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Welder Electrics


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#1 walshie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:43 pm

I've finally got myself a decent little inverter welder. It runs on 13a ok, but I don't really "get" electrics.

 

I have a massive armoured power cable running to the garage which ends in a fuse board. From this there is 16a cable running to a cooker socket.

 

I use the 13a plug-in part of this socket, so I assume even though 16a is running to it, it's only 13a and apparently that's a bit marginal at the higher amps on the welder (160a).

 

Is this socket only 13a because it only takes a 13a plug?

 

As there is obviously no cooker in the garage (shame), would it make sense to run a 16a cable from the cooker socket and end it with a 16a socket like you get on caravans, and put the matching plug on the welder?

 

Or is there an easier solution?  :hmm:

 

And no, it's not a townie question as townies have welders too.  :laugh:



#2 smithie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:48 pm

I don't know fook all about electric. I would Just plug it in and use it.

If the fuse keeps popping stop using it.

What's the worst thing that can happen :)
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#3 walshie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:52 pm

I don't know fook all about electric. I would Just plug it in and use it.

If the fuse keeps popping stop using it.

What's the worst thing that can happen :)

 

Apart from a fire or an explosion you mean? 

 

It hasn't popped anything yet, but I've only been up to 120a. 

 

I just thought I should or could make use of a 16a supply as there's one there.



#4 JDHUNTING

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 05:11 pm

As said just crank it up and see if it trips, if so remove breaker and replace it with a nail
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#5 smithie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 05:15 pm

You don't have to use all the power it can supply. For example some things have a 3a fuse on but plug in to a socket that had a 13a plug on before

If the welder is ment to take 13a then don't swap the end and give it 16a as it will die without the 13a fuse to save it..
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#6 smithie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 05:28 pm

Walshie try to remember not to use water on electrical fires

Just in case lol

#7 Rabid

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 07:46 pm

I have a 200amp inverter and that runs all day everyday on a 13amp plug and has don't for probably 7 or 8 years
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#8 walshie

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 07:54 pm

I have a 200amp inverter and that runs all day everyday on a 13amp plug and has don't for probably 7 or 8 years

 

That's sorted it then. Cheers. 



#9 rick12345

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 05:50 pm

The transformer in the inverter will do the hard work whilst only requiring a 13a a/c supply. As long as the circuit breaker, coming from the main fuse board in the house, and the one in the garage board is rated at over 13a.
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#10 andysparks

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 07:59 pm

What size is the breaker/ fuse supplying the cooking socket (Normally they are fed at around 40 amp)? If it is a 16amp just remove the cooker socket and put a 16 amp socket on the end of the cable instead and the corresponding plug on the welder ( the caravan type you mentioned). What size supply does the welder actually need, it should say in the manual. Ps I'm a sparky by trade
ATB Andy

#11 walshie

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 08:08 pm

What size is the breaker/ fuse supplying the cooking socket (Normally they are fed at around 40 amp)? If it is a 16amp just remove the cooker socket and put a 16 amp socket on the end of the cable instead and the corresponding plug on the welder ( the caravan type you mentioned). What size supply does the welder actually need, it should say in the manual. Ps I'm a sparky by trade
ATB Andy

 

I'll check what size the breaker supplying it once I've traced it back and work out which one it is. The welder is American, so the instructions assume I am too.  :laugh:  It just says 1ph 230v. 

 

Most other inverters say 160 amp requires a 16a supply, so I guess that's the same.



#12 andysparks

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 08:17 pm

Inverter welders are funny old things and the supply varies between manufactuers but like you say 16A is the norm. It will be easier once you know the size of the breaker feeding the cooker socket as if it's bigger than 16amp, you don't really want to be putting a 16 amp socket on the end as you will be over rating it and have the potential for electrical fire/ damage (if the welder developed a fault.)
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#13 ryaldinhio

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Posted 24 September 2016 - 05:07 am

Walshie, there is no such thing as a 16A cable fella!

The fuse protects the cable that follows it. So the breaker in your DB should be suitably rated to protect the cable that comes out of that and into you 'cooker outlet'.

If the welder comes with a standard 3 pin socket on rated at 13A, i.e. with a 13A fuse in it, DO NOT replace this with anything rated higher as this 13A fuse is to protect the flex from the plug to the bit of kit.

If however this is second hand and this plug has been fitted by someone for ease of use then you need to refer to manufacturers info for max load of the bit of kit.




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