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MR TEA POT

Partridge

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The tastiest game bird of them all imo.

Split two breasts , fill with two generous slices of halloumi

Wrap them both in wild boar bacon and a crack of sea salt .

And slow roast.

 

Hot or cold.

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The tastiest game bird of them all imo.

Split two breasts , fill with two generous slices of halloumi

Wrap them both in wild boar bacon and a crack of sea salt .

And slow roast.

 

Hot or cold.

Do you just have these things to hand (wild boar bacon?) Im obvs missing out on more than I'd realised, me being a non hunter and all.

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So, inspired by the Scot Rea recipe on this thread, and what I had in, I made this the other night. It was pretty good.

 

Partridge Paprikás with Papparadelle.

(Served 2 with a bit left over for my lunch)

1hr 30, minimum effort or cheffiness.

 

1 partridge

Olive oil or chicken dripping (I used a bit of both)

1/2 big onion finely sliced

4 good tomatoes cut up.

1 garlic clove chopped fine

1 large glass White wine (less than 200ml)

2 or 3 tsps ordinary (sweet) paprika

1/3 tsp smoked paprika

pinch dried thyme

Tsp tomato chutney

S+P

Big dollop soured cream. (More than half a small tub)

Paparadelle (tagliatelle / fettuccine would obvs do)

 

Heat oil/ fat in smallish saucepan, season partridge with plenty black pepper (I also used sumac, because I had some).

Brown partridge all over for about 5-10 mins. Remove to a plate.

Add onions to hot pan, and stir around til start softening and just browning. Add garlic. Add toms. Stir constantly with high heat til looks a bit slushy, smells nice and there's a bit of caramelisation on the bottom of the pan. Deglaze pan with wine, bring up to rolling boil, stirring, for a few mins.

Drop heat. Stir in paprika (both kinds), chutney and thyme.

Replace partridge in the pan, cover and simmer on low for about 1 hour, turning bird over now and then, until meat is tender.

Remove bird and allow to cool a little.

Meanwhile, pass sauce through a sieve.

Take meat off bone, (asbestos fingers) discarding skin and any stringy bits. (Happy cat and dog)

Add meat to smooth sauce.

Reheat, add salt to taste and reduce or add a drop of water as needed.... aiming for a fairly rich ragout. Carefully stir in the soured cream. (Small bowl, combine spoonful sauce and spnfl cream. Mix back into saucepan. Repeat x 2, then throw caution to the wind and just add cream and stir like crazy)

Cook the pasta (strain) and gently mix through the sauce.

Serve with a tsp of soured cream on top. (We had it with pea shoots scantily dressed in ol oil and balsamic)

Bon app.

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lucky you mate,we never seem to get partridge around here.i get offered enough pheasant to feed an army but never see partridge except some butchers shop.

 

Put a post up on pigeonwatch or other forums including this one and I bet you can get plenty, they're not worth much in feather :)

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A mate gave me 14 partridge....what way of cooking do folks do?....I've roasted with bacon on,just fancied some thing different.

The breast on their own comes out well 2 mins aside in the pan. I've come to the conclusion that cooking whole pheasant or partridge just ain't worth the effort..........but that's just me

 

 

The thighs are worth the effort. Full legs aren't worth buggering about with the tendons for what little extra meat there is but the thighs with all that corn fat are lovely and easy to eat. I've wasted hundreds but not anymore!

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