red hot again and quench in thin oil, old vegetable oil works well. (if you know the steel can stand it quench in brine or water which cools it faster and thus harder but more brittle and inclined to crack during quenching or soon after.) Leave it in the hardened state as little time as possible as prone to stress fracture, go straight on the tempering.

 

To temper rub the steel bright so you can see the color. Gently heat with gas torch NOT TOO FAST let straw color spread across the blade start at the thicker back and let it spread across to the thinner cutting edge. Take the heat off before the color reaches the thin cutting edge and it will continue to spread with the heat already in the blade. Don't quench at this stage but let air cool. If you blue the cutting edge you have to start again with anneal and harden.

 

Alternatively to temper bung it in the oven at 220ish Celsius(your oven stat may be different so experiment first with a cutting, should go the straw color. Turning to bronze is ok but don't let it go as far as brown and definitely not blue) and let it soak for half an hour or more. That's it ready to sharpen.

 

Tip: take a cutting of unknown steel you plan to use, spend as little time as poss and form something that resembles a cutting edge on it. Anneal, harden and temper it then sharpen it and try slicing stuff to see how it preforms. Better waste an hour or two doing this than spend 2 days working on a beautiful blade that cracks when you quench it or wont take an edge.

 

Have fun

 

Griff.

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