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william152016

Compound Bow Maintenance

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To keep your compound bow as good as new you will need to look after it, although as a mechanical device it will be prone to wear and tear like anything else. There are however some simple maintenance checks you can do to keep it in top notch.

Check the strings and cables

You will need to apply a light coating of bow string wax every fortnight at least to keep them performing at their best and protect them from damage. When considering which wax to buy it is worth paying extra for a high quality brand rather than cheap alternatives as it will pay for itself in the long run and you will usually get more from the strings and cables this way.
They will most likely need replacing every year or 2 years, but be sure to check them regularly for signs of wear and tear or weaknesses. As soon as you notice this, it is time to get them replaced. This requires a special bow press and you will need to take it to a professional to do this.

Eccentric Lubrication

The axles will need to have some special lubricant applied every 1000-2000 shots. The lubricant should be Teflon or silicon based if possible or quality grease. Lubricating oils like WD-40 will harm the bow so keep away from them - they can also collect dust and dirt which will reduce the performance.

Centershot calibration

The centreshot calibration is the fine tuning of the shot upon the power path of the string, and will keep your bow accurate. This is quite easy to align and all you need to do is move the arrow rest either to the left or the right depending on where it sits at the moment. A release shooter should line up the shot with the power path of the string. Finger shooters though will need to place their shot so the tip is a slightly outside the string's power path.

These maintenance tips will keep your bow shooting as good as it did when you first got it. If in doubt you can always take it to a professional to do this for you, but try and learn yourself as it only takes a few minutes to do every now and again.

 

Thanks for reading !

--------------------------

William S. Guerrera

Website: http://hunthacks.com/

 

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Nice one ;) thanks for posting I'm sure that will be some useful information for some people! I've never thought of it before but you would think there would be an archery section on here? But as its illegal to hunt any animal with a bow in uk there maybe isn't much of a following? I'm sure there is a lot of target archers around tho!

 

Atb ant

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My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

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To keep your compound bow as good as new you will need to look after it, although as a mechanical device it will be prone to wear and tear like anything else. There are however some simple maintenance checks you can do to keep it in top notch.

Check the martin cusotom bowstring and cable

You will need to apply a light coating of bow string wax every fortnight at least to keep them performing at their best and protect them from damage. When considering which wax to buy it is worth paying extra for a high quality brand rather than cheap alternatives as it will pay for itself in the long run and you will usually get more from the strings and cables this way.

They will most likely need replacing every year or 2 years, but be sure to check them regularly for signs of wear and tear or weaknesses. As soon as you notice this, it is time to get them replaced. This requires a special bow press and you will need to take it to a professional to do this.

Eccentric Lubrication

The axles will need to have some special lubricant applied every 1000-2000 shots. The lubricant should be Teflon or silicon based if possible or quality grease. Lubricating oils like WD-40 will harm the bow so keep away from them - they can also collect dust and dirt which will reduce the performance.

Centershot calibration

The centreshot calibration is the fine tuning of the shot upon the power path of the string, and will keep your bow accurate. This is quite easy to align and all you need to do is move the arrow rest either to the left or the right depending on where it sits at the moment. A release shooter should line up the shot with the power path of the string. Finger shooters though will need to place their shot so the tip is a slightly outside the string's power path.

These maintenance tips will keep your bow shooting as good as it did when you first got it. If in doubt you can always take it to a professional to do this for you, but try and learn yourself as it only takes a few minutes to do every now and again.

 

Thanks for reading !

--------------------------

William S. Guerrera

Website: http://hunthacks.com/

 

 

Very good post. I unfirtunately agree with buffalo griff.. my bow has been hanging for some time :( This is good motivation to go fix her up though! Thanks for posting.

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My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?

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My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?

 

Nothing fancy- an old Barnett Safari.

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My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?

Nothing fancy- an old Barnett Safari.
Man I lusted after one of those as a kid as we were going through our home made bow and arrow stage! :laugh:

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My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?

Nothing fancy- an old Barnett Safari.
Man I lusted after one of those as a kid as we were going through our home made bow and arrow stage! :laugh:

 

Me too! But only got this one in later life.

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I remember when John Rambo himself popularised the compound,i think

 

 

 

My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?

Nothing fancy- an old Barnett Safari.
Man I lusted after one of those as a kid as we were going through our home made bow and arrow stage! :laugh:
1985 when old john J Rambo had his Hoyt in rambo 2,i always wanted those explosive areow tips.
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I remember when John Rambo himself popularised the compound,i think

 

 

 

My compound bow has been hanging in the shed with a broken string for years, that might inspire me to give it a bit of tlc and get it back in action. Thanks Griff. :thumbs:

What make is it gruff?
Nothing fancy- an old Barnett Safari.
Man I lusted after one of those as a kid as we were going through our home made bow and arrow stage! :laugh:
1985 when old john J Rambo had his Hoyt in rambo 2,i always wanted those explosive areow tips.

 

Yes many a happy hour was spent trying to replicate the exploding arrows.............. :whistling:

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I bought a bear attack compound bow brand new about 4 years ago, I have used it twice! What maintenance should I do to it (if any) if it is just stored and not used? One day I will get round to selling it.

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