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mark williams

Best Zero Range For Both .177 And .22

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Hi james

 

Sorry to hear about your condition. Yes, I think there is an easy way to calculate a number that you can use. On average, there are 2.5ft to a single step and there are 3ft to a yard. Would you say your average step is say, half this due to your limp? If so, simply double the number of steps you need to make the same yards outlined above. Make sense? So, your step, in your case could be 1.25ft.

 

So, based on the numbers above, the standard units say, its 25 steps to mark out 20yds. For you, if your steps were half that of the standard units, then its 50 steps for 20yds. Does this sound reasonable, or are your steps, smaller / larger than half the standard units (i.e., one third or two thirds the average)? I can calculate more exactly if you would like.

 

I cant help with the walking in circles!!!!! :thumbs::laugh:

 

I can, leave the drinking beer until after you have been shooting!

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Its a great topic, but I find that practice, practice and more practice are important. You need to reactively shoot. Its great to shoot pellet on pellet at targets at known ranges. Great for target shooters but in the field, especially in woodland where its more difficult to judge distance , the whole thing becomes so much more complicated. You have to make adjustments for the elements, elevation, and other factors.

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Its a great topic, but I find that practice, practice and more practice are important. You need to reactively shoot. Its great to shoot pellet on pellet at targets at known ranges. Great for target shooters but in the field, especially in woodland where its more difficult to judge distance , the whole thing becomes so much more complicated. You have to make adjustments for the elements, elevation, and other factors.

A range finder is a great help Kenyon imo

 

atb

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Best to learn it as part of fieldcraft....its not that hard.

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For me. Shooting with a sub-12 ft/lb spring rifle. Scope on 6-8 magnification and parallax correctly set for zero range distance:

 

.177

40 metres for .177 is the optimum = Enables some serious long range shots and require a little hold under for closer ranges and holdover for very close range targets.

 

.22

25 to 30 metres optimum for .22. = Takes good account of looped trajectory and makes most long range shots a matter of holdover.

 

.22 FAC HW80.

30 metres optimum. The trajectory is very flat due to very high velocity of the pellet, so only a little holdover is needed for targets at greater distances and pretty well dead-on at closer ranges.

 

Just my methods of zero by calibre and power output. But it's what I understand from my rifles trajectory maps.

 

25 metres is good for woodland shooting and means you aim pretty much dead on for squirrels and pigeons in trees as well as on the ground.

 

Good fieldcraft and an ability to accurately estimate range distance and where your shot is going to rise and fall over that distance, is an essential skill to advantage all preferred zeroing ranges.

 

I never use a rangefinder or lazers and never have. Learn to estimate distances through your reticle and you won't have to faff about carrying kit and making extra movements that give you away.

 

Besides, rabbits are bloody inconsiderate little sods that seldom pop up at just the range you want them to!

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I use chairgun myself

There are a lot of factors to account for your optimum zero

Scope hight for example and sightbase

That is centre of scope to Muzzle

However sightbase doesn't seem to have too much of an impact

My Bobcat has the scope 2.63 inches above breech centre and 17 inches from the muzzle

I have selected a 0.5 inch killzone as I feel the size of our target, ie the brain of a creature classed as pest, is not well represented with a 1 inch zone

That would be one big pigeon, rat or rabbit :laugh:

 

With this setup I'm in the kill zone from 20 to 37 yards which lends itself nicely to dispatching that critter without too much holdover

The further your target just aim a slight titch higher

post-76949-0-66947900-1423906871_thumb.png

Edited by Big Uli
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In thick woodland even rangefinders are decieved, with low overhanging branches and leaves, even in winter and a slight breeze. Best to take a few test shots at their range on a tree or similar before you gp for the kill shot.

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As i hide shoot a lot i find a range finder a very useful tool.I range the sitty tree once only and i know exactly my distance.

Many a time when walking my GSP gun dog i take my range finder only and guess an objects distance then laze it. This practice has made me very good at predicting ranges, when walking with my rifle only.

As Kenyon says,- a few test shots before settling down to wait, ensures your zero is correct and i must agree with Simon that you are losing your shot time and making movements with a rangefinder, ranging first before taking the shot.

 

atb

Edited by mark williams
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For me. Shooting with a sub-12 ft/lb spring rifle. Scope on 6-8 magnification and parallax correctly set for zero range distance:

 

.177

40 metres for .177 is the optimum = Enables some serious long range shots and require a little hold under for closer ranges and holdover for very close range targets.

 

.22

25 to 30 metres optimum for .22. = Takes good account of looped trajectory and makes most long range shots a matter of holdover.

 

.22 FAC HW80.

30 metres optimum. The trajectory is very flat due to very high velocity of the pellet, so only a little holdover is needed for targets at greater distances and pretty well dead-on at closer ranges.

 

Just my methods of zero by calibre and power output. But it's what I understand from my rifles trajectory maps.

 

25 metres is good for woodland shooting and means you aim pretty much dead on for squirrels and pigeons in trees as well as on the ground.

 

Good fieldcraft and an ability to accurately estimate range distance and where your shot is going to rise and fall over that distance, is an essential skill to advantage all preferred zeroing ranges.

 

I never use a rangefinder or lazers and never have. Learn to estimate distances through your reticle and you won't have to faff about carrying kit and making extra movements that give you away.

 

Besides, rabbits are bloody inconsiderate little sods that seldom pop up at just the range you want them to!

very well said :thumbs:

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Besides, rabbits are bloody inconsiderate little sods that seldom pop up at just the range you want them to! Bunny Tickler... thats hit the nail on the head!! :victory: Thats got to be the quote of a lifetime.... soooo true!! :clapper:

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