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Badgers In Daylight


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#16 Greyman

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:14 pm

Nice one Foxdropper, a beautiful animal that deserves nothing but respect IMO.
Thanks to the Irish government they're not the pest over here that they are over there. 
I love to see them healthy and not sitting in a snare for 3 or 4 days.
My favourite wild animal along with the Hare.

sadly though one was the ultimate challenge for terrier men and the other the ultimate challenge for the running dog men, now both are completely untouchable to anyone and the badger has spread completely untouched and unchecked for many years and the hare has been almost wiped out near me by the spread of the badgers, I have nothing against badgers and think they are a great animal and a real part of the U.K. countryside but I also believe that when farm animals are breaking legs falling in holes, tractors can't go on some ground for fear of it caving in and cowsheds full of tb infected animals have badgers digging setts underneath them, it's time to give back the powers of control to the people who,s lives are being affected and have to live with them rather than some little pencil neck in a suit stuck in an office that thinks the countryside is a local park, I,l get off my soap box now sorry
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#17 foxdropper

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 06:42 am

Well said mate

#18 neil cooney

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 11:12 am

That's the thing. The situation in Britain is proof that what should be a loved and respected animal when allowed get out of hand can become a major nuisance.

Whereas here in Ireland most people still hold them in the respect they deserve.

I don't even believe that they spread disease like they say they do and IMO it's just keeping vets in jobs.

Two countries side by side with 2 completely different badger situations.

Also, even though our badgers in both countries are one and the same, Meles Meles, it's been proven that the badger in Ireland has a lot of different habits than those in Britain. I read somewhere that the badgers in Ireland have more in common to the badger of Scandinavia than in closer Britain.


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#19 Greyman

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 02:57 pm

That's the thing. The situation in Britain is proof that what should be a loved and respected animal when allowed get out of hand can become a major nuisance.
Whereas here in Ireland most people still hold them in the respect they deserve.
I don't even believe that they spread disease like they say they do and IMO it's just keeping vets in jobs.
Two countries side by side with 2 completely different badger situations.
Also, even though our badgers in both countries are one and the same, Meles Meles, it's been proven that the badger in Ireland has a lot of different habits than those in Britain. I read somewhere that the badgers in Ireland have more in common to the badger of Scandinavia than in closer Britain.

interesting bit of badger trivia there Neil clooney, like that a lot

#20 rob284

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 03:33 pm

That's the thing. The situation in Britain is proof that what should be a loved and respected animal when allowed get out of hand can become a major nuisance.
Whereas here in Ireland most people still hold them in the respect they deserve.
I don't even believe that they spread disease like they say they do and IMO it's just keeping vets in jobs.
Two countries side by side with 2 completely different badger situations.
Also, even though our badgers in both countries are one and the same, Meles Meles, it's been proven that the badger in Ireland has a lot of different habits than those in Britain. I read somewhere that the badgers in Ireland have more in common to the badger of Scandinavia than in closer Britain.

the english feed more on worms and are more likely to live in bigger groups, whereas the irish are more solitary and feed on some insect. Theres a good article on it i read a while ago.
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#21 foxdropper

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 06:31 am

Like anything ,they are opotunists and will go WHERE the food is .Eggs ,young rabbits and carrion are mostly overlooked by many people as being part of their diet but it is .Dry spells are hard on them that I do know when slugs and snails,worms etc are hard to find .
Imo there is a link between badgers and tb as well as deer .
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#22 Ratmanwan

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 07:40 am

Out foxing on a chicken farm this week and my mate watched a badger running down and killing chickens that were jugging down in the grass.
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#23 3175darren

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 09:28 am

Out foxing on a chicken farm this week and my mate watched a badger running down and killing chickens that were jugging down in the grass.

pity he didn't get a bit of video, to show them for what they are, and stick on YouTube, people might wake up to them then, Brian may would swear they were playing though, the public have had the wool pulled over there eyes for long enough,sane with otters murderous little animals
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#24 neil cooney

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 07:13 pm

Like anything ,they are opotunists and will go WHERE the food is .Eggs ,young rabbits and carrion are mostly overlooked by many people as being part of their diet but it is .Dry spells are hard on them that I do know when slugs and snails,worms etc are hard to find .
Imo there is a link between badgers and tb as well as deer .

I agree that there is a link between Badgers and TB in cattle but in Britain where there's a massive Badger population even if 1 % of them were carriers there'd be a big problem. But here in Ireland where the Badger is rarer IMO it's not the Badger that's at fault.

A lot of what you see and hear going on suggests there's a lot more to it and the Badger is the scapegoat. A lot of farmers agree with me.

Another thing, with modern veterinary practices moving with the 21st century how come the test a vet does on cattle is 90 years old ?????

That doesn't make sense surely.

 

As far as I know there was a project in Wicklow a couple of years ago to see was there a link between Deer and TB in cattle and the result was that there's no problem.


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#25 rob284

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 07:36 pm


Like anything ,they are opotunists and will go WHERE the food is .Eggs ,young rabbits and carrion are mostly overlooked by many people as being part of their diet but it is .Dry spells are hard on them that I do know when slugs and snails,worms etc are hard to find .
Imo there is a link between badgers and tb as well as deer .

I agree that there is a link between Badgers and TB in cattle but in Britain where there's a massive Badger population even if 1 % of them were carriers there'd be a big problem. But here in Ireland where the Badger is rarer IMO it's not the Badger that's at fault.
A lot of what you see and hear going on suggests there's a lot more to it and the Badger is the scapegoat. A lot of farmers agree with me.
Another thing, with modern veterinary practices moving with the 21st century how come the test a vet does on cattle is 90 years old ?????
That doesn't make sense surely.
 
As far as I know there was a project in Wicklow a couple of years ago to see was there a link between Deer and TB in cattle and the result was that there's no problem.
there is a massive correlation with badgers and tb in the uk, more than the media portray. If you live in the south it is hard to compare as theyre everywhere. But in the north you can compare areas of low density with badger hotspots. Where i live a badger is rare but so is tb. Move 20 mile down the road where theres a healthy population of badgers and they have regular tb issues.
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#26 foxdropper

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:29 am

Here in the South there is a distinct difference between a farm with them on and the cattle having tb versus those lucky enough not to have any and remsin tb free .
Where I walk the dogs mostly ,the vet told the farmer the deer are just as bad ,drinking from troughs ,etc . We are smack bang in the middle of the cull zone come Autumn so we shall see what difference that makes .
Farm that we rat on has an on going problem with badgers digging under the sheds which then allows access to a fox .The Polish workers found old brock curled up in the shelter pen recently with the proverbial egg on his face literally and chased him out .
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#27 3175darren

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:39 am

Here in the South there is a distinct difference between a farm with them on and the cattle having tb versus those lucky enough not to have any and remsin tb free .
Where I walk the dogs mostly ,the vet told the farmer the deer are just as bad ,drinking from troughs ,etc . We are smack bang in the middle of the cull zone come Autumn so we shall see what difference that makes .
Farm that we rat on has an on going problem with badgers digging under the sheds which then allows access to a fox .The Polish workers found old brock curled up in the shelter pen recently with the proverbial egg on his face literally and chased him out .

I have never seen as many in my life,I got into a disagreement recently with the vet, over the Alabama rot case they occurred last yr or so, he said the dog hadn't been out of the county, when i said the the sores on the dogs leg in the symptom pictures on Internet, looked the same as TB sores he went red , started saying how would they pick it up, I told him I would happily show him loads of badger latrines, the dog only has to have a sore pad,and step into one ,or even just clean itself after standing in one,he wasn't up for a protracted conversation, I would love for someone to look into the similarities, who has a bit more nouse than me, cos I am convinced, it's not Alabama rot, them Badgers have more protection, than humans,

#28 Greyman

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 03:31 pm

Like anything ,they are opotunists and will go WHERE the food is .Eggs ,young rabbits and carrion are mostly overlooked by many people as being part of their diet but it is .Dry spells are hard on them that I do know when slugs and snails,worms etc are hard to find .
Imo there is a link between badgers and tb as well as deer .

I agree that there is a link between Badgers and TB in cattle but in Britain where there's a massive Badger population even if 1 % of them were carriers there'd be a big problem. But here in Ireland where the Badger is rarer IMO it's not the Badger that's at fault.
A lot of what you see and hear going on suggests there's a lot more to it and the Badger is the scapegoat. A lot of farmers agree with me.
Another thing, with modern veterinary practices moving with the 21st century how come the test a vet does on cattle is 90 years old ?????
That doesn't make sense surely.
 
As far as I know there was a project in Wicklow a couple of years ago to see was there a link between Deer and TB in cattle and the result was that there's no problem.
deer it would appear are exempt from everything, when the whole country was locked down over foot and mouth, you couldn't even walk your dog even though humans and four toed animals can't catch It, disinfectant baths at every farm gate even fishing was stopped, yet old bambie a cloven hoofed animal perfectly capable of catching and spreading the virus was just wandering the countryside going were it liked covering several farms in a day, yet there was not a single deer killed or even tested for foot and mouth and somehow we managed to contain and eliminate the disease, most wild deer are carrying tb yet again all test prove its nothing to do with them, just more lies and cover ups from those in power that are meant to serve us

Edited by Greyman, 21 July 2017 - 03:34 pm.

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#29 foxdropper

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:16 pm

I've seen more than one badger and deer with tb .Lack lustre coat and glazed eyes ,always thin .

#30 neil cooney

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:36 am

I was stopping one morning on the farm of the man who snares for the ministry in that area and I mentioned his farm was walking with badgers and how come he hadn't culled.

He told me there was no need as his badgers were not a problem.

I also know of large herds that are never shut down but the land has plenty of badgers and I know of farmers who are regularly shut down but have no badgers near them. I remember one farmer saying to me that he reckoned a milk tanker or a vet and his vehicle and equipment would cover more farms in a day than any badger could in a night. 

I also know a vet who said he hopes that they never start to vaccinate as testing was paying for his pension.

Here in Ireland there's a lot of vets who need the badger to be the culprit or they be out of a job.

Not everyone blames the badger over here.

But like I said, there's no point in comparing the problem in both countries as they seem to be two different scenarios.






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