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jimmy8

Lead Training

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I know it's trivial to some but when your dog is on the lead and your trainig (14 week old puppy)

do you

A) let the dog walk where ever he likes as long as he isn't pulling or lagging behind

B) walk out in front as long as he isn't pulling

C, ensuring he walks behind you.

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nothing trivial about it mine is 3 years old and I still tweak his lead walking. He never pulls but I seem to have gone fussy in my old age and like him to walk exactly where i say. I wont office advice as i know bugger all :) But plenty here do

Edited by terryd

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nothing trivial about it mine is 3 years old and I still tweak his lead walking. He never pulls but I seem to have gone fussy in my old age and like him to walk exactly where i say. I wont office advice as i know bugger all :) But plenty here do

I wish you would offer advice, Terry, because I've picked up loads of tips from your posts.

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I guess it comes down to the training you choose but I'm picky too.

The pup is only 14 was and I feel I'm asking too much of her but.. Some people say don't let the dog walk in front and some say otherwise I'd be happy with by my side and alert to my movement but accomplishing it is a bit more tricky.

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You talking lurcher or gundog ?.

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I know it's trivial to some but when your dog is on the lead and your trainig (14 week old puppy)

do you

A) let the dog walk where ever he likes as long as he isn't pulling or lagging behind

B) walk out in front as long as he isn't pulling

C, ensuring he walks behind you.

 

I think that might be too early for lead training mate, how about a long line left trailing on the floor and concentrate of some kind of recall or play to keep it focused on you?

 

I keep this pup off lead mostly and just let her chase balls and get her wound up over it so she is looking at me all the time, We will not start any serious training until 6-9 months this time round we want bond and excitement, the rest of the annoying stuff we can temper later.

 

If this is a lurcher or sight hound then ignore my advice because I have zero knowledge of them, I just know the mistakes I have made on one dog and how I am working with the new one which is going well.

 

Also a young dog wont stray from you too far, if you have a long line trailing you can change direction and give the dog some encouragement and it will probably come charging back to you.

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Long line is the way to go, it's more of amanagement tool, if you see trouble ahead just grab.up the slack

A dog won't be a puller on a long line because a pulling dog needs to feel resistance to go forward then the feeling of resistance becomes what lead walking feels like

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Long line is the way to go, it's more of amanagement tool, if you see trouble ahead just grab.up the slack

A dog won't be a puller on a long line because a pulling dog needs to feel resistance to go forward then the feeling of resistance becomes what lead walking feels like

 

I've told the wife to stop taking the dog out with a lead on, she (the dog not the wife) isn't heal trained yet so it's just creating a problem, off lead she doesn't want to go far and the more fun she is having the closer she will be to heal. Not sure if that's the right way but it works for me, I reward every eye contact and anything else I want her to do with a squeaky ball or something high value, I don't give her the ball because she wants it so much, just a squeak and wave it about a bit, she gets very excited over that lol

 

P.S I have learned from the last dog not to be a boring git and make everything fun so she wants to be with me and not entertainer herself

 

P.P.S I also avoid predictable walks since the dog then knows exactly where it is going

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I walk different routes and different terrain but I don't drive so all local.

How long a line? Never used one before?

I would say I am a boring git, dog doesnt seem to give a f**k unless I'm out of sight.

does anyone pay attention to actual recommended excercise times for 4 m nth old pup, 20 minutes.

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I walk different routes and different terrain but I don't drive so all local.

How long a line? Never used one before?

I would say I am a boring git, dog doesnt seem to give a f**k unless I'm out of sight.

does anyone pay attention to actual recommended excercise times for 4 m nth old pup, 20 minutes.

 

 

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Re the exercise duration (advised 5 mins/ month) thing, i think that's to discourage people from taking a young 'busy breed' puppy out for hours to 'tire it out', rather than finding a variety of ways to stimulate and connect with it, at the cost of wearing its young joints down for the sake of a bit of peace and quiet.

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Re the exercise duration (advised 5 mins/ month) thing, i think that's to discourage people from taking a young 'busy breed' puppy out for hours to 'tire it out', rather than finding a variety of ways to stimulate and connect with it, at the cost of wearing its young joints down for the sake of a bit of peace and quiet.

 

 

I was guilty of that walked, ran my pup every night to knacker him out. Didn't do him any harm but I would been better off spending time training. I got him in the habit of going to fields every night and belting around then spent the next 3 years trying to teach him not too :laugh:

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Many small 5 minute exercises, know what you are going to be focusing on before you leave the house, recall, retrieving whistle or just bonding/play. Make it very high intensity and stop when its enjoyment levels are very very high so it is left wanting more.

 

I don't care about jumping up at this stage, I just want this pup to be so excited at our exercises it is desperate for another retrieve and then we stop and go home.

 

Edit: This what I am doing with my cocker and I would have done the same for a Lab, I don't have a clue about lurchers or any of those kind of hunting dogs.

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Re the exercise duration (advised 5 mins/ month) thing, i think that's to discourage people from taking a young 'busy breed' puppy out for hours to 'tire it out', rather than finding a variety of ways to stimulate and connect with it, at the cost of wearing its young joints down for the sake of a bit of peace and quiet.

 

 

I was guilty of that walked, ran my pup every night to knacker him out. Didn't do him any harm but I would been better off spending time training. I got him in the habit of going to fields every night and belting around then spent the next 3 years trying to teach him not too :laugh:

 

 

Same here and then I realised he was doing things for his own entertainment which wasn't associated with me. Also I overdid stuff like recall which made it boring and he would take his sweet time to pick the dummy since he probably knew we were going to do it another 20 times lol, I made it even worse by introducing the stop whistle to his retrieves way too often so he would go half way and then look back at me.

 

I made every mistake under the sun with that poor old lab :laugh:

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