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kenny243

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somebody here told me just knit like you knit a pursenet , and just keep on going ,

that is how you make a longnet

wel i did , and it is becoming an addiction .

now just find out how to put on the salvage and the running lines , i heard you have to splice te rope .

perhaps somebody has some tips or good advice ?

 

gr

 

kenny

 

 

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Tiercel will advise you... I'm also keen to see if he has a different way of splicing the lines as the way I do mine they don't last as they should

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Tiercel will advise you... I'm also keen to see if he has a different way of splicing the lines as the way I do mine they don't last as they should

As far as splicing goes, I prefer sewing lines. They do not come apart at the most inconvenient moment and truth be told take no longer to do than a splice.

 

This one was done about 30 years ago and still going strong, more than can be said of the net that looks like Joseph's coat. .

 

2005_0206linessown0002.jpg

 

Back to the first question. Once the body of the net is finished, I am afraid there is no other way than to thread a line through one edge of the net. Once that has been done the net can then be placed on a pole to add the selvedges.

 

2010_062225ynetselvedge0016.jpg

 

You can then knit the first selvedge, to save yourself having to thread a line through the selvedge again if you have a small hole drilled in your mesh board you can add a line and thread the selvedge as you knit.

 

 

Once you have your first selvedges knitted you simply turn the net around and put the selvedges on the pole and just repeat the same process for the second selvedge.

 

2010_062225ynetselvedge0025.jpg

 

The twine I used for the selvedges on that net was purse net spun polyester, the advantages of using the thicker twine is two fold, first it helps the net to sit better on the lines. Because the net is knitted length ways and it set up when in use the same way all the knots are horizontal causing the net to want to lay out the way it was knitted, the selvedge helps negate that effect and causes the meshes to open up.

 

Although I have never had a problem with selvedges wearing, the thicker twine will all but cut any wear out that may or may not happen.

 

TC

Edited by Tiercel
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thanks tiercel , this explains alot for me !

and what about different color's for the top en bottom selvedges for night longnetting ,?

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thanks tiercel , this explains alot for me !

and what about different color's for the top en bottom selvedges for night longnetting ,?

Personal choice, some do, I have never bothered. Some say it helps tell the difference between the top and bottom line, but in practice that does not stand up to scrutiny as with a traditional set net the two lines have to be interchangeable.

 

TC

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When I made my last few nets, I followed Tiercel's advise and sewed the two end lines together. Nice and simple and strong

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My hand made nets were spliced and then I moved to spliced and stich ed with plastic thread

 

Now it's just plastic thread.

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Tiercel will advise you... I'm also keen to see if he has a different way of splicing the lines as the way I do mine they don't last as they should

As far as splicing goes, I prefer sewing lines. They do not come apart at the most inconvenient moment and truth be told take no longer to do than a splice.

 

This one was done about 30 years ago and still going strong, more than can be said of the net that looks like Joseph's coat. .

 

2005_0206linessown0002.jpg

 

Back to the first question. Once the body of the net is finished, I am afraid there is no other way than to thread a line through one edge of the net. Once that has been done the net can then be placed on a pole to add the selvedges.

 

2010_062225ynetselvedge0016.jpg

 

You can then knit the first selvedge, to save yourself having to thread a line through the selvedge again if you have a small hole drilled in your mesh board you can add a line and thread the selvedge as you knit.

 

 

Once you have your first selvedges knitted you simply turn the net around and put the selvedges on the pole and just repeat the same process for the second selvedge.

 

2010_062225ynetselvedge0025.jpg

 

The twine I used for the selvedges on that net was purse net spun polyester, the advantages of using the thicker twine is two fold, first it helps the net to sit better on the lines. Because the net is knitted length ways and it set up when in use the same way all the knots are horizontal causing the net to want to lay out the way it was knitted, the selvedge helps negate that effect and causes the meshes to open up.

 

Although I have never had a problem with selvedges wearing, the thicker twine will all but cut any wear out that may or may not happen.

 

TC

 

Also notice how Tiercel is knitting his selvage mesh, he is about 5mm off square to the board, this will allow the selvage mesh to flow off the board onto a line so your threading your net as you knit. :thumbs:

 

Les

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Tiercel will advise you... I'm also keen to see if he has a different way of splicing the lines as the way I do mine they don't last as they should

Splicing depends on the how tight your braid is. Some braided nylons are so tight its almost impossible to splice.

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