Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Free Flying Avairy Birds


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 reddog70

reddog70

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 06:29 pm

.
 

Edited by reddog70, 06 December 2016 - 07:31 pm.


#2 forest of dean redneck

forest of dean redneck

    Extreme Hunter

  • Donator
  • 10,755 posts
  • Location:not saying lol

Posted 03 October 2016 - 08:22 pm

Round here they would be food for peregrine,spar and cats
I wonder if that place was a well kept secret? As its a bird thieves dream.

#3 reddog70

reddog70

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:49 pm

.

Edited by reddog70, 06 December 2016 - 07:32 pm.


#4 stevemac

stevemac

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 666 posts

Posted 05 October 2016 - 11:34 am

It would want to be back in because it is hungry set up food and a pull string trap to catch it when it goes to eat.



#5 reddog70

reddog70

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 05 October 2016 - 06:22 pm

.

Edited by reddog70, 06 December 2016 - 07:33 pm.


#6 HedgeCrawler

HedgeCrawler

    Born Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 235 posts
  • Location:Warwickshire/oxfordshire

Posted 05 October 2016 - 07:39 pm

A friend of mine has got a pair of lovebirds that free fly in his orchard and nest in the holes in the apple trees.Both accidentally escaped and have been out for 2 years now and have done well.They've never hatched chicks as he removes the eggs before they develop but I wonder if the chicks would learn from the parents and stay around.
  • reddog70 likes this

#7 morton

morton

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,668 posts
  • Location:Keighley

Posted 08 October 2016 - 06:06 pm

The Queen had an aviary of liberty budgies,ring necks have colonised tracts of southern England.Many of the less rare Macaw species were often kept at liberty,especially Green winged as they have an habit of flying in small circles,after being educated to their surroundings.I had a flock of Rosella,s that were allowed their liberty and bred and thrived for a season,a spuggy hawk put a massive dent into that enterprise.


  • reddog70 likes this

#8 reddog70

reddog70

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 09 October 2016 - 07:12 am

.

Edited by reddog70, 06 December 2016 - 07:35 pm.


#9 morton

morton

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,668 posts
  • Location:Keighley

Posted 09 October 2016 - 05:07 pm

 

The Queen had an aviary of liberty budgies,ring necks have colonised tracts of southern England.Many of the less rare Macaw species were often kept at liberty,especially Green winged as they have an habit of flying in small circles,after being educated to their surroundings.I had a flock of Rosella,s that were allowed their liberty and bred and thrived for a season,a spuggy hawk put a massive dent into that enterprise.

nice one i like the rosellas bet it was nice  to see them out flying about..i have a small flock of avairy bred bush type budgies that were born to my avairy, might be tempted to try them in spring atb

 

All you need to do is put several wire funnels in your aviary sections,stick a branch through initially for the birds to find their way back.Its best to do it when the birds are breeding as it encourages them to return to their partners and nestbox.The Rosella,s were often a bright flash of red flitting through the trees in unison,11 of them at one stage,sadly the hawk flew faster and hungrier.


  • reddog70 likes this

#10 reddog70

reddog70

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 09 October 2016 - 07:38 pm

.

Edited by reddog70, 06 December 2016 - 07:36 pm.


#11 morton

morton

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,668 posts
  • Location:Keighley

Posted 09 October 2016 - 08:26 pm

 

 

 

The Queen had an aviary of liberty budgies,ring necks have colonised tracts of southern England.Many of the less rare Macaw species were often kept at liberty,especially Green winged as they have an habit of flying in small circles,after being educated to their surroundings.I had a flock of Rosella,s that were allowed their liberty and bred and thrived for a season,a spuggy hawk put a massive dent into that enterprise.

nice one i like the rosellas bet it was nice  to see them out flying about..i have a small flock of avairy bred bush type budgies that were born to my avairy, might be tempted to try them in spring atb

 

All you need to do is put several wire funnels in your aviary sections,stick a branch through initially for the birds to find their way back.Its best to do it when the birds are breeding as it encourages them to return to their partners and nestbox.The Rosella,s were often a bright flash of red flitting through the trees in unison,11 of them at one stage,sadly the hawk flew faster and hungrier.

 

cheers you have convinced me to go ahead with it :D and will be  looking forward to the spring now ..i have always had some of  their feeding vessels the same as you can buy for feeding wild birds, hoping that if i did get any ascapees, they might recognize the feeders and stand a better chance in the wild ...thanks very much for the info :good:

 

Expect a few losses,at least 25% in the initial stage,dependant on the fecking hawk factor,nothing a pole trap will account for :angel: .Any young liberty bred birds often take the equation down to more acceptable levels with each generation.


  • reddog70 likes this

#12 stevemac

stevemac

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 666 posts

Posted 10 October 2016 - 10:34 am

Any bird escapes the aviary here gets smashed by the myriad of birds of prey, from butcher birds to hawks.



#13 morton

morton

    Extreme Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,668 posts
  • Location:Keighley

Posted 16 October 2016 - 07:58 pm

Any bird escapes the aviary here gets smashed by the myriad of birds of prey, from butcher birds to hawks.

How do the native bird species survive such onslaught.



#14 stevemac

stevemac

    Mega Hunter

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 666 posts

Posted 19 October 2016 - 10:31 am

small birds stick to the under story and thick cover. only darting out for short periods. parrots tend to stick to large flocks . and it is amazing how the bright colours camouflage in the gum trees. Australia is also a very big place and birds and Cockatiels and budgerigars  do not live east of the ranges though they have there own predators. small finches  and wrens. get smashed by any of there preditors that can get in where they live but most are to big. the lorikeets   are a bit bigger but they cop it from the hawks.


Edited by stevemac, 19 October 2016 - 10:46 am.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users