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craggers

Greyhound Foxes Help Needed

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There is a tradition amongst the old hunters of these fells that here was formerly a race of great grey foxes even larger than those we style the greyhound fox in these days. Mr. Mayson tells me his father was in at the death of what he regarded as the last of these giants. It was killed at Bowder Stone in Borrowdale and weighed 29lbs. They are said to have been able to easily outpace the hounds of those days, and that the only way of having a successful hunt was to have a couple of dogs on each top or likely place, and when one of these great fellows got on the move they slipped them at view when their chance came, and so raced down with fresh hounds, even then seldom having any success.

 

 

John Crozier of Riddings, Master of Hounds, by Albert Nicholson 1906

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Not doing too well in our search for the "Greyhound" lads / lassies, got 8 samples but need more, we increased the cut off date to 1935 after some new research.

 

so help us out.................. there is bugger all on tv, so have 30 mins in the loft or shed. you never know what you might find. pre 1935 , history if poss and need 6 - 8 hairs

 

thanks

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Hello mate i was watching one in the field at the back of my house a few weeks ago and this was the longest legged of i had seen i thought at first it was a rough lurcher, it was very slim it was shot on an estate just up the road and the lad who shot , told me it was a very athletic fox the best he had ever seen

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thanks for that,greyhound's are extinct but I bet the genes are not,this report is probably a greyhound

 

FIGHT ON A NARROW LEDGE

Followers of the Blencathra certainly have not before this winter beheld such a peculiar or stirring sight as was vouchsafed them on Saturday when a fox found in Yew Crag, in the Naddle Valley, declined to leave his fastness in the mountain side and climbed to a small ledge below an overhang of rock in the crag face. Hounds themselves, were unable to shift him and the fox paid little heed to the clamour they mad around him. A terrier, however, got so near that he was obliged to abandon his position, and he crept this time to a ledge where he appeared to be even safer than before.

What followed amazed onlookers long accustomed to extraordinary happenings in the fells. The terrier climbed almost after the manner of a cragsman to the bink, and there ensued two minutes desperate fighting on the narrow ledge the snarling fox crouching at bay while the terrier tried to reach past the lightning like strokes of flashing fangs for its own jaw hold. The fox hugged the wall of rock; the terrier was on the verge of a precipice. Even so the terrier was punishing severely the creature of the wild. The fox suddenly leapt out of the crag. The terrier followed, but lost its foothold and fell 30 or 40 feet on to the screes. Fortunately, the snow covering saved this gamest of tykes from severe injuries and she is now little the worse for her experience. Hounds viewing the fox away broke into a wild melody that made the valley ring, and continued to pitch their voices at the top of their gamut while they ran him to a notorious bield known as Birk Tree Borran. In the depths of this earth he offered a stout resistance to the terriers. Two he mauled so severely that follower were glad to withdraw them, and it was left to a tyke more famous for its valour than it’s discretion to account for a fighting fox of the true hill breed.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 26th January 1927

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Greyhound Fox DNA Project....... just been to Warwick Uni, we have received 27 samples................... sadly most are unusable but two (one from 1880 and the other 1906) are interesting but require much more work. The reason the samples are unusable is to do with the extraction of the DNA.
it is not too late to join the project....................... if you have a mask or brush pre 1935 with a provenance and are willing to donate 6 - 8 hairs please contact me at cumbrian-lad@hotmail.co.uk

 

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Is it any fox shot pre 1935 or just ones that match the greyhound fox description? I have an old mask and brush (will check dates) but it's just a big dog fox that my great uncle shot near clitheroe I think?

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Air gun ant, Craggers means foxes caught on the fells by hounds, pre '35. There well may be dated masks of shot ones on the walls of some hostelry, but ideally, farmers and hunters of the fell packs would rather have a mask from a fox caught by hounds adorning their homes and yes, relating to the greyhound type

Edited by cragman

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Craggers is having trouble logging in so he sent this to me to put up for him.

"Recently I put out an appeal for taxidermy specimens of "foxes which may be of the now extinct "Greyhound" species. I am happy to say we have found a complete fox, authenticated by Peel himself! We are hoping to take hairs for DNA testing this week.

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All very romantic but 20 quid says a fox is a fox after alls said and done .They vary in size ,length and height wherever you go mate so dont be too disappointed that you are chasing the proverbial .Just an observation based on 35 years of hunting ,shooting up and down the country .

Maybe spend your time on human migration ,and how to stop it .

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Foxdropper I'm honored that a man of such experience finds time to comment

 

On my posting thank you

Edited by craggers

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All very romantic but 20 quid says a fox is a fox after alls said and done .They vary in size ,length and height wherever you go mate so dont be too disappointed that you are chasing the proverbial .Just an observation based on 35 years of hunting ,shooting up and down the country .

Maybe spend your time on human migration ,and how to stop it

Edited by craggers

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